Deuteronomy 25:4
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain.

New Living Translation
"You must not muzzle an ox to keep it from eating as it treads out the grain.

English Standard Version
“You shall not muzzle an ox when it is treading out the grain.

New American Standard Bible
"You shall not muzzle the ox while he is threshing.

King James Bible
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Do not muzzle an ox while it treads out grain."

International Standard Version
"Don't muzzle an ox while it is threshing grain."

NET Bible
You must not muzzle your ox when it is treading grain.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Never muzzle an ox when it's threshing grain.

Jubilee Bible 2000
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treads out the grain.

King James 2000 Bible
You shall not muzzle the ox when it treads out the grain.

American King James Version
You shall not muzzle the ox when he treads out the corn.

American Standard Version
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the grain .

Douay-Rheims Bible
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that treadeth out thy corn on the floor.

Darby Bible Translation
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out [the corn].

English Revised Version
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn.

Webster's Bible Translation
Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn.

World English Bible
You shall not muzzle the ox when he treads out [the grain].

Young's Literal Translation
'Thou dost not muzzle an ox in its threshing.
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

25:4 This is a charge to husbandmen. It teaches us to make much of the animals that serve us. But we must learn, not only to be just, but kind to all who are employed for the good of our better part, our souls, 1Co 9:9.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 4. - The leaving the ox unmuzzled when treading out the corn was in order that the animal might be free to eat of the grains which its labor severed from the husks. This prohibition, therefore, was dictated by a regard to the rights and claims of animals employed in labor; but there is involved in it the general principle that all labor is to be duly requited, and hence it seems to have passed into a proverb, and was applied to men as well as the lower animals (cf. 1 Corinthians 9:9; 1 Timothy 5:18). The use of oxen to tread out the corn and the rule of leaving the animals so employed unmuzzled still prevail among the Arabs and other Eastern peoples (Robinson, 'Bib. Res.,' 2:206, 207; 3:6; Kitto, 'Bib. Cycl.,' 1:86).

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Thou shall not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn. As oxen are used in ploughing, so likewise in treading or beating out the corn; of the manner of which; see Gill on 1 Corinthians 9:9; now while it was thus employed, it might not be restrained by any means from eating the corn as it had an opportunity, either by a muzzle put over its mouth, or other ways. The Gentiles had several ways of restraining their cattle from eating, while they thus made use of them, to which this law is opposed. Maimonides (f) has collected several or them together, as prohibited by it; as putting a thorn into its mouth, causing a lion to lie down by it, or causing its calf to lie down without, or spreading a skin on the top of the corn, that so it may not eat. Aelianus (g) relates a very particular way of hindering oxen from eating at such times, used some countries, which was this; that oxen might not eat of the ears of corn, in a floor where they were trod out, they used to besmear their nostrils with cows' dung, which was so disagreeable to the creature, that it would not taste anything though pressed with famine. This law is not to be limited to the ox only, or to this peculiar work assigned it; but, as Jarchi says, respects any sort of cattle, and whatsoever work that has food in it, none of them being to be restrained from eating while at work: and this law was not made for the creatures only, but for men also; and especially for the sake of ministers of the word; who for their strength, labour, and industry, are compared to oxen, and ought to be comfortably supported and maintained on account of their work; for the illustration and confirmation of which this passage is twice produced; see Gill on 1 Corinthians 9:9; See Gill on 1 Corinthians 9:10; See Gill on 1 Timothy 5:17; See Gill on 1 Timothy 5:18.

(f) Hilchot Shecirut, c. 13. sect. 2, 3.((g) Hist. Animal. l. 4. c. 25.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

4. Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn—In Judea, as in modern Syria and Egypt, the larger grains were beaten out by the feet of oxen, which, yoked together, day after day trod round the wide open spaces which form the threshing-floors. The animals were allowed freely to pick up a mouthful, when they chose to do so: a wise as well as humane regulation, introduced by the law of Moses (compare 1Co 9:9; 1Ti 5:17, 18).

Deuteronomy 25:4 Additional Commentaries
Context
Laws of Fairness
3"He may beat him forty times but no more, so that he does not beat him with many more stripes than these and your brother is not degraded in your eyes. 4"You shall not muzzle the ox while he is threshing.
Cross References
1 Corinthians 9:9
For it is written in the Law of Moses: "Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain." Is it about oxen that God is concerned?

1 Timothy 5:18
For Scripture says, "Do not muzzle an ox while it is treading out the grain," and "The worker deserves his wages."

Proverbs 12:10
The righteous care for the needs of their animals, but the kindest acts of the wicked are cruel.
Treasury of Scripture

You shall not muzzle the ox when he treads out the corn.

shalt not In Judea, as well as in Egypt, Greece, and Italy, they made use of beeves to tread out the corn; and the same mode of threshing still obtains in Arabia, Barbary, and other eastern countries, to the present day. The sheaves lie open and expanded on the threshing floors, and the cattle continually move round them, and thus tread out the grain. The natives of Aleppo still religiously observe the ancient humane practice, inculcated by this law, of permitting the oxen to remain unmuzzled when treading out the corn.

muzzle

Proverbs 12:10 A righteous man regards the life of his beast: but the tender mercies …

1 Corinthians 9:9,10 For it is written in the law of Moses, You shall not muzzle the mouth …

1 Timothy 5:17,18 Let the elders that rule well be counted worthy of double honor, …

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