Psalm 41:13
Blessed be the LORD God of Israel from everlasting, and to everlasting. Amen, and Amen.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(13) Blessed.—This doxology is no part of the psalm, but a formal close to the first book of the collection. (See General Introduction.)

Psalm 41:13. Blessed be the Lord God of Israel — A God in covenant with his people; who has done great and kind things for them, and has more and better in reserve; from everlasting to everlasting — Or, from age to age, as long as the world lasts, and to all eternity. Amen and amen — Amen, especially a double amen, signifies a hearty assent and approbation, and withal an earnest desire of the thing to which it is annexed. And as the Psalms are divided into five books, so each of them is closed with this word: the first here; the second, Psalms 72 : the third, Psalms 89 : the fourth, Psalms 106 : the last in the end of Psalm cl: the doubling of the word shows the fervency of his spirit in this work of praising God. 41:5-13 We complain, and justly, of the want of sincerity, and that there is scarcely any true friendship to be found among men; but the former days were no better. One particularly, in whom David had reposed great confidence, took part with his enemies. And let us not think it strange, if we receive evil from those we suppose to be friends. Have not we ourselves thus broken our words toward God? We eat of his bread daily, yet lift up the heel against him. But though we may not take pleasure in the fall of our enemies, we may take pleasure in the making vain their designs. When we can discern the Lord's favour in any mercy, personal or public, that doubles it. If the grace of God did not take constant care of us, we should not be upheld. But let us, while on earth, give heartfelt assent to those praises which the redeemed on earth and in heaven render to their God and Saviour.Blessed be the Lord God of Israel - That is, Let the Lord God of Israel be praised, honored, adored. The language is an expression of desire that all honor, all happiness, might be His. It is a recognition of God as the source of the mercies referred to, and an expression of the feeling that he is entitled to universal praise. The word Israel here refers to the people of God as descended from Jacob or Israel.

From everlasting, and to everlasting - Through eternity, or eternal ages, - from all past duration to all future duration. The expression "from everlasting to everlasting," would embrace eternity; and the idea is that God is deserving of eternal praise.

Amen, and amen - The word "amen" means properly surely, certainly, truly, and is a word expressive of solemn affirmation, or of the desire of the mind that this should be so. Its repetition is emphatic, expressing strong assent to what is said as certainly true, or as eminently the wish of the mind. This benediction marks the close of one of the five books into which the Psalms are commonly divided. See the General Introduction, Section 3.

13. Blessed—praised, usually applied to God. The word usually applied to men denotes happiness (Ps 1:1; 32:1). With this doxology the first book closes. From everlasting, and to everlasting; or, from age to age, as long as the world lasts, and to all eternity. Amen signifies a hearty assent and approbation, and withal an earnest desire and confidence, of the thing to which it is annexed. And as the Psalms are divided into five books, so each of them is closed with this word; the first here, the second Psalm 72, the third Psalm 89, the fourth Psalm 106, the last in the end of Psalm 150: the doubling of the word shows the fervency of his spirit in this work of praising God. Blessed be the Lord God of Israel,.... Which is said, either by the Messiah, on account of the delight his Father had in him; the favour he had shown him in raising him from the dead, maintaining his innocence, and exalting him at his own right hand; and for all the blessings of grace the whole Israel of God enjoyed through him: or else by the church, who is meant by Israel, the Lord is the God of in a covenant way; who, hearing such things done to her Lord and head, breaks out into an exclamation of praise, and ascribes blessing and glory to God for them, which is due to him;

from everlasting, and to everlasting; that is, throughout all ages, world without end, Ephesians 3:21.

Amen and Amen; which word, as Kimchi observes, signifies confirmation; and the doubling of it is for the greater confirmation of what is expressed. Here ends the first part of the book of Psalms, which is divided into five parts by the Jews (a).

(a) Midrash Tillim, fol. 2. 1. Kimchi Praefat. in Psal.

Blessed be the LORD God of Israel from everlasting, and to everlasting. {k} Amen, and Amen.

(k) By this repetition he stirs up the faithful to praise God.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
13. This doxology is of course no part of the Psalm, but stands here to mark the close of Book i. Cp. Psalm 72:18-19; Psalm 89:52; Psalm 106:48.

Blessed be the Lord God of Israel] Better as R.V., Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel. Lord answers to the Name Jehovah, and is not an attribute to God of Israel. Cp. David’s doxology, 1 Kings 1:48; 1 Chronicles 29:10; and Solomon’s, 1 Kings 8:15; also Ezra 7:27; Nehemiah 9:5; Luke 1:68.

from everlasting, and to everlasting] From all eternity in the past to all eternity in the future: in the eternal present of the divine existence. Cp. Psalm 90:2; Psalm 93:2; Psalm 103:17.

Amen, and Amen] So it is: the response of the congregation, affirming the ascription of praise on their own behalf (Psalm 106:48).Verse 13. - Blessed be the Lord God of Israel from everlasting and to everlasting. Amen, and Amen. A similar doxology occurs at the end of Psalm 72, 89, and Psalms 106, not (apparently) as part of the psalm to which it is attached, but as a mark of pause and separation. The Psalter is thus divided into five books (comp. Hippolyt., p. 153, edit. Lagarde, "TheHebrews divided the Psalter into five books, so that it is another Pentateuch").



(Heb.: 41:8-10) Continuation of the description of the conduct of the enemies and of the false friend. התלחשׁ, as in 2 Samuel 12:19, to whisper to one another, or to whisper among themselves; the Hithpa. sometimes (cf. Genesis 42:1) has a reciprocal meaning like the Niphal. The intelligence brought out by hypocritical visitors of the invalid concerning his critical condition is spread from mouth to mouth by all who wish him ill as satisfactory news; and in fact in whispers, because at that time caution was still necessary. עלי stands twice in a prominent position in the sense of contra me. רעה לּי belong together: they maliciously invent what will be the very worst for him (going beyond what is actually told them concerning him). In this connection there is a feeling in favour of בּליּעל being intended of an evil fate, according to Psalm 18:5, and not according to Psalm 101:3 (cf. Deuteronomy 15:9) of pernicious or evil thought and conduct. And this view is also supported by the predicate יצוּק בּו: "a matter of destruction, an incurable evil (Hitzig) is poured out upon him," i.e., firmly cast upon him after the manner of casting metal (Job 41:15.), so that he cannot get free from it, and he that has once had to lie down will not again rise up. Thus do we understand אשׁר in Psalm 41:9; there is no occasion to take it as an accusative by departing from the most natural sense, as Ewald does, or as a conjunction, as Hitzig does. Even the man of his peace, or literally of his harmonious relationship (אישׁ שׁלום as in Obadiah 1:7, Jeremiah 20:10; Jeremiah 38:22), on whom he has depended with fullest confidence, who did eat his bread, i.e., was his messmate (cf. Psalm 55:15), has made his heel great against him, lxx ἐμεγάλυνεν ἐπ ̓ ἐμὲ πτερνισμόν. The combination הגדּיל עקב is explained by the fact that עקב is taken in the sense of a thrust with the heel, a kick: to give a great kick, i.e., with a good swing of the foot.
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