Philippians 1:15
It is true that some preach Christ out of envy and rivalry, but others out of goodwill.
Sermons
A Spurious MinistryG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:15
Allowable ContentionLord Bacon.Philippians 1:15
An Imprisoned Preacher's ThoughtsH. W. Beecher.Philippians 1:15
Christ Preached by LoveBoree.Philippians 1:15
Christ Really Though Inadequately PreachedH. W. Beecher.Philippians 1:15
Evangelical CongratulationW. Brock, D. D.Philippians 1:15
Goodwill the Spirit Common to the Brotherhood of the Christian MinistryG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:15
Love of Christ and the Brethren the Essential Qualification for Preaching ChristG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:15
MotivesJ. Lyth, D. D., J. Parker, D. D.Philippians 1:15
ObserveJ. Lyth, D. D.Philippians 1:15
ObserveJ. Lyth, D. D.Philippians 1:15
Paul's Joy in the Preaching of His EnemiesH. W. Beecher.Philippians 1:15
Power of Christ PreachedWilliam Arnot.Philippians 1:15
Power of the Bible Even in Faulty VersionsAnstera.Philippians 1:15
The Defence of the GospelJ. Lyth, D. D.Philippians 1:15
The Influence of the GospelBp. Ryle.Philippians 1:15
The Motives of Paul's EnemiesJ. Daille.Philippians 1:15
The Opponents of St. PaulProfessor Eadie.Philippians 1:15
The Preaching of ChristJ. Lyth, D. D., W. B. Collyer, D. D.Philippians 1:15
The Preaching of Christ a Reason for Joy and Holy ExultationIsaac Mann, M. A.Philippians 1:15
The Preaching of Christ by Whatever Lips a Source of Satisfaction to ChristiansOliver Cromwell.Philippians 1:15
The Real and Counterfeit in the Christian MinistryG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:15
TolerationH. W. Beecher.Philippians 1:15
Two Voices on the Same SubjectJ. Parker, D. D.Philippians 1:15
A Grand Principle and a Splendid ExampleD. Thomas Philippians 1:12-18
Bonds in ChristJ. Lyth, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
Character of St. Paul's CaptivityBishop Lightfoot., Conybeare and Howson.Philippians 1:12-20
Christian BoldnessG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:12-20
Expectations Unexpectedly FulfilledT. C. Finlayson.Philippians 1:12-20
Good Out of EvilJ. Daille.Philippians 1:12-20
Hindrances as HelpsJ. F. B. Tinling, B. A.Philippians 1:12-20
Irresistible Moral InfluenceG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:12-20
Ministerial LifeG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:12-20
Paul's Bonds in Christ ExhibitedG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:12-20
Paul's CaptivityJ. Hutchinson, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
Paul's Sorrows and JoysJ. Lyth, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
The Advantage of DisadvantageJohn Bunyan, in Bedford Jail.Philippians 1:12-20
The Furtherance of the GospelJ. Hutchinson, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
The Gospel Furthered by OppositionJ. Lyth, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
The Gospel in RomeJ. J. Goadby.Philippians 1:12-20
The Gospel in RomeR. Johnstone, LL. B.Philippians 1:12-20
The Gospel Promoted by PersecutionR.M. Edgar Philippians 1:12-20
The Ministry of Paul the PrisonerG. G. Ballard.Philippians 1:12-20
The Powerlessness of PersecutionH. Airay, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
The Things that have Happened unto Me have Fallen Out Rather unto the Furtherance of the GospelJ. Parker, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
The Triumphs of the GospelJ. Lyth, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
Things Concerning HimselfW. B. Pope, D. D.Philippians 1:12-20
Unfavourable Circumstance, May be Turned to AdvantageC. H. Spurgeon.Philippians 1:12-20
Thoughts Suggested by His CaptivityR. Finlayson Philippians 1:12-30
A Significant Difference Among the Apostle's BrethrenT. Croskery Philippians 1:15-18
The Spirit of FactionV. Hutton Philippians 1:15-18
They were all actively engaged in preaching the gospel, but they were not actuated by the same motives.

