Exodus 21:26
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
“When a man strikes the eye of his slave, male or female, and destroys it, he shall let the slave go free because of his eye.

King James Bible
And if a man smite the eye of his servant, or the eye of his maid, that it perish; he shall let him go free for his eye's sake.

American Standard Version
And if a man smite the eye of his servant, or the eye of his maid, and destroy it; he shall let him go free for his eye's sake.

Douay-Rheims Bible
If any man strike the eye of his manservant or maidservant, and leave them but one eye, he shall let them go free for the eye which he put out.

English Revised Version
And if a man smite the eye of his servant, or the eye of his maid, and destroy it; he shall let him go free for his eye's sake.

Webster's Bible Translation
And if a man shall smite the eye of his servant, or the eye of his maid, that it shall perish; he shall let him go free for his eye's sake.

Exodus 21:26 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

The case was different with regard to a slave. The master had always the right to punish or "chasten" him with a stick (Proverbs 10:13; Proverbs 13:24); this right was involved in the paternal authority of the master over the servants in his possession. The law was therefore confined to the abuse of this authority in outbursts of passion, in which case, "if the servant or the maid should die under his hand (i.e., under his blows), he was to be punished" (ינּקם נקם: "vengeance shall surely be taken"). But in what the נקם was to consist is not explained; certainly not in slaying by the sword, as the Jewish commentators maintain. The lawgiver would have expressed this by יוּמת מות. No doubt it was left to the authorities to determine this according to the circumstances. The law in Exodus 21:12 could hardly be applied to a case of this description, although it was afterwards extended to foreigners as well as natives (Leviticus 24:21-22), for the simple reason, that it is hardly conceivable that a master would intentionally kill his slave, who was his possession and money. How far the lawgiver was from presupposing any such intention here, is evident from the law which follows in Exodus 21:21, "Notwithstanding, if he continue a day or two (i.e., remain alive), it shall not be avenged, for he is his money." By the continuance of his life, if only for a day or two, it would become perfectly evident that the master did not wish to kill his servant; and if nevertheless he died after this, the loss of the slave was punishment enough for the master. There is no ground whatever for restricting this regulation, as the Rabbins do, to slaves who were not of Hebrew extraction.

Exodus 21:26 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Exodus 21:20 And if a man smite his servant, or his maid, with a rod, and he die under his hand; he shall be surely punished.

Deuteronomy 16:19 You shall not wrest judgment; you shall not respect persons, neither take a gift: for a gift does blind the eyes of the wise...

Nehemiah 5:5 Yet now our flesh is as the flesh of our brothers, our children as their children: and, see...

Job 31:13-15 If I did despise the cause of my manservant or of my maidservant, when they contended with me...

Psalm 9:12 When he makes inquisition for blood, he remembers them: he forgets not the cry of the humble.

Psalm 10:14,18 You have seen it; for you behold mischief and spite, to requite it with your hand: the poor commits himself to you...

Psalm 72:12-14 For he shall deliver the needy when he cries; the poor also, and him that has no helper...

Proverbs 22:22,23 Rob not the poor, because he is poor: neither oppress the afflicted in the gate...

Ephesians 6:9 And, you masters, do the same things to them, forbearing threatening: knowing that your Master also is in heaven...

Colossians 4:1 Masters, give to your servants that which is just and equal; knowing that you also have a Master in heaven.

Exodus 21:25
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