2 Kings 3:5
Parallel Verses
King James Version
But it came to pass, when Ahab was dead, that the king of Moab rebelled against the king of Israel.

Darby Bible Translation
And it came to pass when Ahab was dead, that the king of Moab rebelled against the king of Israel.

World English Bible
But it happened, when Ahab was dead, that the king of Moab rebelled against the king of Israel.

Young's Literal Translation
and it cometh to pass at the death of Ahab, that the king of Moab transgresseth against the king of Israel.

2 Kings 3:5 Parallel
Commentary
Geneva Study Bible

But it came to pass, when Ahab was dead, that the king of Moab rebelled against the king of Israel.2 Kings 3:5 Parallel Commentaries

Library
The Old Testament and Archeology
A century ago the student of the world's history found it exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, to paint for himself a clear picture of events antedating B.C. 400. Concerning earlier periods, he was, aside from the Old Testament, practically without records that could claim contemporaneousness with the events recorded. But, one hundred years ago, men had commenced to test every statement, be it historical, or scientific, or theological, by severe canons of criticism, and if it could not stand
Frederick Carl Eiselen—The Christian View of the Old Testament

Balak's Inquiries Relative to the Service of God, and Balaam's Answer, Briefly Considered.
"Wherewith shall I come before the Lord, and bow myself before the high God? Shall I come before him with burnt offerings, with calves of a year old? Will the Lord be pleased with, thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil? Shall I give my first born for my transgression; the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?--He hath shewed thee, 0 man, what is good: And what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?" As mankind are
Andrew Lee et al—Sermons on Various Important Subjects

The Fall of the House of Ahab
[This chapter is based on 1 Kings 21; 2 Kings 1.] The evil influence that Jezebel had exercised from the first over Ahab continued during the later years of his life and bore fruit in deeds of shame and violence such as have seldom been equaled in sacred history. "There was none like unto Ahab, which did sell himself to work wickedness in the sight of the Lord, whom Jezebel his wife stirred up." Naturally of a covetous disposition, Ahab, strengthened and sustained in wrongdoing by Jezebel, had followed
Ellen Gould White—The Story of Prophets and Kings

Kings
The book[1] of Kings is strikingly unlike any modern historical narrative. Its comparative brevity, its curious perspective, and-with some brilliant exceptions--its relative monotony, are obvious to the most cursory perusal, and to understand these things is, in large measure, to understand the book. It covers a period of no less than four centuries. Beginning with the death of David and the accession of Solomon (1 Kings i., ii.) it traverses his reign with considerable fulness (1 Kings iii.-xi.),
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

2 Kings 3:4
Top of Page
Top of Page