1 Kings 15:14
But the high places were not removed: nevertheless Asa's heart was perfect with the LORD all his days.
Jump to: BarnesBensonBICambridgeClarkeDarbyEllicottExpositor'sExp DctGaebeleinGSBGillGrayHaydockHastingsHomileticsJFBKDKJTLangeMacLarenMHCMHCWParkerPoolePulpitSermonSCOTTBWESTSK
EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(14) But the high places were not removed.—The record of the Chronicles—contrasting 2Chronicles 14:5 with 1Kings 15:17—indicates with tolerable plainness an attempt at this reform on Asa’s part, which was not carried out successfully. In spite of all experience of the corruptions inevitably resulting from them, the craving for local and visible sanctuaries, natural at all times, and especially in generations which had been degraded by gross idolatry, proved too strong for even earnest reformers. The historian, writing under the light of later experience, dwells on this imperfection of religious reform again and again.

1 Kings 15:14. The high places were not removed — 2 Chronicles 14:3. He took away the altars of the strange gods, and the high places where they were worshipped: but as for those high places where the true God was worshipped, he did not take them away; partly, because he thought there was no great evil in them, which had been used by David and Solomon, and other good men; partly because he thought the removal of them might do more hurt than their continuance, by occasioning the total neglect of God’s worship by many of the people, who either could not, or through want of faith and zeal would not, go up to Jerusalem to worship; now especially, when the Israelites, formerly their friends, were become their enemies, and watched all opportunities to invade or molest them. Asa’s heart was perfect — That is, he sincerely and constantly adhered to the worship of God. Though he could not hinder the people from using the high places, yet he entirely devoted himself to the worship of God in the manner and place prescribed by him.15:9-24 Asa did what was right in the eyes of the Lord. That is right indeed which is so in God's eyes. Asa's times were times of reformation. He removed that which was evil; there reformation begins, and a great deal he found to do. When Asa found idolatry in the court, he rooted it out thence. Reformation must begin at home. Asa honours and respects his mother; he loves her well, but he loves God better. Those that have power are happy when thus they have hearts to use it well. We must not only cease to do evil, but learn to do well; not only cast away the idols of our iniquity, but dedicate ourselves and our all to God's honour and glory. Asa was cordially devoted to the service of God, his sins not arising from presumption. But his league with Benhadad arose from unbelief. Even true believers find it hard, in times of urgent danger, to trust in the Lord with all their heart. Unbelief makes way for carnal policy, and thus for one sin after another. Unbelief has often led Christians to call in the help of the Lord's enemies in their contests with their brethren; and some who once shone brightly, have thus been covered with a dark cloud towards the end of their days.2 Chronicles 14:3 would seem at first sight to imply that he entirely put down the worship. But idolatry, if at one time put down, crept back afterward; or while Asa endeavored to sweep it wholly away, his subjects would not be controlled, but found a means of maintaining it in some places - not perhaps in the cities (see 2 Chronicles 14:5), but in remote country districts, where the royal authority was weaker, and secrecy more practicable. 13. also Maachah his mother, even her he removed from being queen—The sultana, or queen dowager, was not necessarily the king's natural mother (see 1Ki 2:19), nor was Maachah. Her title, and the privileges connected with that honor and dignity which gave her precedency among the ladies of the royal family, and great influence in the kingdom, were taken away. She was degraded for her idolatry.

because she had made an idol in a grove—A very obscene figure, and the grove was devoted to the grossest licentiousness. His plans of religious reformation, however, were not completely carried through, "the high places were not removed" (see 1Ki 3:2). The suppression of this private worship on natural or artificial hills, though a forbidden service after the temple had been declared the exclusive place of worship, the most pious king's laws were not able to accomplish.

The high places were not removed.

Object. He did take these away, 2 Chronicles 14:3.

Answ. He took away those which were devoted to the worship of idols, as is there said, he took away the altars of the strange gods, and the highplaces, to wit, where they were worshipped: but as for those high places where the true God was worshipped, he did not take them away; partly, because he thought there was no great evil in them, because they had been used by David and Solomon, and other good and wise men; and because the true God was there worshipped, and that in the manner, though not in the place, which God had appointed; and partly, because he thought the removal of them might do much more hurt than their continuance, to wit, by occasioning the total neglect of God’s worship by many of the people, who either could not, or through want of competent faith and zeal would not, go up to Jerusalem to worship, now especially, when the Israelites, their near neighbours, formerly their friends, were become their enemies, and watched all opportunities to invade or molest them, which they concluded they would do when all their males were gone up to Jerusalem; and partly, because the people were so obstinately bent towards them, that it was, or at least seemed to him, impossible to remove them without great offence, or such commotions as were highly dangerous to that church and state.

