Jeremiah 39:12
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
“Take him, look after him well, and do him no harm, but deal with him as he tells you.”

King James Bible
Take him, and look well to him, and do him no harm; but do unto him even as he shall say unto thee.

American Standard Version
Take him, and look well to him, and do him no harm; but do unto him even as he shall say unto thee.

Douay-Rheims Bible
Take him, and set thy eyes upon him, and do him no harm: but as he hath a mind, so do with him.

English Revised Version
Take him, and look well to him, and do him no harm; but do unto him even as he shall say unto thee.

Webster's Bible Translation
Take him, and look well to him, and do him no harm; but do to him even as he shall say to thee.

Jeremiah 39:12 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

In Jeremiah 39:4-7 are narrated the flight of Zedekiah, his capture, and his condemnation, like what we find in Jeremiah 52:7-11 and 2 Kings 25:4-7. "When Zedekiah the king of Judah and all the men of war saw them (the Chaldean generals who had taken up their position at the mid-gate), they fled by night out of the city, by the way of the king's garden, by a gate between the walls, and he went out by the way to the Arabah. Jeremiah 39:5. But the army of the Chaldeans pursued after them, and overtook Zedekiah in the steppes of Jericho, and captured him, and brought him to Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, to Riblah, in the land of Hamath; and he pronounced judgment on him." Hitzig and Graf consider that the connection of these events, made by כּאשׁר ראם, is awkward, and say that the king would not have waited till the Chaldean generals took up their position at the mid-gate, nor could he see these in the night-time; that, moreover, he would hardly have waited till the city was taken before he fled. These objections are utterly worthless. If the city of Zion, in which the royal palace stood, was separated from the lower city by a wall, then the king might still be quite at ease, with his men of war, in the upper city or city of Zion, so long as the enemy, who were pushing into the lower city from the north, remained at the separating wall, near the middle gate in it; and only when he saw that the city of Zion, too, could no longer be held, did he need to betake himself to flight with the men of war around him. In actual fact, then, he might have been able to see the Chaldean generals with his own eyes, although we need not press ראם so much as to extract this meaning from it. Even at this juncture, flight was still possible through the south gate, at the king's garden, between the two walls. Thenius, on 2 Kings 25:4, takes חמתים to mean a double wall, which at the southern end of Ophel closed up the ravine between Ophel and Zion. But a double wall must also have had two gates, and Thenius, indeed, has exhibited them in his plan of Jerusalem; but the text speaks of but one gate (שׁער). "The two walls" are rather the walls which ran along the eastern border of Zion and the western border of Ophel. The gate between these was situated in the wall which ran across the Tyropoean valley, and united the wall of Zion and that of Ophel; it was called the horse-gate (Nehemiah 3:28), and occupied the position of the modern "dung-gate" (Bab-el Moghribeh); see on Nehemiah 3:27-28. It was not the "gate of the fountain," as Thenius (Bcher der Kn. S. 456), Ngelsbach, and others imagine, founding on the supposed existence of the double wall at the south end of Ophel. Outside this gate, where the valley of the Tyropoeon joined with the valley of the Kidron, lay the king's garden, in the vicinity of the pool of Siloam; see on Nehemiah 3:15. The words 'ויּצא וגו introduce further details as to the king's flight. In spite of the preceding plurals ויּברחוּ , the sing. יצא is quite suitable here, since the narrator wishes to give further details with regard to the flight of the king alone, without bringing into consideration the warriors who fled along with him. Nor does the following אחריהם militate against this view; for the Chaldean warriors pursued the king and his followers, not to capture these followers, but the king. Escaped from the city, the king took the direction of the ערבה, the plain of the Jordan, in order to escape over Jordan to Gilead. But the pursuing enemy overtook him in the steppes of Jericho (see Comm. on Joshua on Joshua 4:13), and thus before he had crossed the Jordan; they led him, bound, to Riblah, before the king of Babylon. "Riblah in the land of Hamath" is still called Ribleh, a wretched village about 20 miles S.S.W. from Hums (Emesa) on the river el Ahsy (Orontes), in a large fertile plain in the northern portion of the Beka, on the great caravan-track which passes from Palestine through Damascus, Emesa, and Hamath to Thapsacus and Carchemish on the Euphrates; see Robinson's Bibl. Res. iii. 545, and on Comm. on Kings at 2 Kings 23:33. - On דּבּר משׁפּטים, to speak judgment, pronounce sentence of punishment, see on Jeremiah 1:16. Nebuchadnezzar caused the sons of Zedekiah and all the princes of Judah (חרים, nobles, lords, as in 27:30) to be slain before the eyes of the Jewish king; then he put out his eyes and bound him with brazen fetters, to carry him away to Babylon (לביא for להביא), where, according to Jeremiah 52:11, he remained in confinement till his death.

Jeremiah 39:12 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

look well to him. Heb. set thine eyes upon him.

Jeremiah 24:6 For I will set my eyes on them for good, and I will bring them again to this land: and I will build them, and not pull them down...

Jeremiah 40:4 And now, behold, I loose you this day from the chains which were on your hand. If it seem good to you to come with me into Babylon...

Proverbs 23:5 Will you set your eyes on that which is not? for riches certainly make themselves wings; they fly away as an eagle toward heaven.

Amos 9:4 And though they go into captivity before their enemies, there will I command the sword, and it shall slay them...

1 Peter 3:12 For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears are open to their prayers...

do him.

Psalm 105:14,15 He suffered no man to do them wrong: yes, he reproved kings for their sakes...

Proverbs 16:7 When a man's ways please the LORD, he makes even his enemies to be at peace with him.

Proverbs 21:1 The king's heart is in the hand of the LORD, as the rivers of water: he turns it wherever he will.

Acts 7:10 And delivered him out of all his afflictions, and gave him favor and wisdom in the sight of Pharaoh king of Egypt...

1 Peter 3:13 And who is he that will harm you, if you be followers of that which is good?

Cross References
1 Peter 3:13
Now who is there to harm you if you are zealous for what is good?

Psalm 105:14
he allowed no one to oppress them; he rebuked kings on their account,

Psalm 105:15
saying, "Touch not my anointed ones, do my prophets no harm!"

Proverbs 16:7
When a man's ways please the LORD, he makes even his enemies to be at peace with him.

Proverbs 21:1
The king's heart is a stream of water in the hand of the LORD; he turns it wherever he will.

Jeremiah 15:21
I will deliver you out of the hand of the wicked, and redeem you from the grasp of the ruthless."

Jeremiah 39:13
So Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard, Nebushazban the Rab-saris, Nergal-sar-ezer the Rab-mag, and all the chief officers of the king of Babylon

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