Habakkuk 1:7
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
They are dreaded and fearsome; their justice and dignity go forth from themselves.

King James Bible
They are terrible and dreadful: their judgment and their dignity shall proceed of themselves.

American Standard Version
They are terrible and dreadful; their judgment and their dignity proceed from themselves.

Douay-Rheims Bible
They are dreadful, and terrible: from themselves shall their judgment, and their burden proceed.

English Revised Version
They are terrible and dreadful: their judgment and their dignity proceed from themselves.

Webster's Bible Translation
They are terrible and dreadful: their judgment and their dignity shall proceed from themselves.

Habakkuk 1:7 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

The judgment will not stop at Samaria, however, but spread over Judah. The prophet depicts this by saying that he will go about mourning as a prisoner, to set forth the misery that will come upon Judah (Micah 1:8, Micah 1:9); and then, to confirm this, he announces to a series of cities the fate awaiting them, or rather awaiting the kingdom, by a continued play upon words founded upon their names (Micah 1:10-15); and finally he summons Zion to deep mourning (Micah 1:16). Micah 1:8. "Therefore will I lament and howl, I will go spoiled and naked: I will keep lamentation like the jackals, and mourning like the ostriches. Micah 1:9. For her stripes are malignant; for it comes to Judah, reaches to the gate of my people, to Jerusalem." על־זאת points back to what precedes, and is then explained in Micah 1:9. The prophet will lament over the destruction of Samaria, because the judgment which has befallen this city will come upon Judah also. Micah does not speak in his own name here as a patriot (Hitzig), but in the name of his nation, with which he identifies himself as being a member thereof. This is indisputably evident from the expression אילכה שׁילל וערום, which describes the costume of a prisoner, not that of a mourner. The form אילכה with י appears to have been simply suggested by אילילה. שׁילל is formed like הידד in Isaiah 16:9-10, and other similar words (see Olshausen, Gramm. p. 342). The Masoretes have substituted שׁלל, after Job 12:17, but without the slightest reason. It does not mean "barefooted," ἀνυπόδετος (lxx), for which there was already יחף in the language (2 Samuel 15:30; Isaiah 20:2-3; Jeremiah 2:25), but plundered, spoiled. ערום, naked, i.e., without upper garment (see my comm. on 1 Samuel 19:24), not merely vestitu solido et decente privatus. Mourners do indeed go barefooted (yâchēph, see 2 Samuel 15:30), and in deep mourning in a hairy garment (saq, 2 Samuel 3:31; Genesis 37:34, etc.), but not plundered and naked. The assertion, however, that a man was called ̀ârōm when he had put on a mourning garment (saq, sackcloth) in the place of his upper garment, derives no support from Isaiah 20:2, but rather a refutation. For there the prophet does not go about ‛ârōm veyâchēph, i.e., in the dress of a prisoner, to symbolize the captivity of Egypt, till after he has loosened the hairy garment (saq) from his loins, i.e., taken it off. And here also the plundering of the prophet and his walking naked are to be understood in the same way. Micah's intention is not only to exhibit publicly his mourning fore the approaching calamity of Judah, but also to set forth in a symbolical form the fate that awaits the Judaeans. And he can only do this by including himself in the nation, and exhibiting the fate of the nation in his own person. Wailing like jackals and ostriches is a loud, strong, mournful cry, those animals being distinguished by a mournful wail; see the comm. on Job 30:29, which passage may possibly have floated before the prophet's mind. Thus shall Judah wail, because the stroke which falls upon Samaria is a malignant, i.e., incurable (the suffix attached to מכּותיה refers to Shōmerōn, Samaria, in Micah 1:6 and Micah 1:7. For the singular of the predicate before a subject in the plural, see Ewald, 295, a, and 317, a). It reaches to Judah, yea, to Jerusalem. Jerusalem, as the capital, is called the "gate of my people," because in it par excellence the people went out and in. That עד is not exclusive here, but inclusive, embracing the terminus ad quem, is evident from the parallel "even to Judah;" for if it only reached to the border of Judah, it would not have been able to come to Jerusalem; and still more clearly so from the description in Micah 1:10. The fact that Jerusalem is not mentioned till after Judah is to be interpreted rhetorically, and not geographically. Even the capital, where the temple of Jehovah stood, would not be spared.

Habakkuk 1:7 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

their judgment, etc. or, from them shall proceed the judgment of these and the captivity of these.

Jeremiah 39:5-9 But the Chaldeans' army pursued after them, and overtook Zedekiah in the plains of Jericho: and when they had taken him...

Jeremiah 52:9-11,25-27 Then they took the king, and carried him up to the king of Babylon to Riblah in the land of Hamath; where he gave judgment on him...

Deuteronomy 5:19,27 Neither shall you steal...

Cross References
Isaiah 18:2
which sends ambassadors by the sea, in vessels of papyrus on the waters! Go, you swift messengers, to a nation tall and smooth, to a people feared near and far, a nation mighty and conquering, whose land the rivers divide.

Isaiah 18:7
At that time tribute will be brought to the LORD of hosts from a people tall and smooth, from a people feared near and far, a nation mighty and conquering, whose land the rivers divide, to Mount Zion, the place of the name of the LORD of hosts.

Jeremiah 39:5
But the army of the Chaldeans pursued them and overtook Zedekiah in the plains of Jericho. And when they had taken him, they brought him up to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, at Riblah, in the land of Hamath; and he passed sentence on him.

Daniel 2:31
"You saw, O king, and behold, a great image. This image, mighty and of exceeding brightness, stood before you, and its appearance was frightening.

Jump to Previous
Authority Dignity Dread Dreaded Dreadful Excellency Feared Fearful Forth Greatly Honor Itself Judgment Justice Law Majesty Originate Proceed Promote Right Terrible Themselves
Jump to Next
Authority Dignity Dread Dreaded Dreadful Excellency Feared Fearful Forth Greatly Honor Itself Judgment Justice Law Majesty Originate Proceed Promote Right Terrible Themselves
Links
Habakkuk 1:7 NIV
Habakkuk 1:7 NLT
Habakkuk 1:7 ESV
Habakkuk 1:7 NASB
Habakkuk 1:7 KJV

Habakkuk 1:7 Bible Apps
Habakkuk 1:7 Biblia Paralela
Habakkuk 1:7 Chinese Bible
Habakkuk 1:7 French Bible
Habakkuk 1:7 German Bible

Bible Hub

ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
Habakkuk 1:6
Top of Page
Top of Page