Proverbs 25:16
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
If you have found honey, eat only enough for you, lest you have your fill of it and vomit it.

King James Bible
Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it.

American Standard Version
Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, Lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Thou hast found honey, eat what is sufficient for thee, lest being glutted therewith thou vomit it up.

English Revised Version
Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee; lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it.

Webster's Bible Translation
Hast thou found honey? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled with it, and vomit it.

Proverbs 25:16 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

8 Go not forth hastily to strife,

   That it may not be said, "What wilt thou do in the end thereof,

   When now thy neighbour bringeth disgrace upon thee?"

9 Art thou striving with thy neighbour? strive with him,

   But disclose not the secret of another;

10 That he who heareth it may not despise thee,

   And thine evil name depart no more.

Whether ריב in לריב is infin., as at Judges 21:22, or subst., as at 2 Chronicles 19:8, is not decided: ad litigandum and ad litem harmonize. As little may it be said whether in אל־תּצא [go not forth], a going out to the gate (court of justice), or to the place where he is to be met who is to be called to account, is to be thought of; in no respect is the sense metaphorical: let not thyself transgress the bounds of moderation, ne te laisse pas emporter; יצא לרב is correlate to בּוא לרוב, Judges 21:22. The use of פּן in 8b is unprecedented. Euchel and Lwenstein regard it as an imper.: reflect upon it (test it); but פּנה does not signify this, and the interjectional הס does not show the possibility of an imper. Kal פּן, and certainly not פּן (פּן). The conj. פּן is the connecting form of an original subst. ( equals panj), which signifies a turning away. It is mostly connected with the future, according to which Nolde, Oetinger, Ewald, and Bertheau explain מה indefinite, something, viz., unbecoming. In itself, it may, perhaps, be possible that פן מה was used in the sense of ne quid (Venet. μήποτέ τι); but "to do something," for "to commit something bad," is improbable; also in that case we would expect the words to be thus: פן תעשׂה מה. Thus מה will be an interrogative, as at 1 Samuel 20:10 (vid., Keil), and the expression is brachyogical: that thou comest not into the situation not to know what thou oughtest to do (Rashi: פן תבא לידי לא תדע הם לעשׂות), or much rather anakoluth.; for instead of saying פּן־לא תדע מה־לּעשׂות, the poet, shunning this unusual פן לא, adopts at once the interrogative form: that it may not be said at the end thereof (viz., of the strife); what wilt thou do? (Umbreit, Stier, Elster, Hitzig, and Zckler). This extreme perplexity would occur if thy neighbour (with whom thou disputest so eagerly and unjustly) put thee to shame, so that thou standest confounded (כלם, properly to hurt, French blesser). If now the summons 9a follows this warning against going out for the purpose of strife: fight out thy conflict with thy neighbour, then ריבך, set forth with emphasis, denotes not such a strife as one is surprised into, but that into which one is drawn, and the tuam in causam tuam is accented in so far as 9b localizes the strife to the personal relation of the two, and warns against the drawing in of an אחר, i.e., in this case, of a third person: and expose not the secret of another אל־תּגל (after Michlol 130a, and Ben-Bileam, who places the word under the 'פ'פתחין בס, is vocalized with Pathach on ג, as is Cod. 1294, and elsewhere in correct texts). One ought not to bring forward in a dispute, as material of proof and means of acquittal, secrets entrusted to him by another, or secrets which one knows regarding the position and conduct of another; for such faithlessness and gossiping affix a stigma on him who avails himself of them, in the public estimation, Proverbs 25:10; that he who hears it may not blame thee (חסּד equals Aram. חסּד, vid., under Proverbs 14:34), and the evil report concerning thee continue without recall. Fleischer: ne infamia tua non recedat i.e., nunquam desinat per ora hominum propagari, with the remark, "in דבּה, which properly means in stealthy creeping on of the rumour, and in שׁוּב lies a (Arab.) tarshyḥ," i.e., the two ideas stand in an interchangeable relation with a play upon the words: the evil rumour, once put in circulation, will not again retrace its steps; but, on the contrary, as Virgil says:

Mobilitate viget viresque acquirit eundo.

In fact, every other can sooner rehabilitate himself in the public estimation that he who is regarded as a prattler, who can keep no secret, or as one so devoid of character that he makes public what he ought to keep silent, if he can make any use of it in his own interest. In regard to such an one, the words are continually applicable, hic niger est, hunc tu, Romane, caveto, Proverbs 20:19. The lxx has, instead of ודבתך 10b, read ומריבתך, and translated it with the addition of a long appendix: "They quarrel, and hostilities will not cease, but will be to thee like death. Kindness and friendship deliver, let these preserve thee, that thou mayest not become one meriting reproaches (Jerome: ne exprobrabilis fias), but guard thy ways, εὐσυναλλάκτως."

Proverbs 25:16 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

hath

Proverbs 24:13,14 My son, eat you honey, because it is good; and the honeycomb, which is sweet to your taste...

Judges 14:8,9 And after a time he returned to take her, and he turned aside to see the carcass of the lion: and, behold...

1 Samuel 14:25-27 And all they of the land came to a wood; and there was honey on the ground...

Isaiah 7:15,22 Butter and honey shall he eat, that he may know to refuse the evil, and choose the good...

lest

Proverbs 26:27 Whoever digs a pit shall fall therein: and he that rolls a stone, it will return on him.

Proverbs 23:8 The morsel which you have eaten shall you vomit up, and lose your sweet words.

Luke 21:34 And take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life...

Ephesians 5:18 And be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess; but be filled with the Spirit;

Cross References
Judges 14:8
After some days he returned to take her. And he turned aside to see the carcass of the lion, and behold, there was a swarm of bees in the body of the lion, and honey.

1 Samuel 14:25
Now when all the people came to the forest, behold, there was honey on the ground.

Proverbs 23:8
You will vomit up the morsels that you have eaten, and waste your pleasant words.

Proverbs 24:13
My son, eat honey, for it is good, and the drippings of the honeycomb are sweet to your taste.

Proverbs 25:17
Let your foot be seldom in your neighbor's house, lest he have his fill of you and hate you.

Ecclesiastes 7:16
Be not overly righteous, and do not make yourself too wise. Why should you destroy yourself?

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