Jeremiah 15:18
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
Why is my pain unceasing, my wound incurable, refusing to be healed? Will you be to me like a deceitful brook, like waters that fail?

King James Bible
Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable, which refuseth to be healed? wilt thou be altogether unto me as a liar, and as waters that fail?

American Standard Version
Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable, which refuseth to be healed? wilt thou indeed be unto me as a deceitful brook , as waters that fail?

Douay-Rheims Bible
Why is my sorrow become perpetual, and my wound desperate so as to refuse to be healed? it is become to me as the falsehood of deceitful waters that cannot be trusted.

English Revised Version
Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable, which refuseth to be healed? wilt thou indeed be unto me as a deceitful brook, as waters that fail?

Webster's Bible Translation
Why is my pain perpetual, and my wound incurable, which refuseth to be healed? wilt thou be altogether to me as a liar, and as waters that fail?

Jeremiah 15:18 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

That the case will turn out so is intimated by Jeremiah 15:12-14, the exposition of which is, however, difficult and much debated. Jeremiah 15:12 is rendered either: can iron (ordinary iron) break northern iron and brass (the first "iron" being taken as subject, the second as object)? or: can one break iron, (namely) iron of the north, and brass ("iron" being taken both times as object, and "break" having its subject indefinite)? or: can iron...break (ירוע intrans. as in Jeremiah 11:16)? Of these three translations the first has little probability, inasmuch as the simile of one kind of iron breaking another is unnatural. But Hitz.'s view is wholly unnatural: that the first "iron" and "brass" are the object, and that "iron from the north" is subject, standing as it does between the two objects, as in Sol 5:6, where, however, the construction alleged is still very doubtful. Nor does the sense, which would in this way be expressed, go far to commend this rendering. By iron and brass we would then have to understand, according to Jeremiah 6:28, the stiff-necked Jewish people; and by iron from the north, the calamity that was to come from the north. Thus the sense would be: will this calamity break the sullen obstinacy of the prophet's enemies? will it make them pliable? The verse would thus contain an objection on the part of the prophet against the concession vouchsafed by God in Jeremiah 15:11. With this idea, however, Jeremiah 15:11-14 are emphatically not in harmony. The other two translations take each a different view of the sense. The one party understand by iron and brass the prophet; the other, either the Jewish people or the northern might of the Chaldean empire. Holding that the prophet is so symbolized, L. de Dieu and Umbr. give the sense thus: "Let him but bethink him of his immoveable firmness against the onsets of the world; in spite of all, he is iron, northern iron and brass, that cannot be broken." Thus God would here be speaking to the prophet. Dahl., again, holds the verse to be spoken by the prophet, and gives the sense: Can I, a frail and feeble man, break the determination of a numerous and stiff-necked nation? Against the later view the objection already alleged against Hitz. is decisive, showing as it did that the verse cannot be the prophet's speech or complaint; against the former, the improbability that God would call the prophet iron, northern iron and brass, when the very complaint he has making showed how little of the firmness of iron he had about him. If by the northern iron we understand the Jewish people, then God would here say to the prophet, that he should always contend in vain against the stiff-neckedness of the people (Eichh.). This would have been but small comfort for him. But the appellation of northern iron does not at all fit the Jewish people. For the observation that the hardest iron, the steel made by the Chalybes in Pontus, was imported from the north, does not serve the turn; since a distinction between ordinary iron and very hard iron nowhere else appears in the Old Testament. The attribute "from the north" points manifestly to the iron sway of the Chaldean empire (Ros., Ew., Maur., and many others); and the meaning of the verse can only be this: As little as a man can break iron, will the Jewish people be able to break the hostile power of the north (Jeremiah 13:20). Taken thus, the pictorial style of the verse contains a suggestion that the adversaries of the prophet will, by the crushing power of the Chaldeans, be reduced to the condition of turning themselves in supplication to the prophet.

Jeremiah 15:18 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

my pain.

Jeremiah 14:19 Have you utterly rejected Judah? has your soul loathed Zion? why have you smitten us, and there is no healing for us?...

Psalm 6:3 My soul is also sore vexed: but you, O LORD, how long?

Psalm 13:1-3 How long will you forget me, O LORD? for ever? how long will you hide your face from me...

Lamentations 3:1-18 I AM the man that has seen affliction by the rod of his wrath...

my wound.

Jeremiah 30:12,15 For thus said the LORD, Your bruise is incurable, and your wound is grievous...

Job 34:6 Should I lie against my right? my wound is incurable without transgression.

Micah 1:9 For her wound is incurable; for it is come to Judah; he is come to the gate of my people, even to Jerusalem.

as a.

Jeremiah 1:18,19 For, behold, I have made you this day a defended city, and an iron pillar, and brazen walls against the whole land...

Jeremiah 20:7 O LORD, you have deceived me, and I was deceived; you are stronger than I, and have prevailed: I am in derision daily...

and as.

Jeremiah 14:3 And their nobles have sent their little ones to the waters: they came to the pits, and found no water...

Job 6:15-20 My brothers have dealt deceitfully as a brook, and as the stream of brooks they pass away...

fail. Heb. be not sure.

Cross References
Job 6:15
My brothers are treacherous as a torrent-bed, as torrential streams that pass away,

Job 6:20
They are ashamed because they were confident; they come there and are disappointed.

Job 34:6
in spite of my right I am counted a liar; my wound is incurable, though I am without transgression.'

Jeremiah 14:3
Her nobles send their servants for water; they come to the cisterns; they find no water; they return with their vessels empty; they are ashamed and confounded and cover their heads.

Jeremiah 30:12
"For thus says the LORD: Your hurt is incurable, and your wound is grievous.

Jeremiah 30:15
Why do you cry out over your hurt? Your pain is incurable. Because your guilt is great, because your sins are flagrant, I have done these things to you.

Micah 1:9
For her wound is incurable, and it has come to Judah; it has reached to the gate of my people, to Jerusalem.

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Altogether Brook Deceitful Deceptive Fail Fails Grievous Healed Hope Incurable Indeed Liar Offering Pain Perpetual Refuses Refuseth Refusing Sorrow Spring Stream Unceasing Unending Unreliable Water Waters Wilt Wound
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