Asa’s heart was perfect with the Lord, i.e. he did sincerely and constantly adhere to the worship and service of God. Though he could not hinder the people from using the high places, yet he did entirely devote himself to the worship of God in the manner and place prescribed by God. But the high places were not removed,.... That is, such as had been used for the worship of God, before the temple was built, which yet now should have been removed, since sacrifice was now only to be offered there; but he might think they were still lawful, or the people had such an opinion of them, that it was difficult and dangerous to attempt to remove them; otherwise high places for idolatry were removed by him, 2 Chronicles 14:3,

nevertheless, Asa's heart was perfect all his days; he was sincere in the worship of God, and did everything to the best of his knowledge and capacity for restoring true religion, and destroying idolatry.

But the high places were not removed: nevertheless Asa's heart was {e} perfect with the LORD all his days.

(e) Though he permitted them to worship God in other places than he had appointed it came from ignorance, and not from malice.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
14. But the high places were not removed] R.V. taken away. The change is made that this passage may be rendered in the same way as 2 Chronicles 15:17, with which it is identical. In Judah (we are told 2 Chronicles 14:5) Asa did take away the high places, but in Israel (2 Chronicles 15:17) they were not taken away. The mention of this as something which Asa might have been expected to effect shews that the conquests of his father and himself had given them much control (or influence) over the affairs of the northern kingdom. As the high places had been long tolerated, and the worship offered there had been accepted we can see how much more difficult it would be to put down this form of worship than any of the others. Hence, in spite of the continuance of the high places, Asa’s heart is said to have been ‘perfect with the Lord.’ The worship on the high places was long kept up. They are mentioned again 1 Kings 22:44; 2 Kings 12:3; 2 Kings 14:4; 2 Kings 15:4; 2 Kings 15:35.Verse 14. - But the high places [evidently such as are referred to in ch. 3, i.e., unauthorized shrines of Jehovah; cf. 2 Kings 14:4] were not taken away [lit., departed not. Yet we read in 2 Chronicles 45:3, that Asa "took away the high places (cf. ver. 5). But it is clear, even from 2 Chronicles 15:17, that all of them were not re moved, and the discrepancy arises from the well-known Eastern idiom of putting the whole for the part, of which we have in stances in Genesis 7:19; Exodus 9:25, etc. Cf. ver. 32; 2 Kings 9:35, and see below. Asa probably aimed at removing all, and he may have removed all out of the cities (2 Chronicles 14:5), but some remained in the country districts or in remote places. Or he may have swept them away for a short time, and they may have been stealthily and gradually reintroduced. It may be interesting to remark here that down to the present day the cultus of the high places exists - under a modified form, it is true - in Palestine. Every traveller will remember the Mukama which crown almost every hill. The religion of the Fellahin, though nominally Mohammedan, is really, like that of China, a worship of the dead. "In almost every village of the country a small building, surmounted by a whitewashed dome, is observable, being the sacred chapel of the place; it is variously called Kubbeh, "dome," Mazor, "shrine," or Mukam, "station," the latter being a Hebrew word, used in the Bible for the places of the Canaanites (Deuteronomy 2:2)... Just as in the time of Moses, so now the position chosen for the Mukam is generally conspicuous This Mukam represents the real religion of the peasant" (Conder, pp. 304 sqq.)]: nevertheless Asa's heart was perfect with the Lord all his days. [We have here a notable instance of the Oriental exaggeration just referred to. For the very same expression is used by the chronicler (2 Chronicles 15:17), who in the next chapter (2 Chronic;es 16:7-12) tells us of Asa's unfaithfulness in his old age.] "And there was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam all his life;" i.e., the state of hostility which had already existed between Rehoboam and Jeroboam continued "all the days of his life," or so long as Abijam lived and reigned. If we take חיּיו כּל־ימי in this manner (not כּל־ימיהם, 1 Kings 15:16), the statement loses the strangeness which it has at first sight, and harmonizes very well with that in 1 Kings 15:7, that there was also war between Abijam and Jeroboam. Under Abijam it assumed the form of a serious war, in which Jeroboam sustained a great defeat (see 2 Chronicles 13:3-20). - The other notices concerning Abijam in 1 Kings 15:7, 1 Kings 15:8 are the same as in the case of Rehoboam in 1 Kings 14:29, 1 Kings 14:31.
Links
1 Kings 15:14 Interlinear
1 Kings 15:14 Parallel Texts


1 Kings 15:14 NIV
1 Kings 15:14 NLT
1 Kings 15:14 ESV
1 Kings 15:14 NASB
1 Kings 15:14 KJV

1 Kings 15:14 Bible Apps
1 Kings 15:14 Parallel
1 Kings 15:14 Biblia Paralela
1 Kings 15:14 Chinese Bible
1 Kings 15:14 French Bible
1 Kings 15:14 German Bible

Bible Hub






1 Kings 15:13
Top of Page
Top of Page