Genesis 46:1
So Israel set out with all that he had, and when he came to Beersheba, he offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac.
Sermons
Emigrate, But not Without GodW. M. Taylor, D. D.Genesis 46:1-7
God Speaking in the Visions of the NightR.A. Redford Genesis 46:1-7
Israel's Journey into EgyptH. T. Holmes.Genesis 46:1-7
The Family MigrationW. S. Smith, B. D.Genesis 46:1-7
The Migration of Jacob's House to EgyptT. H. Leale.Genesis 46:1-7
The Three MeetingsW. Roberts Genesis 46:1-4; 46:28-30; 47:7-10
While there were providential intimations which were clear enough, still the direct revelation of God was necessary for Jacob's assurance. At Beersheba, the consecrated spot, Jacob offers sacrifices in the covenant spirit, and receives in return the message of the covenant God: "I will make of thee a great nation." "I will also surely bring thee up again," i.e. in thy descendants. The vision is not a mere personal matter for Jacob's consolation, it is another in the series of Divine revelations which are connected with the development of the covenant. - R.







And Israel took his Journey with all that he had.
I. A JOURNEY WHICH THE PATRIARCH HAD NEVER EXPECTED TO TAKE, AND WHICH WAS FRAUGHT WITH CONSEQUENCES WHICH HE HAD NEVER HOPED TO SEE.

II. THE RELIGIOUS SPIRIT IN WHICH THE PATRIARCH ENTERED UPON THIS JOURNEY.

III. WHEN THE PATRIARCH SOUGHT THE LORD AT BEER-SHEBA, HE APPEARED TO HIM AND BLESSED HIM.

1. The Lord appeared to His servant, when he had offered up his sacrifices to Him.

2. The very gracious manner in which the Lord addressed His servant in this vision.

3. The Lord gave to His servant words of wise and kindly counsel, just what was suitable in the circumstances in which he was placed.

IV. THE FULFILMENT OF THE PROMISE WHICH THE LORD GAVE TO ISRAEL IN THIS VISION CONCERNING HIS JOURNEY INTO EGYPT.

(H. T. Holmes.)

I. IT WAS THE SECOND STAGE IN THE COVENANT HISTORY.

II. IT WAS THE FULFILMENT OF THE DIVINE PLAN.

III. IT WAS ENTERED UPON WITH DUE SOLEMNITY.

IV. IT HAD THE APPROVAL OF GOD. God has always appeared in some special act or word in every great crisis of His people's history. As to Jacob —

1. He found God as he had sought Him. "I am God, the God of thy father." The Name used reveals the Omnipotent God, the Mighty One who is able to fulfil His covenant engagements, and who could bring Jacob safely through all his difficulties, present and future. Israel had found his God faithful in all His gracious dealings, and he believed that he should still see the same loving kindness and truth for the time to come.

2. The will of God is clearly made known. "Fear not to go down to Egypt." He was distinctly assured that it was God's will that he should go there.

3. The protection of God is promised. "Fear not — I will go down with thee into Egypt."

4. The purpose of God is declared. "I will there make of thee a great nation." "I will surely bring thee up again."

(T. H. Leale.)

I. THE DEPARTURE FROM CANAAN.

1. Jacob offers sacrifice.

2. God renews the promise.

II. THE REUNION IN EGYPT.

III. THE ABODE IN GOSHEN. Why was Joseph so anxious to establish his father's family in Goshen? Joseph felt that there were many dangers incident to the sojourn of the "Hebrews," his kinsfolk, in Egypt.

1. The danger of quarrels. The Egyptians might become jealous of the foreigners in their land. The Hebrews might, perhaps, presume too much on the favour shown by Pharaoh to Joseph and Jacob.

2. The danger from heathenism. There was much idolatry and animal worship in Egypt. The " magicians" and their arts might corrupt the minds of the children of Israel, and prevent them from the worship of the one true God.

3. The danger of his kin kinsmen forgetting Canaan as the land where their lot as a nation was fixed by God. He did not want them to be Egyptianized. They must, as far as possible, be kept a "separate" people.

(W. S. Smith, B. D.)

History repeats itself, and this old story fits into multitudinous modern instances. But not always is sufficient heed given to the sacrificing at Beer-sheba; and the point I make now is, that in all such changes we should seek, above all things else, the companionship of God. Nothing will harm us anywhere if God is with us, and we cannot have the highest good if we go even into the fairest Goshen on the continent without Him. Horace Greely, long ago, set the fashion of saying, "Go West, young man, go West"; and there is wisdom in the advice, provided it be conjoined with the admonition, "But don't go without your God." Perhaps some here are meditating on the propriety of their pushing away into the places where the labour market is not overstocked, and the opportunities are far better than they are in a comparatively crowded city such as this. Nor do we say a word against the project. Go, by all means, if you are not afraid to work; but remember the sacrifice at Beer-sheba, and don't go without your God. Too many have done that, and have gone to ruin. But take Him with you, and He will be "your shield and your exceeding great reward."

(W. M. Taylor, D. D.)

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