Proverbs 18:1
Parallel Verses
New International Version
An unfriendly person pursues selfish ends and against all sound judgment starts quarrels.

King James Bible
Through desire a man, having separated himself, seeketh and intermeddleth with all wisdom.

Darby Bible Translation
He that separateth himself seeketh [his] pleasure, he is vehement against all sound wisdom.

World English Bible
An unfriendly man pursues selfishness, and defies all sound judgment.

Young's Literal Translation
For an object of desire he who is separated doth seek, With all wisdom he intermeddleth.

Proverbs 18:1 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

Through desire a man, having separated himself - The original is difficult and obscure. The Vulgate, Septuagint, and Arabic, read as follows: "He who wishes to break with his friend, and seeks occasions or pretenses shall at all times be worthy of blame."

My old MS. Bible translates, Occasioun seeketh that wil go awei fro a freend: at al tyme he schal ben wariable.

Coverdale thus: "Who so hath pleasure to sowe discorde, piketh a quarrel in every thinge."

Bible by Barker, 1615: "Fro the desire thereof he will separate himself to seeke it, and occupie himself in all wisdome." Which has in the margin the following note: "He that loveth wisdom will separate himself from all impediments, and give himself wholly to seek it."

The Hebrew: לתאוה יבקש נפרד בכל תושיה יתגלע lethaavah yebakkesh niphrad, bechol tushiyah yithgalla. The nearest translation to the words is perhaps the following: "He who is separated shall seek the desired thing, (i.e., the object of his desire), and shall intermeddle (mingle himself) with all realities or all essential knowledge." He finds that he can make little progress in the investigation of Divine and natural things, if he have much to do with secular or trifliing matters: he therefore separates himself as well from unprofitable pursuits as from frivolous company, and then enters into the spirit of his pursuit; is not satisfied with superficial observances, but examines the substance and essence, as far as possible, of those things which have been the objects of his desire. This appears to me the best meaning: the reader may judge for himself.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

seeketh

Proverbs 2:1-6 My son, if you will receive my words, and hide my commandments with you...

Matthew 13:11,44 He answered and said to them, Because it is given to you to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it is not given...

Mark 4:11 And he said to them, To you it is given to know the mystery of the kingdom of God: but to them that are without...

Ephesians 5:15-17 See then that you walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise...

intermeddleth

Proverbs 14:10 The heart knows his own bitterness; and a stranger does not intermeddle with his joy.

Proverbs 17:14 The beginning of strife is as when one lets out water: therefore leave off contention, before it be meddled with.

Proverbs 20:3,19 It is an honor for a man to cease from strife: but every fool will be meddling...

Proverbs 24:21 My son, fear you the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change:

Proverbs 26:17 He that passes by, and meddles with strife belonging not to him, is like one that takes a dog by the ears.

Isaiah 26:8,9 Yes, in the way of your judgments, O LORD, have we waited for you; the desire of our soul is to your name...

Jeremiah 15:17 I sat not in the assembly of the mockers, nor rejoiced; I sat alone because of your hand: for you have filled me with indignation.

Matthew 22:35 Then one of them, which was a lawyer, asked him a question, tempting him, and saying,

Library
Two Fortresses
'The name of the Lord is a strong tower: the righteous runneth into it, and is safe. 11. The rich man's wealth is his strong city, and as an high wall in his own conceit'--PROVERBS xviii. 10,11. The mere reading of these two verses shows that, contrary to the usual rule in the Book of Proverbs, they have a bearing on each other. They are intended to suggest a very strong contrast, and that contrast is even more emphatic in the original than in our translation; because, as the margin of your Bibles
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions of Holy Scripture

The Cause and Cure of a Wounded Spirit
A sermon (2494) intended for reading on Lord's Day, December 6th, 1896, delivered by C. H. Spurgeon at the Metropolitan Tabernacle, Newington on Thursday Evening, April 16th, 1885. "The spirit of a man will sustain his infirmity; but a wounded spirit who can bear?"--Proverbs 18:14. Every man sooner or later has some kind of infirmity to bear. It may be that his constitution from the very first will be inclined to certain disease and pains, or possibly he may in passing through life suffer from accident
C.H. Spurgeon—Sermons on Proverbs

"And if Christ be in You, the Body is Dead Because of Sin: but the Spirit is Life Because of Righteousness. "
Rom. viii. 10.--"And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin: but the Spirit is life because of righteousness." "The sting of death is sin, and the strength of sin is the law," saith our apostle, 1 Cor. xv. 56. These two concur to make man mortal, and these two are the bitter ingredients of death. Sin procured it, and the law appointed it, and God hath seen to the exact execution of that law in all ages; for what man liveth and shall not taste of death? Two only escaped the common
Hugh Binning—The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning

Commerce
The remarkable change which we have noticed in the views of Jewish authorities, from contempt to almost affectation of manual labour, could certainly not have been arbitrary. But as we fail to discover here any religious motive, we can only account for it on the score of altered political and social circumstances. So long as the people were, at least nominally, independent, and in possession of their own land, constant engagement in a trade would probably mark an inferior social stage, and imply
Alfred Edersheim—Sketches of Jewish Social Life

Proverbs 17:28
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