1 Corinthians 12:7
But the manifestation of the Spirit is given to every man to profit with.
Jump to: BarnesBengelBensonBICalvinCambridgeChrysostomClarkeDarbyExpositor'sExp DctExp GrkGSBGillGrayGuzikHastingsHomileticsICCJFBKellyKJTLangeMacLarenMHCMHCWMeyerPNTPoolePulpitSermonSCOTTBVWSWESTSK
But the manifestation of the Spirit - The word "manifestation" (φανέρωτις fanerōtis) means properly that which makes manifest, conspicuous, or plain; that which illustrates, or makes any thing seen or known. Thus, conduct manifests the state of the heart; and the actions are a manifestation, or "showing forth" of the real feelings. The idea here is, that there is given to those referred to, such gifts. endowments, or graces as shall "manifest" the work and nature of the Spirit's operations on the mind; such endowments as the Spirit makes himself known by to people. All that he produces in the mind is a manifestation of his character and work, in the same way as the works of God in the visible creation are a manifestation of his perfections.

Is given to every man - To every man whose case is here under consideration. The idea is not at all that the manifestation of the Spirit is given to all people indiscriminately, to pagans, and infidels, and scoffers as well as to Christians. The apostle is discoursing only of those who are Christians, and his declaration should be confined to them alone. Whatever may be true of other people, this statement should be confined wholly to Christians, and means simply that the Spirit of God gives to each Christian such graces and endowments as he pleases; that he distributes his gifts to all, not equally, but in a manner which he shall choose; and that the design of this is, that all Christians should use his endowments for the common good. This passage, therefore, is very improperly adduced to prove that the gifts and graces of the Holy Spirit are conferred alike on all people, and that pagans, and blasphemers, and sinners in general are under his enlightening influences. It has no reference to any such doctrine, but should be interpreted as referring solely to Christians, and the various endowments which are conferred on them.

To profit withal - (πρὸς τὸ συμθέρον pros to sumtheron). Unto profit; that is, for utility, or use; or to be an advantage to the church; for the common good of all. This does not mean that each one must cultivate and improve his graces and gifts, however true that may be, but that they are to be used for the common good of the church; they are bestowed "for utility," or "profit;" they are conferred in such measures and in such a manner as are best adapted to be useful, and to do good. They are bestowed not on all equally, but in such a manner as shall best subserve the interests of piety and the church, and as shall tend harmoniously to carry on the great interests of religion, and further the welfare of the whole Christian body. The doctrine of this verse is, therefore:

(1) That the Holy Spirit bestows such endowments on all Christians as he pleases; and,

(2) That the design is, in the best manner to promote the common welfare - the peace and edification of the whole church.

It follows from this:

(1) That no Christian should be unduly elated, as if he were more worthy than others, since his endowments are the simple gift of God;

(2) That no Christian should be depressed and disheartened, as if he occupied an inferior or unimportant station, since his place has also been assigned him by God;

(3) That all should be contented, and satisfied with their allotments in the church, and should strive only to make the best use of their talents and endowments; and,

(4) That all should employ their time and talents for the common utility; for the furtherance of the common welfare, and the advancement of the kingdom of Christ on earth.

The manifestation of the Spirit - Φανερωσις του Πνευματος. This is variably understood by the fathers; some of them rendering φανερωσις by illumination, others demonstration, and others operation. The apostle's meaning seems to be this: Whatever gifts God has bestowed, or in what various ways soever the Spirit of God may have manifested himself, it is all for the common benefit of the Church. God has given no gift to any man for his own private advantage, or exclusive profit. He has it for the benefit of others as well as for his own salvation. But the manifestation of the Spirit,.... Not that which the Spirit manifests, as the grace and love of God, an interest in Christ, the doctrines of the Gospel, and the things of another world; for he is a spirit of revelation, more or less, in the knowledge of these things; but that which manifests that a man has the Spirit of God; or rather the gifts of the Spirit, as the fruits and graces of the Spirit, the least measure of which, as being able to say that Jesus is Lord, shows that a man has the Spirit of God; or rather the gifts of the Spirit, ordinary or extraordinary, which are such as manifestly declare their author:

is given to every man; not that the special grace of the Spirit is given to every individual man in the world, nor to every member of a visible church, for some are sensual, not having the Spirit; but as the same graces of the Spirit are given to every regenerate man, for all receive the same spirit of faith, so the gifts of the Spirit, more or less, either ordinary or extraordinary, are given to all such persons;

to profit withal; not to make gain of, as Simon Magus intended, could he have been possessed of them; nor to encourage pride or envy, or to form and foment divisions and parties; but for profit and advantage, and that not merely private, or a man's own, but public, the good of the whole community or church, to which the least grace or gift, rightly used, may contribute.

But the manifestation of the Spirit is {f} given to every man to {g} profit withal.

(f) The Holy Spirit opens and shows himself freely in the giving of these gifts.

(g) To the use and benefit of the church.

7. But—Though all the gifts flow from the one God, Lord, and Spirit, the "manifestation" by which the Spirit acts (as He is hidden in Himself), varies in each individual.

to every man—to each of the members of the Church severally.

to profit withal—with a view to the profit of the whole body.

12:1-11 Spiritual gifts were extraordinary powers bestowed in the first ages, to convince unbelievers, and to spread the gospel. Gifts and graces greatly differ. Both were freely given of God. But where grace is given, it is for the salvation of those who have it. Gifts are for the advantage and salvation of others; and there may be great gifts where there is no grace. The extraordinary gifts of the Holy Spirit were chiefly exercised in the public assemblies, where the Corinthians seem to have made displays of them, wanting in the spirit of piety, and of Christian love. While heathens, they had not been influenced by the Spirit of Christ. No man can call Christ Lord, with believing dependence upon him, unless that faith is wrought by the Holy Ghost. No man could believe with his heart, or prove by a miracle, that Jesus was Christ, unless by the Holy Ghost. There are various gifts, and various offices to perform, but all proceed from one God, one Lord, one Spirit; that is, from the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, the origin of all spiritual blessings. No man has them merely for himself. The more he profits others, the more will they turn to his own account. The gifts mentioned appear to mean exact understanding, and uttering the doctrines of the Christian religion; the knowledge of mysteries, and skill to give advice and counsel. Also the gift of healing the sick, the working of miracles, and to explain Scripture by a peculiar gift of the Spirit, and ability to speak and interpret languages. If we have any knowledge of the truth, or any power to make it known, we must give all the glory of God. The greater the gifts are, the more the possessor is exposed to temptations, and the larger is the measure of grace needed to keep him humble and spiritual; and he will meet with more painful experiences and humbling dispensations. We have little cause to glory in any gifts bestowed on us, or to despise those who have them not. 12:7 But the manifestation of the Spirit. However varied these manifestations, all are

given to every man to profit withal. For the profit of the whole body. No gift of the Spirit is for the benefit of the recipient. This is now shown.

Verse 7. - To profit withal. With reference, that is, to the general profit.

1 Corinthians 14:5,12,17,19,22-26 I would that you all spoke with tongues but rather that you prophesied…

Matthew 25:14 For the kingdom of heaven is as a man traveling into a far country, …

Romans 12:6-8 Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given …

Ephesians 4:7-12 But to every one of us is given grace according to the measure of …

1 Peter 4:10,11 As every man has received the gift, even so minister the same one …

12:7 The manifestation - The gift whereby the Spirit manifests itself. Is given to each - For the profit of the whole body.
Links
1 Corinthians 12:7 NIV
1 Corinthians 12:7 NLT
1 Corinthians 12:7 ESV
1 Corinthians 12:7 NASB
1 Corinthians 12:7 KJV

1 Corinthians 12:7 Bible Apps
1 Corinthians 12:7 Parallel
1 Corinthians 12:7 Biblia Paralela
1 Corinthians 12:7 Chinese Bible
1 Corinthians 12:7 French Bible
1 Corinthians 12:7 German Bible

Bible Hub
1 Corinthians 12:6
Top of Page
Top of Page