Ecclesiastes 3:5
Parallel Verses
New International Version
a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them, a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,

King James Bible
A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

Darby Bible Translation
A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; A time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

World English Bible
a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

Young's Literal Translation
A time to cast away stones, And a time to heap up stones. A time to embrace, And a time to be far from embracing.

Ecclesiastes 3:5 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

A time to cast away stones, - to gather stones, - to embrace, - to refrain -

"One while domestic cares abortive prove,

And then successful. Nature now invites

Connubial pleasures: but, when languid grown,

No less rejects."

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

to cast

Joshua 4:3-9 And command you them, saying, Take you hence out of the middle of Jordan, out of the place where the priests' feet stood firm...

Joshua 10:27 And it came to pass at the time of the going down of the sun, that Joshua commanded, and they took them down off the trees...

2 Samuel 18:17,18 And they took Absalom, and cast him into a great pit in the wood, and laid a very great heap of stones on him...

2 Kings 3:25 And they beat down the cities, and on every good piece of land cast every man his stone, and filled it...

a time to embrace

Exodus 19:15 And he said to the people, Be ready against the third day: come not at your wives.

1 Samuel 21:4,5 And the priest answered David, and said, There is no common bread under my hand, but there is hallowed bread...

Songs 2:6,7 His left hand is under my head, and his right hand does embrace me...

Joel 2:16 Gather the people, sanctify the congregation, assemble the elders, gather the children, and those that suck the breasts...

1 Corinthians 7:5 Defraud you not one the other, except it be with consent for a time, that you may give yourselves to fasting and prayer...

refrain from

Library
Eternity in the Heart
'He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also He hath set the world in their heart.'--ECCLES. iii. 11. There is considerable difficulty in understanding what precise meaning is to be attached to these words, and what precise bearing they have on the general course of the writer's thoughts; but one or two things are, at any rate, quite clear. The Preacher has been enumerating all the various vicissitudes of prosperity and adversity, of construction and destruction, of society and solitude,
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions of Holy Scripture

But Thou who Both Hast Sons, and Livest in that End of the World...
11. But thou who both hast sons, and livest in that end of the world, wherein now is the time not of casting stones, but of gathering; not of embracing, but of abstaining from embracing; [2244] when the Apostle cries out, "But this I say, brethren, the time is short; it remains, that both they who have wives be as not having;" [2245] assuredly if thou hadst sought a second marriage, it would have been no obedience of prophecy or law, no carnal desire even of family, but a mark of incontinence alone.
St. Augustine—On the Good of Widowhood.

The Holy War,
MADE BY SHADDAI UPON DIABOLUS, FOR THE REGAINING OF THE METROPOLIS OF THE WORLD; OR, THE LOSING AND TAKING AGAIN OF THE TOWN OF MANSOUL. THE AUTHOR OF 'THE PILGRIM'S PROGRESS.' 'I have used similitudes.'--Hosea 12:10. London: Printed for Dorman Newman, at the King's Arms in the Poultry; and Benjamin Alsop, at the Angel and Bible in the Poultry, 1682. ADVERTISEMENT BY THE EDITOR. Bunyan's account of the Holy War is indeed an extraordinary book, manifesting a degree of genius, research, and spiritual
John Bunyan—The Works of John Bunyan Volumes 1-3

A Sermon on Isaiah xxvi. By John Knox.
[In the Prospectus of our Publication it was stated, that one discourse, at least, would be given in each number. A strict adherence to this arrangement, however, it is found, would exclude from our pages some of the most talented discourses of our early Divines; and it is therefore deemed expedient to depart from it as occasion may require. The following Sermon will occupy two numbers, and we hope, that from its intrinsic value, its historical interest, and the illustrious name of its author, it
John Knox—The Pulpit Of The Reformation, Nos. 1, 2 and 3.

Ecclesiastes 3:4
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