Habakkuk 1:1
Parallel Verses
King James Version
The burden which Habakkuk the prophet did see.

Darby Bible Translation
The burden which Habakkuk the prophet did see.

World English Bible
The oracle which Habakkuk the prophet saw.

Young's Literal Translation
The burden that Habakkuk the prophet hath seen:

Habakkuk 1:1 Parallel
Commentary
Geneva Study Bible

The burden which Habakkuk the prophet saw.

The Argument - The Prophet complains to God, considering the great felicity of the wicked, and the miserable oppression of the godly, who endure all types of affliction and cruelty, and yet can see no end. Therefore he had this revelation shown to him by God, that the Chaldeans would come and take them away as captives, so that they could look for no end of their troubles as yet, because of their stubbornness and rebellion against the Lord. And lest the godly should despair, seeing this horrible confusion, he comforts them by this, that God will punish the Chaldeans their enemies, when their pride and cruelty will be at height. And for this reason he exhorts the faithful to patience by his own example, and shows them a form of prayer, with which they should comfort themselves.

Scofield Reference Notes

SCOFIELD REFERENCE NOTES (Old Scofield 1917 Edition)

Book Introduction

The Book of Habakkuk

It seems most probable that Habakkuk prophesied in the latter years of Josiah. Of the prophet himself nothing is known. To him the character of Jehovah was revealed in terms of the highest spirituality. He alone of the prophets was more concerned that the holiness of Jehovah should be vindicated than that Israel should escape chastisement. Written just upon the eve of the captivity, Habakkuk was God's testimony to Himself as against both idolatry and pantheism.

The book is in five parts:

I. Habakkuk's perplexity in view of the sins of Israel and the silence of God, 1.1-4. Historically this was the time of Jehovah's forbearance because of Josiah's repentance (2Ki 22.18-20).

II. The answer of Jehovah to the prophet's perplexity. 1.5-11.

III. The prophet, thus answered, utters the testimony to Jehovah, 1.12-17; but he will watch for further answers, 2.1.

IV. To the watching prophet comes the response of the "vision," 2.20.

V. All ends in Habakkuk's sublime Psalm of the Kingdom.

As a whole the Book of Habakkuk raise and answers the question of God's consistency with Himself in view of permitted evil. The prophet thought that the holiness of God forbade him to go on with evil Israel. The answer of Jehovah announces a Chaldean invasion (Hab 1.6), and a world- wide dispersion Hab 1.5). But Jehovah is not mere wrath; "He delighteth in mercy" (Mic 7:18), and introduces into His answers to the perplexed prophet the great promises, Mic 1.5; 2.3,4,14,20.

Margin burden

See note 1, See Scofield Note: "Isa 13:1".Habakkuk 1:1 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Ahaz
The accession of Ahaz to the throne brought Isaiah and his associates face to face with conditions more appalling than any that had hitherto existed in the realm of Judah. Many who had formerly withstood the seductive influence of idolatrous practices were now being persuaded to take part in the worship of heathen deities. Princes in Israel were proving untrue to their trust; false prophets were arising with messages to lead astray; even some of the priests were teaching for hire. Yet the leaders
Ellen Gould White—The Story of Prophets and Kings

The Holiness of God
The next attribute is God's holiness. Exod 15:51. Glorious in holiness.' Holiness is the most sparkling jewel of his crown; it is the name by which God is known. Psa 111:1. Holy and reverend is his name.' He is the holy One.' Job 6:60. Seraphims cry, Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts, the whole earth is full of his glory.' Isa 6:6. His power makes him mighty, his holiness makes him glorious. God's holiness consists in his perfect love of righteousness, and abhorrence of evil. Of purer eyes than
Thomas Watson—A Body of Divinity

Manasseh and Josiah
The kingdom of Judah, prosperous throughout the times of Hezekiah, was once more brought low during the long years of Manasseh's wicked reign, when paganism was revived, and many of the people were led into idolatry. "Manasseh made Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem to err, and to do worse than the heathen." 2 Chronicles 33:9. The glorious light of former generations was followed by the darkness of superstition and error. Gross evils sprang up and flourished--tyranny, oppression, hatred of all
Ellen Gould White—The Story of Prophets and Kings

Cross References
Isaiah 13:1
The burden of Babylon, which Isaiah the son of Amoz did see.

Jeremiah 23:33
And when this people, or the prophet, or a priest, shall ask thee, saying, What is the burden of the LORD? thou shalt then say unto them, What burden? I will even forsake you, saith the LORD.

Nahum 1:1
The burden of Nineveh. The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite.

Malachi 1:1
The burden of the word of the LORD to Israel by Malachi.

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