Esther 1:8
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
And drinking was according to this edict: “There is no compulsion.” For the king had given orders to all the staff of his palace to do as each man desired.

King James Bible
And the drinking was according to the law; none did compel: for so the king had appointed to all the officers of his house, that they should do according to every man's pleasure.

American Standard Version
And the drinking was according to the law; none could compel: for so the king had appointed to all the officers of his house, that they should do according to every man's pleasure.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Neither was there any one to compel them to drink that were not willing, but as the king had appointed, who set over every table one of his nobles, that every man might take what he would.

English Revised Version
And the drinking was according to the law; none could compel: for so the king had appointed to all the officers of his house, that they should do according to every man's pleasure.

Webster's Bible Translation
And the drinking was according to the law; none constrained: for so the king had appointed to all the officers of his house, that they should do according to every man's pleasure.

Esther 1:8 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

The words: in those days, take up the chronological statement of Esther 1:1, and add thereto the new particular: when King Ahashverosh sat on the throne of his kingdom in the citadel of Susa. שׁבת does not involve the notion of quiet and peaceable possession after the termination of wars (Clericus, Rambach), but that of being seated on the throne with royal authority. Thus the Persian kings are always represented upon a raised seat or throne, even on journeys and in battle. According to Herod. vii. 102, Xerxes watched the battle of Thermopylae sitting upon his throne. And Plutarch (Themistocl. c. 13) says the same of the battle of Salamis. Further examples are given by Baumg. l.c. p. 85f. On the citadel of Susa, see Nehemiah 1:1, and remarks on Daniel 8:2.

Esther 1:8 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

none did compel. Every person drank what he pleased. Among the Greeks, however, each guest was obliged to keep the round, or leave the company: hence the proverb Drink, or begone. Mr. Herbert, in his poem entitled The Church Porch, has severely reprobated this vile custom. In Britain, however, this demoralizing custom is now almost destroyed, and a new era of social pleasure is arising, by temperate habits, increased domestic comforts, and the spread of gospel truths.

Jeremiah 35:8 Thus have we obeyed the voice of Jonadab the son of Rechab our father in all that he has charged us, to drink no wine all our days, we...

Jeremiah 51:7 Babylon has been a golden cup in the LORD's hand, that made all the earth drunken: the nations have drunken of her wine...

Habakkuk 2:15,16 Woe to him that gives his neighbor drink, that put your bottle to him, and make him drunken also, that you may look on their nakedness!...

the officers.

John 2:8 And he said to them, Draw out now, and bear to the governor of the feast. And they bore it.

Esther 1:7
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