Psalm 9:12
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
For he who avenges blood is mindful of them; he does not forget the cry of the afflicted.

King James Bible
When he maketh inquisition for blood, he remembereth them: he forgetteth not the cry of the humble.

American Standard Version
For he that maketh inquisition for blood remembereth them; He forgetteth not the cry of the poor.

Douay-Rheims Bible
For requiring their blood he hath remembered the: he hath not forgotten the cry of the poor.

English Revised Version
For he that maketh inquisition for blood remembereth them: he forgetteth not the cry of the poor.

Webster's Bible Translation
When he maketh inquisition for blood, he remembereth them: he forgetteth not the cry of the humble.

Psalm 9:12 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

(Heb.: 9:6-7) The strophe with ג, which is perhaps intended to represent ד and ה as well, continues the confirmation of the cause for thanksgiving laid down in Psalm 9:4. He does not celebrate the judicial act of God on his behalf, which he has just experienced, alone, but in connection with, and, as it were, as the sum of many others which have preceded it. If this is the case, then in Psalm 9:6 beside the Ammonites one may at the same time (with Hengstenb.) think of the Amalekites (1 Samuel 8:12), who had been threatened since the time of Moses with a "blotting out of their remembrance" (Exodus 17:14; Deuteronomy 25:19, cf. Numbers 24:20). The divine threatening is the word of omnipotence which destroys in distinction from the word of omnipotence that creates. רשׁע in close connection with גּוים is individualising, cf. Psalm 9:18 with Psalm 9:16, Psalm 9:17. ועד is a sharpened pausal form for ועד, the Pathach going into a Segol (קטן פתח); perhaps it is in order to avoid the threefold a-sound in לעולם ועד (Ngelsbach 8 extr.). In Psalm 9:7 האויב (with Azla legarme) appears to be a vocative. In that case נתשׁתּ ought also to be addressed to the enemy. But if it be interpreted: "Thou hast destroyed thine own cities, their memorial is perished," destroyed, viz., at the challenge of Israel, then the thought is forced; and if we render it: "the cities, which thou hast destroyed, perished is the remembrance of them," i.e., one no longer thinks of thine acts of conquest, then we have a thought that is in itself awkward and one that finds no support in any of the numerous parallels which speak of a blotting out and leaving no trace behind. But, moreover, in both these interpretations the fact that זכרם is strengthened by המּה is lost sight of, and the twofold masculine זכרם המּה is referred to ערים (which is carelessly done by most expositors), whereas עיר, with but few exceptions, is feminine; consequently זכרם המה, so far as this is not absolutely impossible, must be referred to the enemies themselves (cf. Psalm 34:17; Psalm 109:15). האויב might more readily be nom. absol.: "the enemy - it is at end for ever with his destructions," but חרבּה never has an active but always only a neuter signification; or: "the enemy - ruins are finished for ever," but the signification to be destroyed is more natural for תּמם than to be completed, when it is used of ruinae. Moreover, in connection with both these renderings the retrospective pronoun (חרבותיו) is wanting, and this is also the case with the reading חרבות (lxx, Vulg., Syr.), which leaves it uncertain whose swords are meant. But why may we not rather connect האויב at once with תּמּוּ as subject? In other instances תּמּוּ is also joined to a singular collective subject, e.g., Isaiah 16:4; here it precedes, like הארב in Judges 20:37. חרבות לנצח is a nominative of the product, corresponding to the factitive object with verbs of making: the enemies are destroyed as ruins for ever, i.e., so that they are become ruins; or, more in accordance with the accentuation: the enemy, destroyed as ruins are they for ever. With respect to what follows the accentuation also contains hints worthy of our attention. It does not take נתשׁתּ (with the regular Pathach by Athnach after Olewejored, vid., on Psalm 2:7) as a relative clause, and consequently does not require זכרם המה to be referred back to ערים.

We interpret the passage thus: and cities (viz., such as were hostile) thou hast destroyed (נתשׁ evellere, exstirpare), perished is their (the enemies') memorial. Thus it also now becomes intelligible, why זכרם, according to the rule Ges. 121, 3, is so remarkably strengthened by the addition of המּה (cf. Numbers 14:32; 1 Samuel 20:42; Proverbs 22:19; Proverbs 23:15; Ezekiel 34:11). Hupfeld, whose interpretation is exactly the same as ours, thinks it might perhaps be the enemies themselves and the cities set over against one another. But the contrast follows in Psalm 9:8 : their, even their memorial is perished, while on the contrary Jahve endures for ever and is enthroned as judge. This contrast also retrospectively gives support to the explanation, that זכרם refers not to the cities, but to האויב as a collective. With this interpretation of Psalm 9:7 we have no occasion to read זכרם מהמּה (Targ.), nor זכר מהמּה (Paul., Hitz.). The latter is strongly commended by Job 11:20, cf. Jeremiah 10:2; but still it is not quite admissible, since זכר here is not subjective (their own remembrance) but objective (remembrance of them). But may not ערים perhaps here, as in Psalm 139:20, mean zealots equals adversaries (from עיר fervere, zelare)? We reply in the negative, because the Psalm bears neither an Aramaising nor a North Palestinian impress. Even in connection with this meaning, the harshness of the ערים without any suffix would still remain. But, that the cities that are, as it were, plucked up by the root are cities of the enemy, is evident from the context.

Psalm 9:12 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

When

Genesis 9:5 And surely your blood of your lives will I require; at the hand of every beast will I require it, and at the hand of man...

2 Kings 24:4 And also for the innocent blood that he shed: for he filled Jerusalem with innocent blood; which the LORD would not pardon.

Isaiah 26:21 For, behold, the LORD comes out of his place to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity...

Matthew 23:35 That on you may come all the righteous blood shed on the earth...

Luke 11:50,51 That the blood of all the prophets, which was shed from the foundation of the world, may be required of this generation...

Revelation 6:9,10 And when he had opened the fifth seal, I saw under the altar the souls of them that were slain for the word of God...

Revelation 16:6 For they have shed the blood of saints and prophets, and you have given them blood to drink; for they are worthy.

he forgetteth

Psalm 10:14,17 You have seen it; for you behold mischief and spite, to requite it with your hand: the poor commits himself to you...

Psalm 22:24 For he has not despised nor abhorred the affliction of the afflicted; neither has he hid his face from him; but when he cried to him...

Psalm 34:6 This poor man cried, and the LORD heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles.

Psalm 102:17 He will regard the prayer of the destitute, and not despise their prayer.

Exodus 3:7,9 And the LORD said, I have surely seen the affliction of my people which are in Egypt...

Luke 18:7,8 And shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night to him, though he bear long with them...

humble. or, afflicted

Judges 10:16 And they put away the strange gods from among them, and served the LORD: and his soul was grieved for the misery of Israel.

Cross References
Genesis 9:5
And for your lifeblood I will require a reckoning: from every beast I will require it and from man. From his fellow man I will require a reckoning for the life of man.

Genesis 42:22
And Reuben answered them, "Did I not tell you not to sin against the boy? But you did not listen. So now there comes a reckoning for his blood."

2 Samuel 4:11
How much more, when wicked men have killed a righteous man in his own house on his bed, shall I not now require his blood at your hand and destroy you from the earth?"

Psalm 9:18
For the needy shall not always be forgotten, and the hope of the poor shall not perish forever.

Psalm 10:12
Arise, O LORD; O God, lift up your hand; forget not the afflicted.

Psalm 72:14
From oppression and violence he redeems their life, and precious is their blood in his sight.

Psalm 136:23
It is he who remembered us in our low estate, for his steadfast love endures forever;

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