Hebrews 4:13
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible
And there is no creature hidden from His sight, but all things are open and laid bare to the eyes of Him with whom we have to do.

King James Bible
Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.

Darby Bible Translation
And there is not a creature unapparent before him; but all things are naked and laid bare to his eyes, with whom we have to do.

World English Bible
There is no creature that is hidden from his sight, but all things are naked and laid open before the eyes of him with whom we have to do.

Young's Literal Translation
and there is not a created thing not manifest before Him, but all things are naked and open to His eyes -- with whom is our reckoning.

Hebrews 4:13 Parallel
Commentary
Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight - There is no being who is not wholly known to God. All his thoughts, feelings, plans, are distinctly understood. Of the truth of this there can be no doubt. The "design" of the remark here is, to guard those to whom the apostle was writing from self-deception - since they could conceal nothing from God.

All things are naked - Exposed; uncovered. There is nothing that can be concealed from God; Psalm 139:11-12.

"The veil of night is no disguise,

No screen from thy all-searching eyes;

Thy hands can seize thy foes as soon.

Thro' midnight shades as blazing noon."

And opened - - τετραχηλισμένα tetrachēlismena. The word used here - Τραχηλίζω Trachēlizō - properly means:

(1) to lay bare the neck, or to bend it back, so as to expose the throat to being cut;

(2) to expose; to lay open in any way.

Why the word is used here has been a matter of inquiry. Some have supposed that the phrase is derived from offering sacrifice, and from the fact that the priest carefully examined the victim to see whether it was sound, before it was offered. But this is manifestly a forced exposition. Others have supposed that it is derived from the custom of bending back the head of a criminal so as to look full in his face, and recognize him so as not to be mistaken; but this is equally forced and unnatural. This opinion was first proposed by Erasmus, and has been adopted by Clarke and others. Bloomfield, following, as he says, the interpretation of Chrysostom, Grotius (though this is not the sentiment of Grotius), Beza, Atling, Hammond, and others, supposes the allusion to be to the custom of cutting the animal down the back bone through the spinal marrow, and thus of laying it open entirely.

This sense would well suit the connection. Grotius supposes that it means to strip off the skin by dividing it at the neck. and then removing it. This view is also adopted substantially by Doddridge. These explanations are forced, and imply a departure more or less from the proper meaning of the Greek word. The most simple and obvious meaning is usually the best in explaining the Bible. The word which the apostle employs relates to "the neck" - τράχηλος trachēlos - and not to the spinal marrow, or the skin. The proper meaning of the verb is "to bend the neck back" so as to expose it in front when an animal is slain - Passow. Then it means to make bare; to remove everything like covering; to expose a thing entirely - as the naked neck is for the knife. The allusion here is undoubtedly to the "sword" which Paul had referred to in the previous verse, as dividing the soul and spirit, and the joints and marrow; and the meaning is, that in the hand of God, who held that sword, everything was exposed.

We are in relation to that, like an animal whose neck is bent back, and laid bare, and ready for the slaughter. Nothing "hinders" God from striking; there is nothing that can prevent that sword from penetrating the heart - any more than when the neck of the animal is bent back and laid bare, there is anything that can hinder the sacrificing priest from thrusting the knife into the throat of the victim. If this be the true interpretation, then what an affecting view does it give of the power of God, and of the exposedness of man to destruction! All is bare, naked, open. There is no concealment; no hindrance; no power of resistance. In a moment God can strike, and his dreadful sentence shall fall on the sinner like the knife on the exposed throat of the victim. What emotions should the sinner have who feels that he is exposed each moment to the sentence of eternal justice - to the sword of God - as the animal with bent-back neck is exposed to the knife! And what solemn feelings should all have who remember that all is naked and open before God! Were we "transparent" so that the world could see all we are, who would dare go abroad?

Who would wish the world to read all his thoughts and feelings for a single day? Who would wish his best friends to look in upon his naked soul as we can look into a room through a window? O what blushes and confusion; what a hanging down of the head, and what an effort to escape from the gaze of people would there be, if every one knew that all his secret feelings were seen by every person whom he met! Social enjoyment would end; and the now frivolous and blithe multitudes in the streets would become processions of downcast and blushing convicts. And yet all these are known to God. He reads every thought; sees every feeling; looks through the whole soul. How careful should we be to keep our hearts pure; how anxious that there should be nothing in the soul that we are not willing to have known!

