Luke 10:5
And into whatever house you enter, first say, Peace be to this house.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(5-7) Peace be to this house.—See Notes on Matthew 10:12-13. St. Luke gives, what is only implied in St. Matthew, the very form of the salutation.

Luke 10:5-6. Into whatsoever house ye enter, &c. — They are supposed to enter into private houses; for, not being admitted into the synagogues, they were forced to preach where they could have liberty. First say, Peace be to this house — To all under this roof, to this family, and all that belong to it. As if he had said, In all the stages of your journey, carry along with you those benevolent affections which are so well suited to the design of your mission. Peace be to you, was the common form of salutation among the Jews. They must not use it in formality, and according to custom, to those they meet on the way; but they must use it with solemnity and seriousness to those into whose houses they entered. And if the son of peace — Or any truly pious man who is worthy of such a blessing; be there — In the house; your peace shall rest upon it — Your prayer for the peace and prosperity of the family shall be heard and answered. Or, the blessing which you gave at your entrance, shall, by my power, be made effectual to that house, and shall remain with it. If not, it shall turn, &c. — You will meet with some that are not disposed to hear or regard your message; even whole houses that have not one son of peace in them. Now it is certain your peace shall not come upon them; they shall have no part nor lot in the matter: the blessing that shall rest upon the sons of peace shall never come upon the sons of Belial; nor can any expect the privileges of the covenant of grace that will not come under the bonds of it; but it shall turn to you again — You shall have the comfort of having discharged your trust, and done your duty to God.10:1-16 Christ sent the seventy disciples, two and two, that they might strengthen and encourage one another. The ministry of the gospel calls men to receive Christ as a Prince and a Saviour; and he will surely come in the power of his Spirit to all places whither he sends his faithful servants. But the doom of those who receive the grace of God in vain, will be very fearful Those who despise the faithful ministers of Christ, who think meanly of them, and look scornfully upon them, will be reckoned as despisers of God and Christ.See the notes at Matthew 10:13. 3-12. (See on [1625]Mt 10:7-16).Ver. 5-7. See Poole on "Matthew 10:11", and See Poole on "Mark 6:10". The instructions, as to the substance of them, are the same here as there, though a little differing in the terms. And into whatsoever house ye enter,.... When ye come into any city, town, or village,

first say, peace be to this house: salute the inhabitants in the usual form, saying, peace be to you; wishing them all happiness and prosperity, temporal, spiritual, and eternal. This shows our Lord did not disapprove of civil salutations.

And into whatsoever house ye enter, first say, Peace be to this house.
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
Luke 10:5-6. See on Matthew 10:12 f.

The construction εἰς ἣν κ.τ.λ. is the same as in Luke 10:8. Comp. on Matthew 10:14.

υἱὸς εἰρήνης] a son of salvation, i.e. one who is fit to receive salvation, not different in substance from the ἄξιος in Matthew. Its opposite is υἱὸς ὀργῆς (Ephesians 2:3), τῆς ἀπωλείας (John 17:12), τῆς ἀπειθείας (Ephesians 5:6), γεέννης (Matthew 23:15). Comp. in general on Matthew 8:12.Luke 10:5. πρῶτον λέγετε: the first word to be spoken, peace, speech on the things of the kingdom to be prepared for by courteous, kindly salutations. A sympathetic heart is the best guide in pastoral visitation. The first word should not be: how is it with your soul?5. Peace be to this house] Adopted in our service for the Visitation of the Sick. God’s messengers should begin first with prayers for peace, not with objurgations. Bengel.Luke 10:5. Πρῶτον, first) The messenger of God ought to make his beginning with praying for the salvation of men, before that he proceeds to reprove them.Verse 5. - Peace be to this house. The original of the words used in the Church of England Office for the Visitation of the Sick. Peace to this house

The usual oriental salutation. See Judges 19:20.

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