Proverbs 13:3
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Those who guard their lips preserve their lives, but those who speak rashly will come to ruin.

King James Bible
He that keepeth his mouth keepeth his life: but he that openeth wide his lips shall have destruction.

Darby Bible Translation
He that guardeth his mouth keepeth his soul; destruction shall be to him that openeth wide his lips.

World English Bible
He who guards his mouth guards his soul. One who opens wide his lips comes to ruin.

Young's Literal Translation
Whoso is keeping his mouth, is keeping his soul, Whoso is opening wide his lips -- ruin to him!

Proverbs 13:3 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

He that keepeth his mouth keepeth his life - How often have the foolish, headstrong, and wicked, forfeited their lives by the treasonable or blasphemous words they have spoken! The government of the tongue is a rare but useful talent.

But he that openeth wide his lips - He that puts no bounds to his loquacity, speaks on every subject, and gives his judgment and opinion on every matter. It has often been remarked that God has, given us two Eyes, that we may See much; two Ears, that we may Hear much; but has given us but One tongue, and that fenced in with teeth, to indicate that though we hear and see much, we should speak but little.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

0:19

Proverbs 12:13 The wicked is snared by the transgression of his lips: but the just shall come out of trouble.

Proverbs 21:23 Whoever keeps his mouth and his tongue keeps his soul from troubles.

Psalm 39:1 I said, I will take heed to my ways, that I sin not with my tongue: I will keep my mouth with a bridle, while the wicked is before me.

Matthew 12:36,37 But I say to you, That every idle word that men shall speak, they shall give account thereof in the day of judgment...

James 1:26 If any man among you seem to be religious, and bridles not his tongue, but deceives his own heart, this man's religion is vain.

James 3:2-12 For in many things we offend all. If any man offend not in word, the same is a perfect man, and able also to bridle the whole body...

Library
The Tillage of the Poor
'Much food is in the tillage of the poor.'--PROVERBS xiii. 23. Palestine was a land of small peasant proprietors, and the institution of the Jubilee was intended to prevent the acquisition of large estates by any Israelite. The consequence, as intended, was a level of modest prosperity. It was 'the tillage of the poor,' the careful, diligent husbandry of the man who had only a little patch of land to look after, that filled the storehouses of the Holy Land. Hence the proverb of our text arose. It
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions of Holy Scripture

The Song of the Redeemed
And they sung a new song, saying, Thou ... hast redeemed us to God by Thy blood, out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation ... T he extent, variety, and order of the creation, proclaim the glory of God. He is likewise, ^* Maximus in Minimis . The smallest of the works, that we are capable of examining, such for instance as the eye or the wing of a little insect, the creature of a day, are stamped with an inimitable impression of His wisdom and power. Thus in His written Word, there
John Newton—Messiah Vol. 2

Blessed are the Poor in Spirit
Having spoken of the general notion of blessedness, I come next to consider the subjects of this blessedness, and these our Saviour has deciphered to be the poor in spirit, the mourners, etc. But before I touch upon these, I shall attempt a little preface or paraphrase upon this sermon of the beatitudes. 1 Observe the divinity in this sermon, which goes beyond all philosophy. The philosophers use to say that one contrary expels another; but here one contrary begets another. Poverty is wont to expel
Thomas Watson—The Beatitudes: An Exposition of Matthew 5:1-12

Proverbs
Many specimens of the so-called Wisdom Literature are preserved for us in the book of Proverbs, for its contents are by no means confined to what we call proverbs. The first nine chapters constitute a continuous discourse, almost in the manner of a sermon; and of the last two chapters, ch. xxx. is largely made up of enigmas, and xxxi. is in part a description of the good housewife. All, however, are rightly subsumed under the idea of wisdom, which to the Hebrew had always moral relations. The Hebrew
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Cross References
James 3:2
We all stumble in many ways. Anyone who is never at fault in what they say is perfect, able to keep their whole body in check.

Psalm 34:13
keep your tongue from evil and your lips from telling lies.

Psalm 141:3
Set a guard over my mouth, LORD; keep watch over the door of my lips.

Proverbs 10:14
The wise store up knowledge, but the mouth of a fool invites ruin.

Proverbs 13:4
A sluggard's appetite is never filled, but the desires of the diligent are fully satisfied.

Proverbs 18:7
The mouths of fools are their undoing, and their lips are a snare to their very lives.

Proverbs 18:21
The tongue has the power of life and death, and those who love it will eat its fruit.

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