Hosea 7:15
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
Although I trained and strengthened their arms, yet they devise evil against me.

King James Bible
Though I have bound and strengthened their arms, yet do they imagine mischief against me.

American Standard Version
Though I have taught and strengthened their arms, yet do they devise mischief against me.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And I have chastised them, and strengthened their arms: and they have imagined evil against me.

English Revised Version
Though I have taught and strengthened their arms, yet do they imagine mischief against me.

Webster's Bible Translation
Though I have bound and strengthened their arms, yet do they imagine mischief against me.

Hosea 7:15 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

To bring the subjugated kingdom wholly under his power, he shall carry away its gods along with all the precious treasures into Egypt. The carrying away of the images of the gods was a usual custom with conquerors; cf. Isaiah 46:1., Jeremiah 48:7; Jeremiah 49:3. In the images the gods themselves were carried away; therefore they are called "their gods." נסכיהם signifies here not drink-offerings, but molten images; the form is analogous to the plur. פּסילים, formed from פּסל; on the contrary, נסיכם libationes, Deuteronomy 32:38, stands for נסכּיהם, Isaiah 41:29. The suffix is not to be referred to אלהים, but, like the suffix in חמדּתם, to the inhabitants of the conquered country. וזהב כּסף are in apposition to חמדּתם כּלי, not the genitive of the subject (Kran.), because an attributive genitive cannot follow a noun determined by a suffix. Hv., v. Leng., Maurer, Hitzig, Ewald, and Klief. translate 'וגו יעמד שׁנים והוּא: he shall during (some) years stand off from the king of the north. Literally this translation may perhaps be justified, for עמד, c. מן, Genesis 29:35, has the meaning of "to leave off," and the expression "to stand off from war" may be used concisely for "to desist from making war" upon one. But this interpretation does not accord with the connection. First, it is opposed by the expressive והוּא, which cannot be understood, if nothing further should be said than that the king of the south, after he had overthrown the fortresses of the enemies' country, and had carried away their gods and their treasures, abstained from war for some years. The והוּא much rather leads us to this, that the passage introduced by it states some new important matter which does not of itself appear from the subjugation of the enemy and his kingdom. To this is to be added, that the contents of Daniel 11:9, where the subject to בּא can only be the king of the north, do not accord with the abstaining of the king of the south from warring against the king of the north. By Ewald's remark, "With such miserable marchings to and fro they mutually weaken themselves," the matter is not made intelligible. For the penetrating of the king of the south into the fortresses of his enemy, and the carrying away of his gods and his treasures, was not a miserable, useless expedition; but then we do not understand how the completely humbled king of the north, after his conqueror abstained from war, was in the condition to penetrate into his kingdom and then to return to his own land. Would his conqueror have suffered him to do this? We must, therefore, with Kranichfeld, Gesenius, de Wette, and Winer, after the example of the Syriac and Vulgate, take מן יעמד in the sense of: to stand out before, מן in the sense of מפּני, contra, as in Psalm 43:1 it is construed with ריב, which is supported by the circumstance that עמד in Daniel 11:6, Daniel 11:15, Daniel 11:17, and Daniel 11:25, has this meaning. By this not only is והוּא rightly translated: and he, the same who penetrated into the fortresses of his adversary and carried away his gods, shall also take his stand against him, assert his supremacy for years; but also Daniel 11:9 contains a suitable addition, for it shows how he kept his ground. The king of the north shall after some time invade the kingdom of the king of the south, but shall return to his own land, namely, because he can effect nothing. Kran. takes the king of the south as the subject to וּבא, Daniel 11:9; but this is impossible, for then the word must be בּמלכוּתו, particularly in parallelism with אדמתו. As the words stand, הנגב מלך, can only be the genitive to בּמלכוּת; thus the supposition that "the king of the south is the subject" is excluded, because the expression, "the king of the south comes into the kingdom of the south and returns to his own land," has no meaning when, according to the context, the south denotes Egypt. With the וּבא there also begins a change of the subject, which, though it appears contrary to the idiom of the German [and English] language, is frequently found in Hebrew; e.g., in Daniel 11:11 and Daniel 11:9. By the mention of an expedition of the king of the north into the kingdom of the king of the south, from which he again returned without having effected anything, the way is opened for passing to the following description of the supremacy of the king of the north over the king of the south.

Hosea 7:15 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I have.

2 Kings 13:5,23 (And the LORD gave Israel a savior, so that they went out from under the hand of the Syrians...

2 Kings 14:25-27 He restored the coast of Israel from the entering of Hamath to the sea of the plain, according to the word of the LORD God of Israel...

Psalm 106:43-45 Many times did he deliver them; but they provoked him with their counsel, and were brought low for their iniquity...

bound. or, chastened.

Job 5:17 Behold, happy is the man whom God corrects: therefore despise not you the chastening of the Almighty:

Psalm 94:12 Blessed is the man whom you chasten, O LORD, and teach him out of your law;

Proverbs 3:11 My son, despise not the chastening of the LORD; neither be weary of his correction:

Hebrews 12:5 And you have forgotten the exhortation which speaks to you as to children, My son, despise not you the chastening of the Lord...

Revelation 3:19 As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent.

imagine.

Psalm 2:1 Why do the heathen rage, and the people imagine a vain thing?

Psalm 62:3 How long will you imagine mischief against a man? you shall be slain all of you: as a bowing wall shall you be...

Jeremiah 17:9 The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?

Nahum 1:9 What do you imagine against the LORD? he will make an utter end: affliction shall not rise up the second time.

Acts 4:25 Who by the mouth of your servant David have said, Why did the heathen rage, and the people imagine vain things?

Romans 1:21 Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations...

2 Corinthians 10:5 Casting down imaginations, and every high thing that exalts itself against the knowledge of God...

Cross References
Psalm 140:2
who plan evil things in their heart and stir up wars continually.

Nahum 1:9
What do you plot against the LORD? He will make a complete end; trouble will not rise up a second time.

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