2 Samuel 19:9
And all the people were at strife throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, The king saved us out of the hand of our enemies, and he delivered us out of the hand of the Philistines; and now he is fled out of the land for Absalom.
Jump to: BarnesBensonBICambridgeClarkeDarbyEllicottExpositor'sExp DctGaebeleinGSBGillGrayHaydockHastingsHomileticsJFBKDKJTLangeMacLarenMHCMHCWParkerPoolePulpitSermonSCOTTBWESTSK
EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(9) The king saved us.—With the collapse of the rebellion the accompanying infatuation passed away, and the people began to remember how much they owed to David. There seems to have been a general disposition among the people to return to their allegiance, yet the movement was without organisation or leadership.

2 Samuel 19:9-10. All the people were at strife throughout all the tribes — Either, 1st, Striving who should be most forward to bring back the king, and blaming one another’s slackness in the business: or, 2d, Censuring and quarrelling one with another, as the authors and abetters of this shameful rebellion, and discoursing privately and publicly of David’s high merits, which God, being now reconciled to him, brings afresh to their memories. Now, therefore, why speak ye not a word, &c. — The people of Israel speak thus to their elders, as appears by comparing this verse with the next. Seeing their designs for raising Absalom to the throne disappointed, they now repented of that undertaking, and were willing to testify this by their forwardness to bring David back, and re-establish him.19:9-15 God's providence, by the priests' persuasions and Amasa's interest, brought the people to resolve the recall of the king. David stirred not till he received this invitation. Our Lord Jesus will rule in those that invite him to the throne in their hearts, and not till he is invited. He first bows the heart, and makes it willing in the day of his power, then rules in the midst of his enemies, Ps 110:2,3.David saw the justice of what Joab said, and the new danger which threatened him if he did not rouse himself from his grief.

For Israel ... - Not David's followers, but as before 2 Samuel 17:26; 2 Samuel 18:6, 2 Samuel 18:17, Absalom's army.

2Sa 19:9-43. The Israelites Bring the King Back.

9-11. all the people were at strife throughout all the tribes of Israel—The kingdom was completely disorganized. The sentiments of three different parties are represented in 2Sa 19:9, 10: the royalists, the adherents of Absalom who had been very numerous, and those who were indifferent to the Davidic dynasty. In these circumstances the king was right in not hastening back, as a conqueror, to reascend his throne. A re-election was, in some measure, necessary. He remained for some time on the other side of Jordan, in expectation of being invited back. That invitation was given without, however, the concurrence of Judah. David, disappointed and vexed by his own tribe's apparent lukewarmness, despatched the two high priests to rouse the Judahites to take a prominent interest in his cause. It was the act of a skilful politician. Hebron having been the seat of the rebellion, it was graceful on his part to encourage their return to allegiance and duty; it was an appeal to their honor not to be the last of the tribes. But this separate message, and the preference given to them, occasioned an outburst of jealousy among the other tribes that was nearly followed by fatal consequences [see 2Sa 19:40-43].

All the people were at strife; quarrelling one with another, as the authors or abettors of this shameful and cursed rebellion, discoursing privately and publicly of David’s high merits, which God, being now reconciled to David, brings afresh to their memories, and reneweth the sense of their obligations to their king, which they had lately shaken off. Thus the crowns of kings sit faster or looser upon their heads, as God is pleased to dispose of the thoughts and hearts of their people, which he can turn in an instant which way he will.

Now he is fled out of the land for Absalom: now we come to reflect upon our own actions, we are sensible of our folly and unworthiness in adhering to Absalom, and thereby forcing David to flee out of the land of Canaan to the parts beyond Jordan for his security. And all the people were at strife through all the tribes of Israel,.... Excepting the tribe of Judah; they blamed and reproved one another for taking part with Absalom in the rebellion, and especially for their coldness and backwardness in bringing back David to Jerusalem:

saying, the king saved us out of the hand of our enemies; exposed his life to danger, fought our battles for us, and gained us victory over our enemies, and saved us from them, especially those next mentioned:

and he delivered us out of the hand of the Philistines; in the times of Saul, and since; which were benefits which ought to have endeared him to them, and were aggravations of the crime of those who had been concerned in the late rebellion; and were such as ought not to be buried in oblivion, and were proper arguments to engage them to return to their allegiance to him, and abide by it:

and now he is fled out of the land for Absalom; being obliged to quit Jerusalem, and the land of Judea on this side Jordan, and to pass that river; not from a spirit of cowardice, but from tenderness to his son, he did not choose to fight against; and from a concern for his metropolis Jerusalem, lest that should be hurt, as well as for the safety of his person.

And all the people were at {d} strife throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, The king saved us out of the hand of our enemies, and he delivered us out of the hand of the Philistines; and now he is fled out of the land for Absalom.

(d) Everyone blamed another and strove who should first bring him home.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
David's mourning, and Joab's reproof. - 2 Samuel 19:1-6. When Joab was told that the king was mourning and weeping for Absalom, he went to him into the house to expostulate with him. 2 Samuel 19:5 introduces the continuation of 2 Samuel 19:1; 2 Samuel 19:2-4 contain parenthetical sentences, describing the impression made upon the people by the king's mourning. Through the king's deep trouble, the salvation (the victory) upon that day became mourning for all the people who had fought for David, and they went by stealth in to the city (לבוא יתגּנּב: they stole to come, came by stealth), "as people steal away who have covered themselves with shame, when they flee in battle."
Links
2 Samuel 19:9 Interlinear
2 Samuel 19:9 Parallel Texts


2 Samuel 19:9 NIV
2 Samuel 19:9 NLT
2 Samuel 19:9 ESV
2 Samuel 19:9 NASB
2 Samuel 19:9 KJV

2 Samuel 19:9 Bible Apps
2 Samuel 19:9 Parallel
2 Samuel 19:9 Biblia Paralela
2 Samuel 19:9 Chinese Bible
2 Samuel 19:9 French Bible
2 Samuel 19:9 German Bible

Bible Hub






2 Samuel 19:8
Top of Page
Top of Page