Genesis 49:33
And when Jacob had made an end of commanding his sons, he gathered up his feet into the bed, and yielded up the ghost, and was gathered to his people.
Jump to: BarnesBensonBICalvinCambridgeClarkeDarbyEllicottExpositor'sExp DctGaebeleinGSBGillGrayHaydockHastingsHomileticsJFBKDKJTLangeMacLarenMHCMHCWParkerPoolePulpitSermonSCOTTBWESTSK
EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(33) He gathered up his feet into the bed.—This seems to indicate that the events recorded in Genesis 48, 49 all took place at the same time. In Genesis 48:2 we read that Jacob strengthened himself for this great final effort, seating himself upon the bed and placing his feet upon the ground. (See Genesis 49:12.) And now that all was over, wearied with what must have sorely exercised both his feelings and his physical powers, he gathered himself together upon the bed, and probably soon afterwards peaceably passed away to his eternal rest.

Genesis 49:33. And when Jacob had made an end of commanding of his sons — He put himself in a posture for dying; having sat upon the bed-side to bless his sons, the spirit of prophecy bringing fresh oil to his expiring lamp, when that work was done, he gathered up his feet into the bed — That he might lie along, not only as one patiently submitting to the stroke, but as one cheerfully composing himself to rest. He then freely resigned his spirit into the hand of God, the Father of spirits; he yielded up the ghost — And his separated soul went to the assembly of the souls of the faithful, who, after they are delivered from the burden of the flesh, are in joy and felicity; he was gathered to his people.49:28-33 Jacob blessed every one according to the blessings God in after-times intended to bestow upon them. He spoke about his burial-place, from a principle of faith in the promise of God, that Canaan should be the inheritance of his seed in due time. When he had finished both his blessing and his charge, and so had finished his testimony, he addressed himself to his dying work. He gathered up his feet into the bed, not only as one patiently submitting to the stroke, but as one cheerfully composing himself to rest, now that he was weary. He freely gave up his spirit into the hand of God, the Father of spirits. If God's people be our people, death will gather us to them. Under the care of the Shepherd of Israel, we shall lack nothing for body or soul. We shall remain unmoved until our work is finished; then, breathing out our souls into His hands for whose salvation we have waited, we shall depart in peace, and leave a blessing for our children after us.After the benediction Jacob gives directions concerning his burial. "All these are the twelve tribes". This implies that the benedictions refer not to the heads only, but to the whole tribes. "Each according to his blessing." All are blessed, but the form of the blessing is suited to the character of the individual "Bury me with my fathers" - with Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, and Leah. This dying command he now lays on the twelve, as he had before bound Joseph by oath to its performance. "Gathered up his feet into the bed." He had been sitting upright while pronouncing the benedictory address and giving his last directions. He now lies down and calmly breathes his last.

- The Burial of Jacob

10. אטד 'āṭâd Atad, "the buck-thorn."

11. מצרים אבל 'ābêl-mı̂tsrayı̂m, Abel-Mitsraim, "mourning of Mizraim," or meadow of Mizraim.

This chapter records the burial of Jacob and the death of Joseph, and so completes the history of the chosen family, and the third bible for the instruction of man.

33. when Jacob had made an end of commanding his sons—It is probable that he was supernaturally strengthened for this last momentous office of the patriarch, and that when the divine afflatus ceased, his exhausted powers giving way, he yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people. Commanding his sons, to wit, concerning the place of his burial. Whilst he was employed in that most solemn and religious work of blessing his children in the name and by the Spirit of God, he used as reverent a posture as his infirm body would permit, and therefore is supposed to sit upon his bedside with his feet hanging downwards. And when he had finished that great work, and wearied himself with so long speech delivered with a most raised and affected mind, he composed himself to rest, and waited for the comfortable approach of his death, which speedily followed it. And when Jacob had made an end of commanding his sons,.... Had given all the proper directions and instructions concerning his interment in the land of Canaan: he gathered up his feet into the bed; on which he sat while he blessed his sons, and gave orders to them about his burial; but now he gathered up his feet into the bed, laid himself along, and composed himself in a proper posture to die. What authority the Targums of Jonathan and Jerusalem on Genesis 49:21 had for saying this bed was a bed of gold, I know not:

and he yielded up the ghost; he expired, he died an easy death, without any pain or sickness: which Ben Melech says this phrase is expressive of. He died in the year of his age one hundred and forty seven, and not one hundred and forty four, as a Jewish chronologer (t) wrongly puts it, and in the year of the world 2315, and before Christ 1689, according to Bishop Usher (u): and was gathered unto his people:

See Gill on Genesis 49:29.

(t) Ganz. Tzemach David, par. 1. fol. 6. 2.((u) Annales Vet. Test. A. M. 2315.

And when Jacob had made an end of commanding his sons, he {x} gathered up his feet into the bed, and yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people.

(x) By which is signified how quietly he died.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
33. gathered up his feet] Jacob now lay down; he had been sitting. See Genesis 48:2 (E).

yielded up the ghost] Cf. Genesis 25:8 (P). The phrase is an English one. The Hebrew has simply “and expired.” LXX ἐξέλιπε; Lat. obiit.

unto his people] See note on Genesis 25:8. The present passage shews clearly that “to be gathered unto one’s people” is not burial in the ancestral place of sepulture (for the account of Jacob’s burial seventy days later comes in the next chapter); but the soul’s departure to the gathering-place of the deceased members of the family, i.e. Sheôl.Verse 33. - And when Jacob had made an end of commanding his sons, he gathered up his feet into the bed (having on the arrival of Joseph strengthened himself and sat up upon the bed, probably with his feet overhanging its edge), and yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people (vide on Genesis 25:8; 35:29).



"Benjamin - a world, which tears in pieces; in the morning he devours prey, and in the evening he divides spoil." Morning and evening together suggest the idea of incessant and victorious capture of booty (Del.). The warlike character which the patriarch here attributes to Benjamin, was manifested by that tribe, not only in the war which he waged with all the tribes on account of their wickedness in Gibeah (Judges 20), but on other occasions also (Judges 5:14), in its distinguished archers and slingers (Judges 20:16; 1 Chronicles 8:40, 1 Chronicles 8:12; 2 Chronicles 14:8; 2 Chronicles 17:17), and also in the fact that the judge Ehud (Judges 3:15.), and Saul, with his heroic son Jonathan, sprang from this tribe (1 Samuel 11:1-15 and 13; 2 Samuel 1:19.).
Links
Genesis 49:33 Interlinear
Genesis 49:33 Parallel Texts


Genesis 49:33 NIV
Genesis 49:33 NLT
Genesis 49:33 ESV
Genesis 49:33 NASB
Genesis 49:33 KJV

Genesis 49:33 Bible Apps
Genesis 49:33 Parallel
Genesis 49:33 Biblia Paralela
Genesis 49:33 Chinese Bible
Genesis 49:33 French Bible
Genesis 49:33 German Bible

Bible Hub






Genesis 49:32
Top of Page
Top of Page