Ecclesiastes 10:9
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Whoever quarries stones may be injured by them; whoever splits logs may be endangered by them.

King James Bible
Whoso removeth stones shall be hurt therewith; and he that cleaveth wood shall be endangered thereby.

Darby Bible Translation
Whoso removeth stones is hurt therewith; he that cleaveth wood is endangered thereby.

World English Bible
Whoever carves out stones may be injured by them. Whoever splits wood may be endangered thereby.

Young's Literal Translation
Whoso is removing stones is grieved by them, Whoso is cleaving trees endangered by them.

Ecclesiastes 10:9 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

Whoso removeth stones - This verse teaches care and caution. Whoever pulls down an old building is likely to be hurt by the stones; and in cleaving wood many accidents occur for want of sufficient caution.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Ecclesiastes 10:8 He who digs a pit may fall into it, and a serpent may bite him who breaks through a wall.

Ecclesiastes 10:10 If the axe is dull and he does not sharpen its edge, then he must exert more strength. Wisdom has the advantage of giving success.

Library
The Way to the City
'The labour of the foolish wearieth every one of them, because he knoweth not how to go to the city.'--ECCLES. x. 15. On the surface this seems to be merely a piece of homely, practical sagacity, conjoined with one of the bitter things which Ecclesiastes is fond of saying about those whom he calls 'fools.' It seems to repeat, under another metaphor, the same idea which has been presented in a previous verse, where we read: 'If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions of Holy Scripture

Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners Or, a Brief Relation of the Exceeding Mercy of God in Christ, to his Poor Servant, John Bunyan
In this my relation of the merciful working of God upon my soul, it will not be amiss, if in the first place, I do in a few words give you a hint of my pedigree, and manner of bringing up; that thereby the goodness and bounty of God towards me, may be the more advanced and magnified before the sons of men. 2. For my descent then, it was, as is well known by many, of a low and inconsiderable generation; my father's house being of that rank that is meanest, and most despised of all the families in
John Bunyan—Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners

Ecclesiastes 10:8
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