With whom we have to do - Literally, "with whom is our account." Our account; our reckoning is to be with him before whom all is naked and open. We cannot, therefore, impose on him. We cannot pass off hypocrisy for sincerity. He will judge us according to truth, not according to appearances; and his sentence, therefore, will be just. A man who is to be tried by one "who knows all about him," should be a pure and holy man.

Hebrews 4:13 Parallel Commentaries

Library
April 23. "An High Priest Touched with the Feeling of Our Infirmities" (Heb. Iv. 15).
"An high priest touched with the feeling of our infirmities" (Heb. iv. 15). Some time ago we were talking with a greatly suffering sister about healing, who was much burdened physically and desirous of being able to trust the Lord for deliverance. After a little conversation we prayed with her, committing her case to the Lord for absolute trust and deliverance as she was prepared to claim. As soon as we closed our prayer she grasped our hand, and asked us to unite with her in the burden that was
Rev. A. B. Simpson—Days of Heaven Upon Earth

Heavenly Rest
"My rest," says God: the rest of God! Something more wonderful than any other kind of rest. In my text it is (in the original) called the Sabbatism--not the Sabbath, but the rest of the Sabbath--not the outward ritual of the Sabbath, which was binding upon the Jew, but the inward spirit of the sabbath, which is the joy and delight of the Christian. "There remaineth therefore"--because others have not had it, because some are to have it--"There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God." Now,
Charles Haddon Spurgeon—Spurgeon's Sermons Volume 3: 1857

The Power of God's Word to Convict Men of Sin.
In Hebrews 4:12 we have a Scripture which draws attention to this peculiar characteristic of the Bible--"For the Word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any two edged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, andis a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart." The writings of men may sometimes stir the emotions, search the conscience, and influence the human will, but in a manner and degree possessed by no other book the Bible
Arthur W. Pink—The Divine Inspiration of the Bible

The Great High-Priest.
"Having then a great High-priest, Who hath passed through the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our confession. For we have not a high-priest that cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but One that hath been in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore draw near with boldness unto the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy, and may find grace to help us in time of need. For every high-priest, being taken from among men, is appointed for
Thomas Charles Edwards—The Expositor's Bible: The Epistle to the Hebrews

Cross References
2 Chronicles 16:9
"For the eyes of the LORD move to and fro throughout the earth that He may strongly support those whose heart is completely His. You have acted foolishly in this. Indeed, from now on you will surely have wars."

Job 26:6
"Naked is Sheol before Him, And Abaddon has no covering.

Psalm 33:13
The LORD looks from heaven; He sees all the sons of men;

Psalm 139:4
Even before there is a word on my tongue, Behold, O LORD, You know it all.

Proverbs 5:21
For the ways of a man are before the eyes of the LORD, And He watches all his paths.

Proverbs 15:3
The eyes of the LORD are in every place, Watching the evil and the good.

Jeremiah 16:17
"For My eyes are on all their ways; they are not hidden from My face, nor is their iniquity concealed from My eyes.

Jump to Previous
Able Account Bare Clear Completely Covered Created Creation Creature Escape Exposed Eyes God's Hidden Laid Manifest Naked Open Opened Reckoning Scrutiny Sight Uncovered
Jump to Next
Able Account Bare Clear Completely Covered Created Creation Creature Escape Exposed Eyes God's Hidden Laid Manifest Naked Open Opened Reckoning Scrutiny Sight Uncovered
Links
Hebrews 4:13 NIV
Hebrews 4:13 NLT
Hebrews 4:13 ESV
Hebrews 4:13 NASB
Hebrews 4:13 KJV

Hebrews 4:13 Bible Apps
Hebrews 4:13 Biblia Paralela
Hebrews 4:13 Chinese Bible
Hebrews 4:13 French Bible
Hebrews 4:13 German Bible

Hebrews 4:13 Commentaries

Bible Hub
Hebrews 4:12
Top of Page
Top of Page