1 Kings 16:7
And also by the hand of the prophet Jehu the son of Hanani came the word of the LORD against Baasha, and against his house, even for all the evil that he did in the sight of the LORD, in provoking him to anger with the work of his hands, in being like the house of Jeroboam; and because he killed him.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(7) And also.—This second reference to the prophecy of Jehu seems to be a note of the historian—perhaps added chiefly for the sake of the last clause, which shows that Baasha’s act, though foretold, was not thereby justified.

1 Kings 16:7. And also by the hand of the Prophet Jehu — The order of the narrative seems to be here much confused, to restore which Houbigant places this seventh verse before the fifth and sixth. Came the word of the Lord against Baasha — The meaning is, the message which came from the Lord to Jehu, (1 Kings 16:1-4,) was here delivered by the hand, that is, the ministry of Jehu unto Baasha. Jehu did what God commanded in this matter, though it was not without apparent hazard to himself. And because he killed him — That is, Nadab; who though he be not expressed, is sufficiently understood. But why is he punished for doing God’s work? Because, 1st, Though God appointed that Jeroboam’s family should be cut off, yet he did not give Baasha commission to do it. 2d, Baasha did this not to fulfil God’s will, but his own lusts. See on 1 Kings 16:2.16:1-14 This chapter relates wholly to the kingdom of Israel, and the revolutions of that kingdom. God calls Israel his people still, though wretchedly corrupted. Jehu foretells the same destruction to come upon Baasha's family, which that king had been employed to bring upon the family of Jeroboam. Those who resemble others in their sins, may expect to resemble them in the plagues they suffer, especially those who seem zealous against such sins in others as they allow in themselves. Baasha himself dies in peace, and is buried with honour. Herein plainly appears that there are punishments after death, which are most to be dreaded. Let Elah be a warning to drunkards, who know not but death may surprise them. Death easily comes upon men when they are drunk. Besides the diseases which men bring themselves into by drinking, when in that state, men are easily overcome by an enemy, and liable to bad accidents. Death comes terribly upon men in such a state, finding them in the act of sin, and unfitted for any act of devotion; that day comes upon them unawares. The word of God was fulfilled, and the sins of Baasha and Elah were reckoned for, with which they provoked God. Their idols are called their vanities, for idols cannot profit nor help; miserable are those whose gods are vanities.The natural position of this verse would be after 1 Kings 16:4 and before 1 Kings 16:5. But it may be regarded as added by the writer, somewhat irregularly, as an afterthought; its special force being to point out that the sentence on Baasha was intended to punish, not only his calf-worship, but emphatically his murder of Jeroboam and his family. Though the destruction of Jeroboam had been foretold, and though Baasha may be rightly regarded as God's instrument to punish Jeroboam's sins, yet, as he received no command to execute God's wrath on the offender, and was instigated solely by ambition and self-interest, his guilt was just as great as if no prophecy had been uttered. Even Jehu's commission 2 Kings 9:5-10 was not held to justify, altogether, his murder of Jehoram and Jezebel. 7. also by the hand of the prophet Jehu—This is not another prophecy, but merely an addition by the sacred historian, explanatory of the death of Baasha and the extinction of his family. The doom pronounced against Jeroboam (1Ki 14:9), did not entitle him to take the execution of the sentence into his own hands; but from his following the same calf-worship, he had evidently plotted the conspiracy and murder of that king in furtherance of his own ambitious designs; and hence, in his own assassination, he met the just reward of his deeds. The similitude to Jeroboam extends to their deaths as well as their lives—the reign of their sons, and the ruin of their families. By the hand of the prophet Jehu came the word of the Lord: the meaning is, the message which came from the Lord to Jehu, 1 Kings 16:1, &c., was here delivered by the hand, i.e. the ministry, of Jehu, unto Baasha. Jehu did what God commanded him in this matter, though it was not without apparent hazard to himself.

And because he killed him, i.e. Nadab; who, though he be not expressed, yet is sufficiently understood:

1. By the manifest reference which these words have to the murder committed by Baasha, which was done upon Nadab only, 1 Kings 15:28.

2. By the foregoing words,

the house of Jeroboam, i.e. his posterity, which was Nadab.

Quest. Why doth God punish him for doing God’s work?

Answ. 1. Though God appointed that Jeroboam’s family should be cut off, yet he did not give Baasha commission to do it, nor had declared how or by whom he would do it.

