Luke 6:21
Blessed are ye that hunger now: for ye shall be filled. Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(21) Blessed are ye that hunger now.—In the second beatitude, as in the first, we note the absence of the words that seem to give the blessing on those that “hunger and thirst after righteousness” its specially spiritual character. The law implied is obviously the same as before. Fulness of bread, a life abounding in comforts and luxuries, like that of the Rich Man in the parable of Luke 16:19, tends to dull the edge of appetite for higher things. Those who know what the hunger of the body is, can understand better, and are more likely to feel, the hunger of the soul.

Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh.—The clause is remarkable as being (with its counterpart in Luke 6:25) the only instance in the New Testament of the use of “laughter” as the symbol of spiritual joy. In James 4:9 it comes in as representing worldly gladness; but the Greek word was too much associated with the lower forms of mirth to find ready acceptance. It is probable that the Aramaic word which our Lord used, like the mirth or laughter which entered into the name of Isaac (Genesis 21:6), had a somewhat higher meaning. Hebrew laughter was a somewhat graver thing than that of Greek or Roman. It had had no comedy to degrade it.

6:20-26 Here begins a discourse of Christ, most of which is also found in Mt 5; 7. But some think that this was preached at another time and place. All believers that take the precepts of the gospel to themselves, and live by them, may take the promises of the gospel to themselves, and live upon them. Woes are denounced against prosperous sinners as miserable people, though the world envies them. Those are blessed indeed whom Christ blesses, but those must be dreadfully miserable who fall under his woe and curse! What a vast advantage will the saint have over the sinner in the other world! and what a wide difference will there be in their rewards, how much soever the sinner may prosper, and the saint be afflicted here!That hunger now - Matthew has it, "that hunger and thirst after righteousness." Matthew has expressed more fully what Luke has briefly, but there is no contradiction.21. laugh—How charming is the liveliness of this word, to express what in Matthew is called being "comforted!" See Poole on "Luke 6:20"

Blessed are ye that hunger now,.... Not only suffer hunger and thirst in a literal sense, in this present life, but who have hunger and thirst in a spiritual sense, after righteousness and eternal life, as in Matthew 5:6 where it is also said as here:

for ye shall be filled: with righteousness and life; See Gill on Matthew 5:6.

blessed are ye that weep now; under afflictions and pressures of life, and mourn for sin, their own, and others:

for ye shall laugh; be filled with spiritual joy and pleasure, and be comforted with the consolations of the Spirit; See Gill on Matthew 5:4.

Blessed are ye that hunger now: for ye shall be filled. Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh.
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
21. Blessed are ye that hunger now] Comp. Luke 1:53; Psalm 107:9. St Matthew here also brings out more clearly that it is the beatitude of spiritual hunger “after righteousness.”

ye shall laugh] See 2 Corinthians 6:10; Revelation 21:4.

Luke 6:21. Νῦν, now) This particle is added to those particulars which apply to both worlds, according to the different characters of the men referred to.[61]

[61] i.e. Those who do not hunger or weep now in this world, shall hunger and weep in the world to come, and vice versa.—ED.

Verse 21. - Blessed are ye that hunger now: for ye shall be filled. A similar question probably to the one suggested above, brought out the addition reported in St. Matthew's account - " after righteousness." Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh. There is a mourning which, as Augustine says, has no blessing from heaven attached to it, at best only a sorrow of this world and for the things of this world. What Jesus speaks of is a nobler grief', a weeping for our sins and the sins of others, for our weary exile here. This is "the only instance," writes Dean Plumptre, "in the New Testament of the use of 'laughter' as the symbol of spiritual joy .... The Greek word was too much associated with the lower forms of mirth .... It is probable that the Aramaic word which our Lord doubtless used here had a somewhat higher meaning. Hebrew laughter was a somewhat graver thing than that of Greek or Roman. Comedy was unknown among the Hebrew people." It is observable that we read of our Lord weeping. His joy is mentioned, and his sorrow. He sympathized with all classes and orders, talked with them, even ate and drank with them; but we never read that he laughed. There was a tradition in the early Church that Lazarus, after he rose from the dead, was never seen again to smile. Luke 6:21Now

Peculiar to Luke.

Shall be filled

See on Matthew 5:6.

Weep (κλαίοντες)

Strictly, to weep audibly. See on πενθοῦντες, mourn, Matthew 5:4.

Laugh (γελάσετε)

Matthew, shall be comforted.

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