1 Chronicles 1:1
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

New Living Translation
The descendants of Adam were Seth, Enosh,

English Standard Version
Adam, Seth, Enosh;

New American Standard Bible
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

King James Bible
Adam, Sheth, Enosh,

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

International Standard Version
Adam fathered Seth, who fathered Enosh,

NET Bible
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

Jubilee Bible 2000
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

King James 2000 Bible
Adam, Sheth, Enosh,

American King James Version
Adam, Sheth, Enosh,

American Standard Version
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

Douay-Rheims Bible
Adam, Seth, Enos,

Darby Bible Translation
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

English Revised Version
Adam, Seth, Enosh;

Webster's Bible Translation
Adam, Sheth, Enosh,

World English Bible
Adam, Seth, Enosh,

Young's Literal Translation
Adam, Sheth, Enosh,
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

1:1-27 This chapter, and many that follow, repeat the genealogies, or lists of fathers and children in the Bible history, and put them together, with many added. When compared with other places, there are some differences found; yet we must not therefore stumble at the word, but bless God that the things necessary to salvation are plain enough. The original of the Jewish nation is here traced from the first man that God created, and is thereby distinguished from the obscure, fabulous, and absurd origins assigned to other nations. But the nations now are all so mingled with one another, that no one nation, nor the greatest part of any, is descended entirely from any of one nation, nor the greatest part of any, is descended entirely from any of these fountains. Only this we are sure of, that God has created of one blood all nations of men; they are all descended from one Adam, one Noah. Have we not all one father? Has not one God created us? Mal 2:10.

Pulpit Commentary

Verses 1-4. - A. LIST OF GENERATIONS FROM ADAM TO NOAH. These verses contain a line of genealogical descents, ten in number, from Adam to Noah, adding mention of the three sons of the latter. The stride from Adam to Seth, and the genealogy's entire obliviousness of Cain and Abel, are full of suggestion. All of these thirteen names in the Hebrew and in the Septuagint Version, though not those in the Authorized Version, are facsimiles of those which occur in Genesis 5. They are not accompanied, however, here, as they are there, by any chronological attempt. Probably the main reason of this is that any references of the kind were quite beside the objects which the compiler of this work had in view. It is, however, possible that other reasons for this chronological silence may have existed. The uncertainities attaching to the chronology found in Genesis, as regards this table, may have been suspected or evident - uncertainties which afterwards proclaim themselves so loudly in the differences observable between the Hebrew, Samaritan, and Septuagint versions. Thus the Hebrew text exhibits the total aggregate of years from Adam to the birth of Noah, as amounting to one thousand and fifty-six; the Samaritan version to seven hundred and seven only; and the Septuagint to as many as sixteen hundred and sixty-two; nevertheless, all three agree in adding five hundred years onward to the birth of Shem, and another hundred years to the coming of the Flood. It must be remarked of this first genealogical table, whether occurring here or in Genesis, that, notwithstanding its finished appearance, notwithstanding the impression it undoubtedly first makes on the reader, that it purports to give all the intervening generations from the first to Shem, it may not be so; nor be intended to convey that impression. It is held by some that names are omitted, and with them of course the years which belonged to them. There can be no doubt that this theory would go far to remove several great difficulties, and that some analogies might be invoked in support of it, from the important genealogies of the New Testament. The altogether abrupt opening of this book - a succession of proper names without any verb or predication - cannot be considered as even partially compensated by the first sentence of ch. 9, "So all Israel were reckoned by genealogies; and behold, they are written in the book of the kings of Israel and Judah." This verse applies directly to the genealogies of Israel and the tribes, beginning ch. 2:1, while under any circumstances, we must look on the first portion of this book as a series of tables, here and there slightly annotated, and suddenly suspended before the eyes.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

Adam, Seth,.... These first four verses exactly agree with the account of the antediluvian patriarchs in Genesis 5:1, the first letter in Adam is larger than usual, as a memorial, as Buxtorf (m) observes, of the first and only man, from whence mankind had their beginning, and whose history the author had undertaken to write.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

THE FIRST BOOK OF THE CHRONICLES. Commentary by Robert Jamieson

CHAPTER 1

1Ch 1:1-23. Adam's Line to Noah.

1. Adam, &c.—"Begat" must be understood. Only that one member of the family is mentioned, who came in the direct order of succession.

1 Chronicles 1:1 Additional Commentaries
2 Kings 25:30
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