2 Kings 14:10
You have indeed smitten Edom, and your heart has lifted you up: glory of this, and tarry at home: for why should you meddle to your hurt, that you should fall, even you, and Judah with you?
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(10) Thou hast indeed smitteni.e., thou hast thoroughly worsted; gained a brilliant victory over Edom. (The “indeed” qualifies “smitten.”)

Hath lifted.—Rather, lifteth.

Glory of this, and tarry at home.—Literally, be honoured, and abide in thine own house, i.e., be content with the glory thou hast achieved. Rest on thy laurels, and do not risk them by further enterprises which may not turn out so favourably. So the Vulg. Thenius explains: “Show thy might at home,” referring to the LXX. (Comp. 2Samuel 6:20).

For why shouldest thou meddle to thine hurt?—Rather, and why shouldst thou challenge or provoke (literally, attack, Deuteronomy 2:5) disaster?

2 Kings 14:10. Thou hast indeed smitten Edom — A weak, unarmed, undisciplined body of men; and therefore thou thinkest thou canst carry all before thee, and subdue the regular forces of Israel with as much ease. Thy heart hath lifted thee up — Here lies the root of all sin; it is in the heart; thence it proceeds, and that must bear the blame. It is not providence, the event, the occasion, whatever it is, that makes men proud, or secure, or discontented, or the like; but it is their own heart that doth it. Thou art proud of the blow thou hast given to Edom, as if that had made thee formidable to all mankind. Glory of this, and tarry at home — Content thyself with that glory and success, and let not thy ambition betray thee to thy ruin. For why shouldest thou meddle to thy hurt? — As fools often do. Many would have wealth and honour enough, if they did but know when they have enough. That thou shouldest fall, and Judah with thee — He warns him of the consequence; that it would be fatal, not to himself only, but to his kingdom, which he ought to protect.14:8-14 For some time after the division of the kingdoms, Judah suffered much from the enmity of Israel. After Asa's time, it suffered more by the friendship of Israel, and by the alliance made with them. Now we meet with hostility between them again. How may a humble man smile to hear two proud and scornful men set their wits on work, to vilify and undervalue one another! Unholy success excites pride; pride excites contentions. The effects of pride in others, are insufferable to those who are proud themselves. These are the sources of trouble and sin in private life; but when they arise between princes, they become the misery of their whole kingdoms. Jehoash shows Amaziah the folly of his challenge; Thine heart has lifted thee up. The root of all sin is in the heart, thence it flows. It is not Providence, the event, the occasion, whatever it is, that makes men proud, secure, discontented, or the like, but their own hearts do it.Glory of this ... - literally, "Be honored;" i. e. "Enjoy thy honor ... be content with it." "Why wilt thou meddle with misfortune?" 9. Jehoash the king of Israel sent to Amaziah—People in the East very often express their sentiments in a parabolic form, especially when they intend to convey unwelcome truths or a contemptuous sneer. This was the design of the admonitory fable related by Joash in his reply. The thistle, a low shrub, might be chosen to represent Amaziah, a petty prince; the cedar, the powerful sovereign of Israel, and the wild beast that trampled down the thistle the overwhelming army with which Israel could desolate Judah. But, perhaps, without making so minute an application, the parable may be explained generally, as describing in a striking manner the effects of pride and ambition, towering far beyond their natural sphere, and sure to fall with a sudden and ruinous crash. The moral of the fable is contained in 2Ki 14:10. Glory of this; content thyself with that glory and success, and let not thine ambition betray thee to ruin. Thou hast indeed smitten Edom, and thine heart hath lifted thee up,.... Swelled him with pride and vanity on account of the victory he had obtained over the Edomites; which pride was at the bottom of his message to him, and that goes before a fall: Proverbs 16:18.

glory of this, and tarry at home; be content with the glory of it, and boast of it at home, but do not swagger abroad, and insult thy neighbours:

for why shouldest thou meddle to thy hurt, that thou shouldest fall, even thou, and Judah with thee? suggesting to him, that he had better be quiet, since it would be to the harm, if not the ruin, of him and his kingdom.

Thou hast indeed smitten Edom, and thine heart hath lifted thee up: {f} glory of this, and tarry at home: for why shouldest thou meddle to thy hurt, that thou shouldest fall, even thou, and Judah with thee?

(f) Brag of the victory, so that you stay at home and do not provoke me.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
10. and thine heart hath lifted thee up] The more usual expression is that ‘the heart is lifted up’. Cf. Deuteronomy 8:14; Deuteronomy 17:20; 2 Chronicles 26:16; Ezekiel 28:2. But when the heart is lifted up, the whole spirit of the man soars toward lofty aims.

glory of this] R.V. glory thereof. i.e. Of the Edomite conquest.

tarry [R.V. abide] at home] The change is to harmonize with the rendering in 2 Chronicles.

why shouldest thou meddle to thy hurt] The ‘meddling’ implied by the verb is generally the meddling of contention. Cf. Deuteronomy 2:9 where the A.V. has ‘contend not with them’, and in verses 5 and 19 of the same chapter, where the same word occurs, the R.V. has adopted ‘contend’ instead of ‘meddle’. The order is there given in respect of those nations whom the Israelites are charged to let alone. Hence in this verse R.V. has on the margin ‘provoke not calamity’. Calamity is thus viewed as an enemy, with whom Amaziah was unwisely venturing to go to war.Verse 10. - Thou hast indeed smitten Edom (see ver. 7, and the comment), and thine heart hath lifted thee up - i.e., made thee proud, exalted thee above measure - glory of this, and tarry at home - i.e., rest content with the glory which thou hast gained in thy Edomite war; make thy boast thereof, but do not affront fresh dangers - for why shouldest thou meddle to thy hurt - literally, why wilt thou meddle with misfortune? - that thou shouldest fall, even thou, and Judah with thee? Joash was as confident of success, if it came to war, as Amaziah. His three victories over Syria (2 Kings 13:25) were, he thought, at least as good evidence of military strength as Amaziah's one victory over Edom. Amaziah reigned twenty-nine years in the same theocratical spirit as his father Joash, only not like his ancestor David, i.e., according to the correct explanation in 2 Chronicles 25:2, not with שׁלם לבב (see at 1 Kings 11:4), since Amaziah, like his father Joash (see at 2 Kings 12:3), fell into idolatry in the closing years of his reign (cf. 2 Chronicles 25:14.). - Only the high places were not taken away, etc.
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