Genesis 25:32
Parallel Verses
New International Version
"Look, I am about to die," Esau said. "What good is the birthright to me?"

King James Bible
And Esau said, Behold, I am at the point to die: and what profit shall this birthright do to me?

Darby Bible Translation
And Esau said, Behold, I am going to die, and of what use can the birthright be to me?

World English Bible
Esau said, "Behold, I am about to die. What good is the birthright to me?"

Young's Literal Translation
And Esau saith, 'Lo, I am going to die, and what is this to me -- birthright?'

Genesis 25:32 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

Sell me this day thy birthright - What the בחרה bechorah or birthright was, has greatly divided both ancient and modern commentators. It is generally supposed that the following rights were attached to the primogeniture:

1. Authority and superiority over the rest of the family.

2. A double portion of the paternal inheritance.

3. The peculiar benediction of the father.

4. The priesthood, previous to its establishment in the family of Aaron.

Calmet controverts most of these rights, and with apparent reason, and seems to think that the double portion of the paternal inheritance was the only incontestable right which the first-born possessed; the others were such as were rather conceded to the first-born, than fixed by any law in the family. However this may be, it appears,

1. That the first-born were peculiarly consecrated to God, Exodus 22:29.

2. Were next in honor to their parents, Genesis 49:3.

3. Had a double portion of their father's goods, Deuteronomy 21:17.

4. Succeeded him in the government of the family or kingdom, 2 Chronicles 21:3.

5. Had the sole right of conducting the service of God, both at the tabernacle and temple; and hence the tribe of Levi, which was taken in lieu of the first-born, had the sole right of administration in the service of God, Numbers 8:14-18; and hence we may presume, had originally a right to the priesthood previous to the giving of the law; but however this might have been, afterwards the priesthood is never reckoned among the privileges of the first-born.

That the birthright was a matter of very great importance, there can be no room to doubt; and that it was a transferable property, the transaction here sufficiently proves.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

at the point to die. Heb. going to die. and what.

Job 21:15 What is the Almighty, that we should serve him? and what profit should we have, if we pray to him?

Job 22:17 Which said to God, Depart from us: and what can the Almighty do for them?

Job 34:9 For he has said, It profits a man nothing that he should delight himself with God.

Malachi 3:14 You have said, It is vain to serve God: and what profit is it that we have kept his ordinance...

birthright.

Exodus 22:9 For all manner of trespass, whether it be for ox, for donkey, for sheep, for raiment...

Library
Pottage Versus Birthright
Esau despised his birthright'--GENESIS xxv. 34. Broad lessons unmistakable, but points strange and difficult to throw oneself back to so different a set of ideas. So I. Deal with the narrative. Not to tell it over again, but bring out the following points:-- (a) Birthright.--What? None of them any notion of sacred, spiritual aspect of it. To all, merely material advantages: headship of the clan. All the loftier aspects gone from Isaac, who thought he could give it for venison, from Esau, and from
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions of Holy Scripture

Jesus Heals Multitudes Beside the Sea of Galilee.
^A Matt. XII. 15-21; ^B Mark III. 7-12. ^a 15 And Jesus perceiving it withdrew ^b with his disciples ^a from thence: ^b to the sea [This was the first withdrawal of Jesus for the avowed purpose of self-preservation. After this we find Jesus constantly retiring to avoid the plots of his enemies. The Sea of Galilee, with its boats and its shores touching different jurisdictions, formed a convenient and fairly safe retreat]: ^a and many followed him; ^b and a great multitude from Galilee followed; and
J. W. McGarvey—The Four-Fold Gospel

Genesis
The Old Testament opens very impressively. In measured and dignified language it introduces the story of Israel's origin and settlement upon the land of Canaan (Gen.--Josh.) by the story of creation, i.-ii. 4a, and thus suggests, at the very beginning, the far-reaching purpose and the world-wide significance of the people and religion of Israel. The narrative has not travelled far till it becomes apparent that its dominant interests are to be religious and moral; for, after a pictorial sketch of
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Cross References
Genesis 25:31
Jacob replied, "First sell me your birthright."

Genesis 25:33
But Jacob said, "Swear to me first." So he swore an oath to him, selling his birthright to Jacob.

Genesis 27:36
Esau said, "Isn't he rightly named Jacob? This is the second time he has taken advantage of me: He took my birthright, and now he's taken my blessing!" Then he asked, "Haven't you reserved any blessing for me?"

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