I. THE DIFFERENT SPIRIT OF THE TWO CLASSES OF PREACHERS. "Some indeed preach Christ even of envy and strife; and some also of good will." The one class were actuated by a genuine good will to Christ and his apostle. The other class were actuated by envy and discord. They envied the popularity of the apostle among the Gentile Churches, and showed a disagreeably quarrelsome temper. They were evidently Judaists who could little brook the overthrow of the Mosaic institute and Jewish commonwealth which seemed to be involved in the triumph of the apostle's gospel. Yet they preached Christ.

II. THE MOTIVES OF THE TWO CLASSES. "The one do it of love, knowing that I am set for the defense of the gospel; but the other proclaim Christ of faction, not sincerely, thinking to raise up affliction for me in my bonds." Notice:

1. The pure motive of one class - love - which ought to be the spring of all gospel action. Love to Christ, love to the truth, love to the souls of men, ought to be the abiding motive of all preachers. These brethren had special regard for the apostle on account of his destined place in the evangelization of the world.

2. The impure motive of the other class - a base partisanship designed to make the apostle's bonds more galling. There are allusions to this fierce party spirit among the Judaists in most of the apostle's writings, aggravated as it often was by intense bitterness to the apostle.

3. Yet both classes preached Christ. The language of the apostle is applied to both classes. It is sad to think of men preaching Christ from bad motives, especially where Erich motives may imply a tinge of doctrinal imperfection in the method of preaching him. Yet the Lord accepts the services of weak, imperfect, sinful men in his vineyard.

III. THE JOY OF THE APOSTLE AT THIS WIDESPREAD ACTIVITY OF THE TWO CLASSES.

1. It might appear more natural for him to denounce these Judaists with words of sharp rebuke. Perhaps his own enforced inactivity as a preacher may have led him to rejoice in the Christian labors of men who knew Christ "only after the flesh."

2. His joy shows a large and forgiving nature. "What then? only that in every way, whether with masked design or in truth, Christ is proclaimed, and therein I rejoice, yea, and will rejoice." The conduct of the apostle teaches us:

(1) That the preaching of Christ is higher truth than the secondary questions of polity and worship which often cause dissension among Christians.

(2) That Christians ought to rejoice in the successes of other Christians who follow different methods of doctrine or polity.

(3) That it is right to condemn the base motives or unworthy insincerities that sometimes mingle with good work.

(4) That we ought to show special consideration to those who preach Christ of good will, and eschew all sorts of by-ends and manoeuvres. - T.C.







Some indeed preach Christ even of envy and strife
I.A GOOD ACT MAY BE PROMPTED BY A BAD MOTIVE.

II.THE GOOD REMAINS THOUGH THE OBJECT FAILS.

(J. Lyth, D. D.)

I.VARY WIDELY.

II.DO NOT AFFECT THE NATURE BUT THE MORAL QUALITY OF AN ACTION.

III.DETERMINE NOT THE RESULT BUT THE REWARD.

(J. Lyth, D. D.)The text suggests —

I. DIVERSE DEVELOPEMENT OF HUMAN DISPOSITION.

II. THE POSSIBILITY OF DOING A GOOD DEED THROUGH A BAD MOTIVE.

III. THE IMPOSSIBILITY OF ENTIRELY CONCEALING MOTIVES.

IV. THE ACTION OF SELF-SEEKERS TURNED INTO THE GOOD MAN'S SOURCE OF JOY.

V. MAN IS NEVER SO DIABOLIZED AS WHEN MAKING A GOOD CAUSE THE MEANS OF GRIEVING AND TORMENTING THE CHURCH.

VI. THE MERE FACT THAT A MAN PREACHES CHRIST IS NOT A PROOF OF HIS PERSONAL SALVATION: and if this can be affirmed of preaching, how much more may it be affirmed of learning.

(J. Parker, D. D.)

I.The voice of SELFISHNESS.

II.The voice of LOVE.

