Exodus 4:13
But Moses replied, "Please, Lord, send someone else."
Sermons
A Servant's DifficultiesJ. Orr Exodus 4:13
An Evasion of Spiritual WorkJ. S. Exell, M. A.Exodus 4:13
The Inventiveness of ReluctanceJ. Parker, D. D.Exodus 4:13
The Joy of Being Used by GodG. F. Pentecost, D. D.Exodus 4:13
Divine Supplements for Human InfirmityH.T. Robjohns Exodus 4:1-17
EloquenceJ. S. Exell, M. A.Exodus 4:10-13
Fluency in SpeechW. M. Taylor, D. D.Exodus 4:10-13
Gifts Other than Eloquence an Element in LeadershipProf. Gaussen.Exodus 4:10-13
God Can Make Use of Poor MaterialExodus 4:10-13
God's Biddings are EnablingsExodus 4:10-13
Inspiration Better than EducationH. O. Mackey.Exodus 4:10-13
LessonsW. M. Taylor, D. D.Exodus 4:10-13
Natural Infirmities in Relation to Moral ServiceJ. S. Exell, M. A.Exodus 4:10-13
Self-ConsciousnessJ. Parker, D. D.Exodus 4:10-13
Slowness of SpeechJ. S. Exell, M. A.Exodus 4:10-13
Speech, or Dumbness, from GodH. Melvill, B. D.Exodus 4:10-13
Strength not Always AppropriateExodus 4:10-13
The Art of the Orator Undesirable in a PreacherSpurgeon, Charles HaddonExodus 4:10-13
The Divine CreatorshipW. M. Taylor, D. D.Exodus 4:10-13
The Objections Made to Religious ServiceJ. S. Exell, M. A.Exodus 4:10-13
Uselessness of Mere WordsRobert Hall.Exodus 4:10-13
Why was Moses not Gifted with Eloquence?M. M. Kalisch, Ph. D.Exodus 4:10-13
God's Wrath Will Fall Where His Service is DeclinedJ. Urquhart Exodus 4:10-17
Slow of SpeechJ. Orr Exodus 4:10-17
Moses, Taking a Step Too Far, is Suddenly ArrestedD. Young Exodus 4:13-16
Observe -

I. WHAT THEY WERE. Moses' difficulties resolved themselves into three.

1. The power of Pharaoh. "Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh?" (Exodus 3:10). We may be staggered by the thought of the powers that are arrayed against us.

2. The anticipated unbelief of the people (ver. 1). The preacher has to encounter hard and unbelieving hearts, and this may enfeeble and dishearten him.

3. His lack of gifts (ver. 10). Humble natures are easily discouraged by the sense of their own short-comings - by the consciousness of ignorance, defective education, lack of gifts of speech, etc.

II. HOW THEY WERE MET.

1. God armed Moses with powers that made him more than a match for the mighty king of Egypt.

2. He gave him the means of overcoming the unbelief of the people.

3. He promised to endow him with power of speech; and, when that was rejected, supplied his defect by giving him a coadjutor. From which learn: -

1. That while it is right to state our difficulties to God - to pour out all our hearts before him - it is wrong to make them an excuse for shrinking from duty.

2. That God, if relied on, will give us all sufficiency. - J.O.







Send, I pray Thee, by the hand of him whom Thou wilt send.
I. MOSES RECOGNIZED THE NECESSITY THAT THE WORK SHOULD BE ACCOMPLISHED.

II. HE MANIFESTED A DISPOSITION TO SHRINK FROM ACHIEVING THE WORK HIMSELF.

III. HE EXPRESSED A DESIRE THAT SOME OTHER PERSON SHOULD BE CALLED TO, AND ENTRUSTED WITH, THE WORK.

IV. HE WAS IN DANGER OF LOSING THE HONOUR OF THE WORK TO WHICH HE WAS CALLED.

(J. S. Exell, M. A.)

I have a letter from a dear Christian lady in this city who refused to speak to an inquirer when I asked her to, on the ground that she could not talk to an inquirer. The next day she was deeply humiliated to think that she had refused to speak to an anxious soul; and the question even of her own acceptance with God came up for discussion in her own mind. "Can I be a child of God, if I am not willing to speak to an anxious soul about Jesus?" She was led by this to cast herself down in consecration to God to be used of Him in any way, and especially in speaking to the anxious. Here is an extract from a letter just received. "I am constrained to tell you that He allowed me on Sunday Night, for the first time, the intense joy of helping to lead a dear soul to Himself. Oh, the rest, and joy, and peace to my own heart, is more than tongue can tell! To think that after being His child for seventeen years, and being cold and useless all that wasted time, He should then be so loving and gracious as to use me, such a worthless cumberer. Oh, it is wonderful! Praise His dear name." Dear friend, would you not like to have a similar experience?

(G. F. Pentecost, D. D.)

Man excusing himself from duty is a familiar picture. It is not a picture indeed; it is a personal experience. How inventive we are in finding excuses for not doing the will of God! How falsely modest we can become! depreciating ourselves, and putting ourselves before God in a light in which we could never consent to be put before society by the criticism of others. Is not this a revelation of the human heart to itself? We only want to walk in paths that are made beautiful with flowers, and to wander by streams that lull us by their own tranquillity. Nerve, and pluck, and force we seem to have lost. In place of the inventiveness of love we have the inventiveness of reluctance or distaste. It should be our supreme delight to find reasons for co-operating with God, and to fortify ourselves by such interpretations of circumstances as will plainly show us that we are in the right battle, fighting on the right side, and wielding the right weapon. The possibility of self-deception is one of the most solemn of all subjects. I cannot question the sincerity of Moses in enumerating and massing all the difficulties of his side of the case. He meant every word that he said. It is not enough to be sincere; we must have intelligence and conscience enlightened and enlarged. Mistakes are made about this matter of sincerity; the thing forgotten being that sincerity is nothing in itself, everything depending upon the motive by which it is actuated and the object towards which it is directed. The Church is to-day afflicted with the spirit of self-excusing: — it cannot give, because of the depression of the times; it cannot go upon its mighty errands, because of its dainty delicateness; it cannot engage in active beneficence, because its charity should begin at home; it cannot enter into ardent controversy, because it prefers the comfort of inaction. Churches should not tell lies to themselves. The first great thing to be done is for a man to be faithful to his own heart, to look himself boldly in the face, and speak the clear truth emphatically to his own consciousness.

(J. Parker, D. D.)

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