2. Baasha did this not to fulfil God’s will, but his own lusts. See Poole "1 Kings 16:2". And also by the hand of the prophet Jehu, the son of Hanani, came the word of the Lord against Baasha, and against his house,.... Which is here repeated, as Abarbinel thinks, because in the former prophecy the threatening was on account not of his own sin, but because he made Israel to sin; but here it is because of his own evil works, as it follows:

even for all the evil that he did in the sight of the Lord, in provoking him to anger with the work of his hands, in being like the house of Jeroboam: worshipping the golden calves as they did:

and because he killed him; either Jeroboam; for, according to Dr. Lightfoot (b), he was alive this year; rather Nadab the son of Jeroboam, who it is certain was slain by Baasha; though it may refer, as Abarbinel thinks, to the whole house of Jeroboam; though it was agreeable to the will of God, yet was not done by Baasha with any regard to it, but to gratify his malice and ambition, and therefore punishable for it.

(b) Works, vol. 1. p. 79.

And also {c} by the hand of the prophet Jehu the son of Hanani came the word of the LORD against Baasha, and against his house, even for all the evil that he did in the sight of the LORD, in provoking him to anger with the work of his hands, in being like the house of Jeroboam; and because he killed {d} him.

(c) That is, the prophet did his message.

(d) Meaning, Nadab Jeroboam's son.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
7. And also [R.V. moreover] by the hand of the prophet Jehu] ‘Moreover’ connects the two prophetic messages more directly than the ‘also’ of A. V. The LXX. omits the words ‘the prophet.’

even for (R.V. both because of] all the evil] There are two reasons given for the divine message sent to Baasha. They are both prefaced by the same preposition in the original = because, and it makes the verse clearer if the same word be used in both clauses in the translation.

and because he killed [R.V. smote] him] The R.V. gives on the margin ‘it’ for ‘him.’ The reference must be to Jeroboam and his house. God had raised up Baasha, and sent him against Jeroboam, but it is clear from this verse that the manner in which punishment had been inflicted by Baasha was not such as God approved of. We may compare with this the language of Isaiah (Isaiah 47:6) where God by the mouth of His prophet declares His wrath against His people, and how He delivered them into the hand of the king of Babylon, but at the same time shews His anger with the conqueror for the way in which he had exercised cruelty; “Thou didst shew them no mercy.”

The R.V. has rendered the verb ‘smote’ because it is so rendered in 1 Kings 15:27; 1 Kings 15:29, about the destruction of Jeroboam and of his house.Verse 7. - And also by the hand of the prophet Jehu, the son of Hanani, came the word of the Lord against Baasha [This does not refer, as some have thought, to a second prophecy on Jehu's part, but is rather explicative of ver. 2. Rawlinson thinks the object of the historian herein was to point out that Baasha was punished for the "murder of Jeroboam [?] and his family," as well as for the calf worship. Keil and Bahr hold that it is designed to guard against a perversion of ver. 2, "I made thee prince," etc., from which it might be inferred that he was commissioned of God to murder Nadab. But it is simpler to suppose that his primary idea was to convey, by this repetition, which no doubt is derived from a different source from the statement of ver. 2, that Baasha was visited by God for his various sins. It was no chance that happened to him. The excision of his house, like that of Jeroboam, was distinctly foretold], and against his house, even for all the evil that he did in the sight of the Lord, in provoking him to anger with the work of his hands [ver. 2; note the coincidence with 1 Kings 15:30, in connexion with the next words. Bahr explains "the works of his hands "as idols, Dii factitii, after Deuteronomy 4:28, but this appears somewhat far fetched], in being like the house of Jeroboam, and because he killed him [i.e., Nadab]. The Reign of Elah. 1 Kings 16:7 adds a supplementary remark concerning the words of Jehu (1 Kings 16:2.), not to preclude an excuse that might be made, in which case וגם would have to be taken in the sense of nevertheless, or notwithstanding (Ewald, 354, a.), but to guard against a misinterpretation by adding a new feature, or rather to preclude an erroneous inference that might be drawn from the words, "I (Jehovah) have made thee prince" (1 Kings 16:2), as through Baasha had exterminated Nadab and his house by divine command (Thenius). וגם simply means "and also," and is not to be connected specially with יהוּא בּיד, but to be taken as belonging to the whole sentence: "also the word of Jehovah had come to Baasha through Jehu, ... not only because of the evil, etc., but also (ועל...ועל) because he had slain him (Jeroboam)." With regard to this last reason, we must call to mind the remark made at 1 Kings 11:39, viz., that the prediction of the prophet to Baasha gave him no right to put himself forward arbitrarily as the fulfiller of the prophecy. The very fact that Baasha continued Jeroboam's sin and caused the illegal worship to be perpetuated, showed clearly enough that in exterminating the family of Jeroboam he did not act under divine direction, but simply pursued his own selfish ends.
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