(J. Parker, D. D.)

I. WHERE THEY CORRESPOND.

1. Both adopt the Christian name.

2. Both utter the same shibboleth.

3. Both are active in preaching Christ.

II. WHERE THEY DIFFER.

1. In heart. "Contention" moves the one; "love" reigns in the other.

2. In spirit. "Envy and strife" move the one; "goodwill" actuates the other.

3. In source of strength. Love of party animates the one; confidence in the Lord emboldens the other.

4. In aim. That of the one is to advance, it may be, a lifeless Church; that of the other to propel the gospel of Christ.

5. The depth and accuracy of conviction. The one "supposing to rid," etc. (ver. 16); the other "knowing that," etc. (ver. 17).

(G. G. Ballard.)

I. THE ELEMENTS FORMATIVE OF IT.

1. An imperfect apprehension of Christ's mission.

2. A total absence of Christ's Spirit.

3. Thought and sympathy, narrowed by early prejudice and preconceived ideas.

4. Christ made subservient to the doctrines, ritual, and history of a system.

II. THE RESULTS INSEPARABLE FROM IT.

1. The cross degraded into a rallying point for party strife.

2. The basest spirit indulged under the pretence of fulfilling a sacred office.

(1)"Envy" — displeasure at another's good.

(2)"Strife" — selfish rivalry which seeks to gain the good belonging to another. Christ preached merely to advance a party.

4. Zeal for propagating a creed, greater than to save a lost world.

III. THE GERM OF IT.

1. May exist in those who zealously preach Christ.

2. Consists in a moral contradiction between the heart of the preacher and the theme of his discourse — contentiousness and Christ.

3. Produces impurity of motive in Christian work — "not sincerely."

4. Biases the judgment to expect results which are never realized — "supposing."

5. Inspires aims which are unchristian — "to add affliction."

(G. G. Ballard.)

I. THE THEME. His person and work — His grace and power — His gifts and promises — His example and requirements.

II. THE MOTIVE. Sometimes impure; as sectarian, mercenary, ambitious — sometimes sincere; from love to God and man.

III. THE RESULT. Some good every way — Christ is exalted — the faithful rejoice,

(J. Lyth, D. D.)

I. THE PREACHING OF CHRIST. No preaching can bear this designation which does not constitute Him the grand object of it. From the first the holy men who spoke as they were moved by the Holy Spirit pointed to Him. All the Scriptures lead, remotely, perhaps, but certainly, to the Cross of Christ. He is to be preached as the only object of faith, and the sole source of salvation. Opposition must not hinder, nor heresy divert this.

II. THE SCALE ON WHICH CHRIST IS TO BE PREACHED.

1. To all peoples — Philippians and Romans, Europeans and Africans.

2. By men of all views and denominations, Jewish and Gentile Christians; Roman Catholics and Protestants; Anglicans and Dissenters, etc.

III. THE SPIRIT IN WHICH THIS SHOULD BE RECEIVED. There are two classes interested.

1. Ministers should rejoice when they see the gospel spreading on all sides and among all denominations. Let it not be said of them, "Ye know not what spirit ye are off." No jealous or envious feeling at others' successes should be cherished by them.

2. Congregations while loyal to their own Church should put a generous construction on the work of others.

IV. THE GLORIOUS RESULTS ARISING OUT OF THIS.

1. In time.

2. In eternity.

(W. B. Collyer, D. D.)

I. We see here the TRUE GROUND OF CHRISTIAN TOLERATION.

1. Negatively.(1) Toleration is not an enforced forbearance with men who teach error. Some keep their hands off errorists because they cannot touch them; like boys who will not pluck ripe fruit because there is a high wall in the way.(2) Nor is it a recognition of the right of men to freedom of thought and experience, which is only part of it.(3) Still less is it indifference to error. There are men who do not care whether you teach God or Jupiter, heathen mythology or Christian theology.

2. Positively. It is a generous confidence in the vitality of truth and its ultimate victory, born of hope, nursed by courage, adopted by love.

