Song of Solomon 5:8
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if you find my beloved, that you tell him I am sick with love.

King James Bible
I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.

American Standard Version
I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, If ye find my beloved, That ye tell him, that I am sick from love.

Douay-Rheims Bible
I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if you find my beloved, that you tell him that I languish with love.

English Revised Version
I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.

Webster's Bible Translation
I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick with love.

Song of Solomon 5:8 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

2 I sleep, but my heart keeps waking-

   Hearken! my beloved is knocking:

   Open to me, my sister, my love,

   My dove, my perfect one;

   For my head is filled with dew,

   My locks (are) full of the drops of the night.

The partic. subst. clauses, Sol 5:2, indicate the circumstances under which that which is related in Sol 5:2 occurred. In the principal sentence in hist. prose ויּדפּק would be used; here, in the dramatic vivacity of the description, is found in its stead the interject. vocem equals ausculta with the gen. foll., and a word designating

(Note: דּופק is knocking is not an attribute to the determinate דּודי my beloved which it follows, but a designation of state or condition, and thus acc., as the Beirut translation renders it: "hear my beloved in the condition of one knocking." On the other hand, דוד דופק signifies "a beloved one knocking." But "hear a beloved one knocking" would also be expressed acc. In classical language, the designation of state, if the subst. to which it belongs is indeterminate, is placed before it, e.g., "at the gate stood a beloved one knocking.")

state or condition added, thought of as accus. according to the Semitic syntax (like Genesis 4:10; Jeremiah 10:22; cf. 1 Kings 14:6). To sleep while the heart wakes signifies to dream, for sleep and distinct consciousness cannot be coexistent; the movements of thought either remain in obscurity or are projected as dreams. ער equals ‛awir is formed from עוּר, to be awake (in its root cogn. to the Aryan gar, of like import in γρηγορεῖν, ἐγείρειν), in the same way as מת equals mawith from מוּת. The שׁ has here the conj. sense of "dieweil" (because), like asher in Ecclesiastes 6:12; Ecclesiastes 8:15. The ר dag., which occurs several times elsewhere (vid., under Proverbs 3:8; Proverbs 14:10), is one of the inconsistencies of the system of punctuation, which in other instances does not double the ר; perhaps a relic of the Babylonian idiom, which was herein more accordant with the lingual nature of the r than the Tiberian, which treated it as a semi-guttural. קוצּה, a lock of hair, from קץ equals קיץ, abscdit, follows in the formation of the idea, the analogy of קציר, in the sense of branch, from קצר, desecuit; one so names a part which is removed without injury to the whole, and which presents itself conveniently for removal; cf. the oath sworn by Egyptian women, laḥajât muḳṣu̇si, "by the life of my separated," i.e., "of my locks" (Lane, Egypt, etc., I 38). The word still survives in the Talmud dialect. Of a beautiful young man who proposed to become a Nazarite, Nedarim 9a says the same as the Jer. Horajoth iii. 4 of a man who was a prostitute in Rome: his locks were arranged in separate masses, like heap upon heap; in Bereshith rabba c. lxv., under Genesis 27:11, קוּץ, curly-haired, is placed over against קרח, bald-headed, and the Syr. also has ḳauṣoto as the designation of locks of hair-a word used by the Peshito as the rendering of the Heb. קוצּות, as the Syro-Hexap. Job 16:12, the Greek κόμη. טל, from טלל (Arab. ṭll, to moisten, viz., the ground; to squirt, viz., blood), is in Arabic drizzling rain, in Heb. dew; the drops of the night (רסיסי, from רסס, to sprinkle, to drizzle)

(Note: According to the primary idea: to break that which is solid or fluid into little pieces, wherefore רסיסים means also broken pieces. To this root appertains also the Arab. rashh, to trickle through, to sweat through, II to moisten (e.g., the mouth of a suckling with milk), and the Aethiop. rasěḥa, to be stained. Drops scattered with a sprinkling brush the Arabs call rashaḥât; in the mystical writings, rashaḥât el-uns (dew-drops of intimacy) is the designation of sporadic gracious glances of the deity.)

are just drops of dew, for the precipitation of the damp air assumes this form in nights which are not so cold as to become frosty. Shulamith thus dreams that her beloved seeks admission to her. He comes a long way and at night. In the most tender words he entreats for that which he expects without delay. He addresses her, "my sister," as one of equal rank with himself, and familiar as a sister with a brother; "my love" (רע), as one freely chosen by him to intimate fellowship; "my dove," as beloved and prized by him on account of her purity, simplicity, and loveliness. The meaning of the fourth designation used by him, תּמּתי, is shown by the Arab. tam to be "wholly devoted," whence teim, "one devoted" equals a servant, and mutajjam, desperately in love with one. In addressing her tmty, he thus designates this love as wholly undivided, devoting itself without evasion and without reserve. But on this occasion this love did not approve itself, at least not at once.

Song of Solomon 5:8 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

charge

Songs 2:7 I charge you, O you daughters of Jerusalem, by the roes, and by the hinds of the field, that you stir not up, nor awake my love...

Songs 8:4 I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, that you stir not up, nor awake my love, until he please.

if ye

Romans 15:30 Now I beseech you, brothers, for the Lord Jesus Christ's sake, and for the love of the Spirit...

Galatians 6:1,2 Brothers, if a man be overtaken in a fault, you which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness...

James 5:16 Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that you may be healed...

that ye

Psalm 42:1-3 As the hart pants after the water brooks, so pants my soul after you, O God...

Psalm 63:1-3 O God, you are my God; early will I seek you: my soul thirsts for you, my flesh longs for you in a dry and thirsty land...

Psalm 77:1-3 I cried to God with my voice, even to God with my voice; and he gave ear to me...

Psalm 119:81-83 My soul faints for your salvation: but I hope in your word...

Cross References
Song of Solomon 1:5
I am very dark, but lovely, O daughters of Jerusalem, like the tents of Kedar, like the curtains of Solomon.

Song of Solomon 2:5
Sustain me with raisins; refresh me with apples, for I am sick with love.

Song of Solomon 2:7
I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, by the gazelles or the does of the field, that you not stir up or awaken love until it pleases.

Song of Solomon 3:5
I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, by the gazelles or the does of the field, that you not stir up or awaken love until it pleases.

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