Isaiah 26:4
Trust you in the LORD for ever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is everlasting strength:
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(4) For in the Lord Jehovah.—The Hebrew presents, as in Isaiah 12:2, the exceptional combination of the two names Jah (Psalm 68:4) and Jehovah. In the Hebrew for “everlasting strength,” we have, literally, the Rock of Ages of the well-known hymn. We have the same name of Rock applied to express the unchangeableness of God, as in Deuteronomy 32:4.

26:1-4 That day, seems to mean when the New Testament Babylon shall be levelled with the ground. The unchangeable promise and covenant of the Lord are the walls of the church of God. The gates of this city shall be open. Let sinners then be encouraged to join to the Lord. Thou wilt keep him in peace; in perfect peace, inward peace, outward peace, peace with God, peace of conscience, peace at all times, in all events. Trust in the Lord for that peace, that portion, which will be for ever. Whatever we trust to the world for, it will last only for a moment; but those who trust in God shall not only find in him, but shall receive from him, strength that will carry them to that blessedness which is for ever. Let us then acknowledge him in all our ways, and rely on him in all trials.Trust ye in the Lord for ever - The sense is, 'Let your confidence in God on no occasion fail. Let no calamity, no adversity, no persecution, no poverty, no trial of any kind, prevent your reposing entire confidence in him.' This is spoken evidently in view of the fact stated in the previous verse, that the mind that is stayed on him shall have perfect peace.

For in the Lord Jehovah - 'This is one of the four places where our translators have retained the original word Yahweh (compare Exodus 6:3; Psalm 133:1-3 :18; the notes at Isaiah 12:2). The original is יהוה ביה beyâhh yehovâh; the first word, יה yâhh, (compare Psalm 68:4), being merely an abridged form of Yahweh. The same form occurs in Isaiah 12:2. The union of these two forms seems designed to express, in the highest sense possible, the majesty, glory, and holiness of God; to excite the highest possible reverence where language fails of completely conveying the idea.

Is everlasting strength - Hebrew as in the Margin, 'The rock of ages;' a more poetic and beautiful expression than in our translation. The idea is, that God is firm and unchangeable like an eternal rock; and that in him we may find protection and defense for everlasting ages (see Deuteronomy 32:4, et al.; 1 Samuel 2:2; 2 Samuel 22:32, 2 Samuel 22:47; 2 Samuel 23:3; Psalm 18:31; Psalm 19:14; Psalm 28:1; Psalm 42:9; Psalm 62:2, Psalm 62:6-7, ..., where God is called 'a rock').

4. Lord Jehovah—Hebrew, Jah, Jehovah. The union of the two names expresses in the highest degree God's unchanging love and power (compare Ps 68:4). This passage, and Isa 12:2; Ex 6:3; Ps 83:18, are the four in which the English Version retains the Jehovah of the original. Maurer translates, "For Jah (the eternal unchangeable One, Ex 3:14) is Jehovah, the rock of ages" (compare Isa 45:17; De 32:15; 1Sa 2:2). For ever; in all times and conditions.

Everlasting strength, Heb. the Rock of ages; a sure refuge to all those that trust in him, through all generations; therefore you may safely trust in him, and that for ever. Trust ye in the Lord for ever,.... In the Word of the Lord for ever and ever, as the Targum again; that is, at all times, in every state and condition, in times of affliction, temptation, and darkness; for he will support under, and in his own time deliver out of every trouble, and cause all things to work to gether for good; and trust in him always, for everything, for all temporal blessings, and for all spiritual ones, and for eternal life and happiness; for he has them, has promised them, and will give them:

for in the Lord JEHOVAH is everlasting strength; Christ is the Lord JEHOVAH, which is, and was, and is to come, self-existent, eternal, and immutable; and in him is strength, as well as righteousness for his people; and that for everything it is wanted for, to bear up under temptations and afflictions, to withstand every spiritual enemy, to exercise every grace, and discharge every duty: and this strength is everlasting; it always continues in him, and is always to be had from him; he is the "eternal" God, who is the refuge of his people, and his "arms" of power and might "underneath" them are "everlasting": the words may be rendered, "for in Jah" is "Jehovah, the Rock of ages" (q); Jehovah the Son is in Jehovah the Father, according to John 10:38 or "Jah Jehovah" is "the Rock of ages", so Vitringa; he is the "Rock" on which the church and every believer is built, against which "the gates of hell cannot prevail"; and he has been the Rock of his people in ages past, and will be in ages to come: or "of worlds"; this world, and that to come; and so it is explained in the Talmud (r), he that trusts in the Lord has a refuge in this world, and in the world to come.