II. IF PAUL'S SPIRIT BE RIGHT THEN WE NEED TO AMEND OUR VIEW OF SOCIAL AND MORAL RESPONSIBILITY. He saw bad men taking his place yet he let them go on, rejoiced in their work, though not in the motive of it. Had he lived in our day he would have been told, "You cannot afford to sit in a Church where these men teach or you will be responsible for their teaching." He would have replied, "Who made you a judge; to their own master they stand or fall." Every man is responsible for bin own conduct and belief to God. If I please to work with men who are heretical on some points of theology, but who are right in the point in which I work with them (Unitarian temperance reformers, e.g.), I am not responsible for their wrong beliefs, but only for that part which I take. Paul was grieved at the amount of error that was in these men, but the small amount of truth he saw pleased him more.

III. THIS CHRISTIAN TOLERATION FOUNDED IN FAITH AND LOVE, LEADS TO THE REAL AND ONLY REAL UNION POSSIBLE TO THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH. External formulas are not unimportant, but there never will be Christian union in this world until men feel that the invisible, spiritual elements of truth, the interior experience of soul, are transcendently more important than the idea forms, or the government forms, or the worship forms of the Church. Humanity is our common bond outside; why should not Christianity be within? "Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind.

(H. W. Beecher.)

I. IT GIVES IMPULSE TO ALL TRUE MOTIVE POWER. From this sprung their "goodwill."

II. IT IS KEEN IN PERCEIVING, EVEN IN CHAINS, THE WILL OF GOD. "Knowing that I am set."

III. IT IS QUICK IN COOPERATING TO ACCOMPLISH THE WILL OF GOD WHEN KNOWN.

IV. IT BINDS THE HEART IN SYMPATHY TO ALL WHO SUFFER IN THE DEFENCE OF THE GOSPEL.

V. IT IS THE MIGHTIEST FORCE THAT MEN CAN WIELD FOR THE GOSPEL'S TRIUMPH.

(G. G. Ballard.)

I. Let us inquire WHAT THE APOSTLE INTENDED BY THE PREACHING OF CHRIST.

1. The exhibition of Jesus as the Messiah sent to save a guilty world."(1) Such a messenger had been set forth by prophecy and types from the beginning.(2) He was exhibited as truly human, sinless, Divine.

2. The publication of His great work, and ultimate design in visiting this world.

(1)To atone for sin.

(2)To confer eternal life.

3. The assertion of His claims on all mankind.

(1)To their love.

(2)To their obedience.

II. GLORIOUS AS THIS THEME IS, YET MANY PREACH IT FROM CORRUPT MOTIVES.

1. Some for gain — money, position, influence.

2. Some for victory in a controversial battle.

3. Yet if Christ is really preached, whatever may be the condemnation of the preacher, Christ's end will he secured.

III. THE REASONS WHY THE PREACHING OF CHRIST, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, IS A JUST OCCASION FOR HOLY JOY.

1. By this means the enemies of Christ are made to bear unequivocal testimony to His dignity and glory, and to promote the interests of truth without intending it: as the heathen writers quoted by Paul, and the devils' confession of Christ.

2. As the world can only be renovated by the preaching of Christ, so even His enemies who preach Him contribute to this event. Think of the heathen world; the acceptance of Christ in any sense and from any hands cannot but better it.

3. We may be assured that God will certainly overrule the preaching of Christ, even by wicked men, to accomplish His purpose of mercy. In much inferior matters God controls the movements of bad men for His own glory. He did so in the case of Judas. Is it not then correct to argue that if God sub ordinates the malignity, ambition, and haughtiness of men to the accomplishment of His providential purposes, He will also overrule them to serve His designs of mercy? Witness the Reformation under Henry VIII.Application:

1. Our cause for rejoicing is exceedingly great. Notwithstanding there are many parts where the gospel is imperfectly preached, yet there are thousands of holy men who preach Christ from the purest motives.

