Job 14:19
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
the waters wear away the stones; the torrents wash away the soil of the earth; so you destroy the hope of man.

King James Bible
The waters wear the stones: thou washest away the things which grow out of the dust of the earth; and thou destroyest the hope of man.

American Standard Version
The waters wear the stones; The overflowings thereof wash away the dust of the earth: So thou destroyest the hope of man.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Waters wear away the stones, and with inundation the ground by little and little is washed away: so in like manner thou shalt destroy man.

English Revised Version
The waters wear the stones; the overflowings thereof wash away the dust of the earth: and thou destroyest the hope of man.

Webster's Bible Translation
The waters wear the stones: thou washest away the things which grow out of the dust of the earth; and thou destroyest the hope of man.

Job 14:19 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

13 Oh that Thou wouldst hide me in Shel,

That Thou wouldst conceal me till Thine anger change,

That Thou wouldst appoint me a time and then remember me!

14 If man dieth, shall he live again?

All the days of my warfare would Iwait,

Until my change should come.

15 Thou wouldst call and I would answer,

Thou wouldst have a desire for the work of Thy hands -

16 For now thou numberest my steps,

And dost not restrain thyself over my sins.

The optative יתּן מי introduces a wish that has reference to the future, and is therefore, as at Job 6:8, followed by futt.; comp. on the other hand, Job 23:3, utinam noverim. The language of the wish reminds one of such passages in the Psalms as Psalm 31:21; Psalm 27:5 (comp. Isaiah 26:20): "In the day of trouble He hideth me in His pavilion, and in the secret of His tabernacle doth He conceal me." So Job wishes that Hades, into which the wrath of God now precipitates him for ever, may only be a temporary place of safety for him, until the wrath of God turn away (שׁוּב, comp. the causative, Job 9:13); that God would appoint to him, when there, a חק, i.e., a terminus ad quem (comp. Job 14:5), and when this limit should be reached, again remember him in mercy. This is a wish that Job marks out for himself. The reality is indeed different: "if (ἐὰν) a man dies, will he live again?" The answer which Job's consciousness, ignorant of anything better, alone can give, is: No, there is no life after death. It is, however, none the less a craving of his heart that gives rise to the wish; it is the most favourable thought, - a desirable possibility, - which, if it were but a reality, would comfort him under all present suffering: "all the days of my warfare would I wait until my change came." צבא is the name he gives to the whole of this toilsome and sorrowful interval between the present and the wished-for goal, - the life on earth, which he likens to the service of the soldier or of the hireling (Job 7:1), and which is subject to an inevitable destiny (Job 5:7) of manifold suffering, together with the night of Hades, where this life is continued in its most shadowy and dismal phase. And חליפה does not here signify destruction in the sense of death, as the Jewish expositors, by comparing Isaiah 2:18 and Sol 2:11, explain it; but (with reference to צבאי, comp. Job 10:17) the following after (Arab. chlı̂ft, succession, successor, i.e., of Mohammed), relief, change (syn. תּמוּרה, exchange, barter), here of change of condition, as Psalm 55:20, of change of mind; Aquila, Theod., ἄλλαγμα. Oh that such a change awaited him! What a blessed future would it be if it should come to pass! Then would God call to him in the depth of Shel, and he, imprisoned until the appointed time of release, would answer Him from the deep. After His anger was spent, God would again yearn after the work of His hands (comp. Job 10:3), the natural loving relation between the Creator and His creature would again prevail, and it would become manifest that wrath is only a waning power (Isaiah 54:8), and love His true and essential attribute. Schlottman well observes: "Job must have had a keen perception of the profound relation between the creature and his Maker in the past, to be able to give utterance to such an imaginative expectation respecting the future."

In Job 14:16, Job supports what is cheering in this prospect, with which he wishes he might be allowed to console himself, by the contrast of the present. עתּה כּי is used here as in Job 6:21; כי is not, as elsewhere, where עתה כי introduces the conclusion, confirmatory (indeed now equals then indeed), but assigns a reason (for now). Now God numbers his steps (Job 13:27), watching him as a criminal, and does not restrain himself over his sin. Most modern expositors (Ew., Hlgst, Hahn, Schlottm.) translate: Thou observest not my sins, i.e., whether they are to be so severely punished or not; but this is poor. Raschi: Thou waitest not over my sins, i.e., to punish them; instead of which Ralbag directly: Thou waitest not for my sins equals repentance or punishment; but שׁמר is not supported in the meaning: to wait, by Genesis 37:11. Aben-Ezra: Thou lookest not except on my sins, by supplying רק, according to Ecclesiastes 2:24 (where, however, probably משׁיאכל should be read, and מ after אדם, just as in Job 33:17, has fallen away). The most doubtful is, with Hirzel, to take the sentence as interrogative, in opposition to the parallelism: and dost Thou not keep watch over my sins? It seems to me that the sense intended must be derived from the phrase אף שׁמר, which means to keep anger, and consequently to delay the manifestation of it (Amos 1:11). This phrase is here so applied, that we obtain the sense: Thou keepest not Thy wrath to thyself, but pourest it out entirely. Mercerus is substantially correct: non reservas nec differs peccati mei punitionem.

Job 14:19 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

The waters (Hence the proverb, 'Constant droppings make a hole in a stone.')

washest. Heb. overflowest

Genesis 6:17 And, behold, I, even I, do bring a flood of waters on the earth, to destroy all flesh, wherein is the breath of life...

Genesis 7:21-23 And all flesh died that moved on the earth, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of beast...

destroyest

Job 19:10 He has destroyed me on every side, and I am gone: and my hope has he removed like a tree.

Job 27:8 For what is the hope of the hypocrite, though he has gained, when God takes away his soul?

Psalm 30:6,7 And in my prosperity I said, I shall never be moved...

Ezekiel 37:11 Then he said to me, Son of man, these bones are the whole house of Israel: behold, they say, Our bones are dried, and our hope is lost...

Luke 12:19,20 And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have much goods laid up for many years; take your ease, eat, drink, and be merry...

Cross References
Job 7:6
My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle and come to their end without hope.

Job 14:18
"But the mountain falls and crumbles away, and the rock is removed from its place;

Job 22:16
They were snatched away before their time; their foundation was washed away.

Jump to Previous
Crushed Destroy Destroyed Destroyest Dust Earth End Floods Force Grow Hope Overflowing Overflowings Small Soil Stones Thereof Torrents Wash Washed Washest Water Waters Wear Wears Worn
Jump to Next
Crushed Destroy Destroyed Destroyest Dust Earth End Floods Force Grow Hope Overflowing Overflowings Small Soil Stones Thereof Torrents Wash Washed Washest Water Waters Wear Wears Worn
Links
Job 14:19 NIV
Job 14:19 NLT
Job 14:19 ESV
Job 14:19 NASB
Job 14:19 KJV

Job 14:19 Bible Apps
Job 14:19 Biblia Paralela
Job 14:19 Chinese Bible
Job 14:19 French Bible
Job 14:19 German Bible

Bible Hub

ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
Job 14:18
Top of Page
Top of Page