(q) "in Jah est Jehovah, rupes saeculorum". (r) T. Bab. Menachot, fol. 29. 2.

Trust ye in the LORD for ever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is everlasting strength:
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
4. for in the Lord JEHOVAH is everlasting strength] Render: for Yah Yahveh (see on Isaiah 12:2) is an everlasting Rock (lit. “a Rock of Ages”). The preposition in may be omitted in English (Bêth essentiae).Verse 4. - Trust ye in the Lord. The faithful exhort each other to perfect trust, in the new Jerusalem, as in the old (see Psalm 115:9-11). In the Lord Jehovah; literally, in Jab Jehorah (comp. Isaiah 12:2). Is everlasting strength; literally, is the Rock of ages. A certain refuge throughout all eternity is, no doubt, intended (see the comment on Isaiah 17:10). In the land of promise there is rejoicing, but on the other side of the Jordan there is fear of ruin. Two contrasted pictures are placed here side by side. The Jordan is the same as the "great gulf" in the parable of the rich man. Upon Zion Jehovah descends in mercy, but upon the highlands of Moab in His wrath. "For the hand of Jehovah will sink down upon this mountain, and Moab is trodden down there where it is, as straw is trodden down in the water of the dung-pit. And he spreadeth out his hands in the pool therein, as the swimmer spreadeth them out to swim; but Jehovah forceth down the pride of Moab in spite of the artifices of his hands. Yea, thy steep, towering walls He bows down, forces under, and casts earthwards into dust." Jehovah brings down His hand upon Zion (nūach, as in Isaiah 7:2; Isaiah 11:1), not only to shelter, but also to avenge. Israel, that has been despised, He now makes glorious, and for contemptuous Moab He prepares a shameful end. In the place where it now is תּחתּיו, as in 2 Samuel 7:10; Habakkuk 3:16, "in its own place," its own land) it is threshed down, stamped or trodden down, as straw is trodden down into a dung-pit to turn it into manure: hiddūsh, the inf. constr., with the vowel sound u, possibly to distinguish it from the inf. absol. hiddosh (Ewald, 240, b). Instead of בּמו (as in Isaiah 43:2), the chethib has בּמי (cf., Job 9:30); and this is probably the more correct reading, since madmēnâh, by itself, means the dunghill, and not the tank of dung water. At the same time, it is quite possible that b'mo is intended as a play upon the name Moab, just as the word madmēnâh may possibly have been chosen with a play upon the Moabitish Madmēn (Jeremiah 48:2). In Isaiah 25:11 Jehovah would be the subject, if b'kirbo (in the midst of it) referred back to Moab; but although the figure of Jehovah pressing down the pride of Moab, by spreading out His hands within it like a swimmer, might produce the impression of boldness and dignity in a different connection, yet here, where Moab has just been described as forced down into the manure-pit, the comparison of Jehovah to a swimmer would be a very offensive one. The swimmer is Moab itself, as Gesenius, Hitzig, Knobel, and in fact the majority of commentators suppose. "In the midst of it:" b'kirbo points back in a neuter sense to the place into which Moab had been violently plunged, and which was so little adapted for swimming. A man cannot swim in a manure pond; but Moab attempts it, though without success, for Jehovah presses down the pride of Moab in spite of its artifices עם, as in Nehemiah 5:18; ארבּות, written with dagesh (according to the majority of MSS, from ארבּה, like the Arabic urbe, irbe, cleverness, wit, sharpness), i.e., the skilful and cunning movement of its hands. Saad. gives it correctly, as muchâtale, wiles and stratagems; Hitzig also renders it "machinations," i.e., twistings and turnings, which Moab makes with its arms, for the purpose of keeping itself up in the water. What Isaiah 25:11 affirms in figure, Isaiah 25:12 illustrates without any figure. If the reading were מבצרך חומות משׂגּב, the reference would be to Kir-Moab (Isaiah 15:1; Isaiah 16:7). But as the text stands, we are evidently to understand by it the strong and lofty walls of the cities of Moab in general.
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