2. Let us manifest our gratitude to Him who is preached by a more lively zeal in His cause.

3. Let us who love Christ draw into closer union with one another. If we allow bickering and strife while Christ's cause may prosper we shall be ruined.

4. Let the despondent be encouraged — anyhow Christ is preached. The gospel is advancing in spite of our fears.

(Isaac Mann, M. A.)

God grant that we may contend with other Churches as the vine with the olive — which of us shall bear the best fruit; but not as the briar with the thistle, which of us will be the most unprofitable.

(Lord Bacon.)

Paul was imprisoned for preaching the gospel, and was persecuted by them who but for him would not have had a gospel to preach.

1. The apostle had, by nature, a temper that could not bear very much being abused. He was naturally sensitive and aggressive. In prison and helpless no doubt there were slight heavings of the old volcano at the conduct of his opponents. Moreover his conscience was an inspired one, and he must have felt, "Who is a judge of orthodoxy if I am not?" Did he then rouse the alarm and denounce these preachers of envy and strife? No, he rejoiced where few could have rejoiced, viz., in prison, and at what few could have rejoiced, viz., that his enemies were doing good.

2. Paul might have felt that his life was thrown away, that God had need of him. Many feel that everything must be done, and that there is none to do it hut themselves. Paul had a right to feel so if any man had. But the thought never seems to have occurred to him. No doubt he felt the cowardliness and the cruelty of these men, but the feeling was swallowed up in the reflection that they were doing his work when he could not do it himself.

3. Paul held that so precious is this truth of Jesus that no man can present even a particle of it that is not worth presenting. You cannot preach Christ so that it is not worth while to have preached Him thus. It is better that He should be preached by bad men for bad purposes than not preached at all.

4. It would have been enough in Paul to have said less than he did, such as "I trust all will be for the best. I hope it will do some good, but I fear it will do much harm. Of course I cannot associate with them." On the contrary he exults over the certain good of the issue. The hounds of love are better than the hounds of theology to hunt heretics with. How painful not to know the difference between conscience and combativeness.

5. Consider in a few deductions the temptations to which men who are working for religious ends are liable.

I. THE DANGER OF SUBSTITUTING ACTIVITY FOR THE LOVING GRACES. The bee that goes buzzing about the flowers in the spring is very useful; but, after all, I think the flowers, that never stir or buzz, are full as interesting and far more important. The buzzing bee gets a good deal of honey, but he would not get a particle if it were not for the silent flowers which contain it all. There is a great peril of an external rattling activity leaving the heart cold, mechanical, and even malevolent.

II. THE DANGER OF ARROGANCE.

1. There are a great many people who say that all Churches must be constituted, work, and believe as their own.

2. Many of us have got beyond that, but how many of us can rejoice in the Church whose services has swallowed up ours. But all that Paul wanted was that work should be done, whoever did it; and even rejoiced that others would have the credit for the work he did. Conclusion: From the beginning until today the power of preaching has been and henceforth mill be, not in ideas but in disposition.

(H. W. Beecher.)

I. It may be that THE ENEMIES OF THE APOSTLE HOPED THAT THEIR PREACHING WOULD IRRITATE NERO and his officers against Christianity, and that, offended at this new increase which this doctrine had received, they would quickly discharge their anger upon a prisoner, who was the principal support of this growing religion, either by putting him to death suddenly or by condemning him to some more grievous trouble than his present prison.

II. It may be that envy had inspired them with the thought, that BY LABOURING IN PREACHING THE GOSPEL THEY SHOULD OBTAIN A PART OF THE APOSTLE'S GLORY, and that by making good use of the time of his imprisonment, to establish themselves in the minds of the disciples, they should by degrees take away the credit and authority which he possessed; and judging of him by themselves, they imagined that it would be an immense increase to his affliction to see them thus enriched and decorated with his spoils. Such or such like were the thoughts of these wretched men. Judge by this what is the nature of vice, and how horrible its impudence in daring thus to profane the most sacred things, and to abuse them so vilely for, its own ungodly purpose. Thus Satan sometimes clothes himself as an angel of light to further the works of darkness. From which you see that it is not enough that Our actions be good and praiseworthy, if our intentions are not pure and upright. It is to profane the good to do it with a bad end in view.

2. See how the thoughts of vice are not only impudent, but even foolish and vain. These deceivers, judging of St. Paul by themselves, believed that their preaching would vex him. Poor creatures! how little you knew of this high-minded man, to imagine that so small a thing could trouble him!

(J. Daille.)

I once asked a distinguished artist what place he gave to labour in art. "Labour," he said, in effect, "is the beginning, the middle, and the end of art." Turning then to another — "And you," I inquired, "what do you consider the great force in art:" "Love," he replied. In their two answers I found but one truth.

(Boree.)

How Paul would have rejoiced had he been living now. The ministry at Rome must have been on a comparatively insignificant scale. But for every man who preached the gospel then thousands are preaching it now. Why should there have been such rejoicing in connection with the preaching of Christ crucified.

I. Because thereby THE RENOVATION OF FALLEN MAN IS INTELLIGENTLY PROPOSED.

1. High time, by common consent, something was done in that direction, and many are the projects suggested for it.

(1)Give the people a sound secular education.

(2)Give them remunerative employment.

(3)Confer upon them honourable enfranchisement.

(4)Take care to raise them into better and more civilized habits by better dwellings, food, etc.

(5)Educate their tastes, open museums and art galleries.

2. Can you look at these laudable secondary considerations without marking their fatal defect? They deal with man externally and say not a word about his internal renovation. If you leave a man's heart untouched there is that there which will laugh all your culture to scorn. If his heart be right all will be right, but not otherwise.

3. The gospel aims at making the heart right, and succeeds wherever it is accepted.

II. Because thereby THE RENOVATION IS GRACIOUSLY GUARANTEED.

1. With the preaching of Christ God has formally connected the exertion of His power. "With God all things are possible." The preacher is a fellow worker with God.

2. With this preaching God has been pleased to associate the accomplishment of His purposes.

3. He has identified with preaching the manifestation of His sympathies.

(W. Brock, D. D.)

Goodwill
I. IT IS GOD-LIKE.

1. The spirit characteristic of all God's will towards men.

2. The spirit manifested by His Son.

3. The spirit of the gospel message.

II. IT IS YIELDED TO AN HONOURED BROTHER.

1. To him as a man — his character, aims, and life.

2. To his labours in the cause of Christ.

3. To his future success.

(G. G. Ballard.)

I. IS NECESSARY. It has many powerful, malignant enemies.

II. IS IMPERATIVE upon its professors, whether ministers or people.

III. MUST BE MAINTAINED IN LOVE to the truth, its advocates, and even its opponents.

(J. Lyth, D. D.)

I.THE CAUSE TO BE DEFENDED.

II.THE OPPOSITION TO WHICH IT IS EXPOSED.

III.THE MEANS OF ITS DEFENCE.

IV.THE PERSONS WHO OUGHT TO DEFEND IT.

(J. Lyth, D. D.)

In the Corinthian Church there was a party that said, "I am of Cephas" — followers of the apostle of the circumcision, and hostile to those who named themselves from Paul. It is very probable that this Petrine party held high views about the law; but there is no hint in the Epistle to the Corinthians that they either held or taught such mischievous errors as were propagated in Galatia. Minor matters of ceremonial seem rather to have occupied them (1 Corinthians 8:10). But there is no question that the apostle's authority was impugned in Corinth, and in all likelihood by the Petrine party, because he had not been personally called by Jesus as Simon had been; and by the same party his right to pecuniary support from the Churches seems to have been denied or disputed. While therefore there was comparative purity in the section that took Peter for its head and watchword; there was also keen and resolute opposition to the person and prerogative of the Apostle to the Gentiles. To meet all the requirements of the case before us we have only to suppose that such a party was formed at Rome, and Romans 14. seems to indicate their existence. If there was a company of believing Jews, who held the essential doctrines of the gospel, but was combative on points of inferior value, and in connection with the social institutions of their people, and who at the same time were bitter and unscrupulous antagonists of the apostle, from such an impression of his opinions as is indicated by James in Acts 21:20-21, then such a party might preach Christ, and yet cherish towards St. Paul all those feelings of envy and ill will he ascribes to them. touches the truth when he says they were jealous of the apostle. Calvin writes feelingly, "Paul says nothing here which I myself have not experienced. For there are men living now who have preached the gospel with no other design than to gratify the rage of the wicked by persecuting pious pastors."

(Professor Eadie.)

Paul's example is a rebuke to the excessive ecclesiastical spirit. He saw something good in the worst men who preached. Modern precisionists see the worst in the best men. Paul looked on the good side. Modern orthodoxy is disposed always to look on the bad side. If a vase was cracked, Paul turned it round and looked upon the side where it was not cracked. If a vase is cracked, we are disposed to turn it round and look on the side where the crack comes. Paul would certainly rather have men preach Christ that loved Christ; but rather than that Christ should not be preached he was willing that those who did not love Him should preach.

(H. W. Beecher.)

The rising sun in the morning brings ten thousand noxious insects to life, brings miasma from the morass, and sets disease flying through the land; nevertheless, in spite of malaria, and in spite of all venemous insects that then begin to move, and in spite of all mischiefs which waking men begin to perform, it is infinitely better that the sun should rise, and that these evils should take place, than that it should be everlastingly dark. It was better to have Christ preached by bad men than not at all. It was better to have the gospel imperfectly delivered than not to have it made known in any way, or only to a limited extent. The truth preached with manifold and manifest error is a thousand times better than none at all. While the full and symmetrical truth as it is in Jesus will do far more good, and good of a far higher type, than any fragmentary views, yet such is the vitality and power of Christian truth, that its very fragments are potent for good. One may stand before an ample glass, long and broad, which reflects the whole figure, and the whole room, giving every part in proportion and in relation. Break that mirror into a thousand fragments, and each one of these pieces will give back to you your face; and though the amplitude of view and the relations of objects are gone, yet the smallest fragment, in its nature and uses, is a mirror still, and you can see your face withal. A full Christ reflects men, time, and immortality; but let error shatter the celestial glass, and its fragments, reduced in value, do in part some of that work which the whole did; and they are precious.

(H. W. Beecher.)

"You (Scotch commissioners and Presbyterian clergy after Dunbar) say that you have just cause to regret that men of civil employments should usurp the calling of the ministry to the scandal of the Reformed Kirks. Are you troubled that Christ is preached? Is preaching so exclusively your function? I thought the covenant and those professors of it could have been willing that any should speak good of the name of Christ; if not it is no covenant of God's approving."

(Oliver Cromwell.)

A railway man asked for a genuine Catholic Bible, as he was not allowed to read a heretical version like Luther's. "Here is the book you want," said the colporteur, handing him a Van Ess copy. "Yes; that is the book," said the man, after looking at it well. That happened a few weeks ago, and now Jesus is his All, and he finds the same grand truths about Him, whether he takes Luther's translation or Van Ess's. God's Word shall not return void to Him.

(Anstera.)

The surest way of turning a person from one pleasure is to give him a greater pleasure on the opposite side. A weeping willow planted by a pond in a pleasure garden turns all to one side in its growth, and that the side on which the water lies. No dealing with its roots or with its branches will avail to change its attitude; but place a larger expanse of water on the opposite side, and the tree will turn spontaneously and hang the other way. So must man's heart be won.

(William Arnot.)

This is the weapon that has won victories over hearts of every kind, in every quarter of the globe. Greenlanders, Africans, South Sea Islanders, Hindoos, and Chinese, have all alike felt its power. Just as that huge iron tube, which crosses the Menai Straits, is more affected and bent by half an hour's sunshine than by all the dead weight that can be placed in it, so in like manner the hearts of savages have melted before the Cross when every other argument seemed to move them no more than if they had been stones.

(Bp. Ryle.)

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