Proverbs 13:15
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Good judgment wins favor, but the way of the unfaithful leads to their destruction.

King James Bible
Good understanding giveth favour: but the way of transgressors is hard.

Darby Bible Translation
Good understanding procureth favour; but the way of the treacherous is hard.

World English Bible
Good understanding wins favor; but the way of the unfaithful is hard.

Young's Literal Translation
Good understanding giveth grace, And the way of the treacherous is hard.

Proverbs 13:15 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

The law of the wise is a fountain of life - Perhaps it would be better to translate, "The law is to the wise man a fountain of life." It is the same to him as the "vein of lives," מקור חיים mekor chaiyim, the great aorta which transmits the blood from the heart to every part of the body. There seems to be here an allusion to the garden of paradise, to the tree of lives, to the tempter, to the baleful issue of that temptation, and to the death entailed on man by his unwisely breaking the law of his God.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

good

Proverbs 3:4 So shall you find favor and good understanding in the sight of God and man.

Proverbs 14:35 The king's favor is toward a wise servant: but his wrath is against him that causes shame.

1 Samuel 18:14-16 And David behaved himself wisely in all his ways; and the LORD was with him...

Luke 2:52 And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man.

Acts 7:10 And delivered him out of all his afflictions, and gave him favor and wisdom in the sight of Pharaoh king of Egypt...

but

Proverbs 4:19 The way of the wicked is as darkness: they know not at what they stumble.

Proverbs 15:10 Correction is grievous to him that forsakes the way: and he that hates reproof shall die.

Psalm 95:9-11 When your fathers tempted me, proved me, and saw my work...

Jeremiah 2:19 Your own wickedness shall correct you, and your backslidings shall reprove you...

Romans 6:21 What fruit had you then in those things whereof you are now ashamed? for the end of those things is death.

Library
The Tillage of the Poor
'Much food is in the tillage of the poor.'--PROVERBS xiii. 23. Palestine was a land of small peasant proprietors, and the institution of the Jubilee was intended to prevent the acquisition of large estates by any Israelite. The consequence, as intended, was a level of modest prosperity. It was 'the tillage of the poor,' the careful, diligent husbandry of the man who had only a little patch of land to look after, that filled the storehouses of the Holy Land. Hence the proverb of our text arose. It
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions of Holy Scripture

The Song of the Redeemed
And they sung a new song, saying, Thou ... hast redeemed us to God by Thy blood, out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation ... T he extent, variety, and order of the creation, proclaim the glory of God. He is likewise, ^* Maximus in Minimis . The smallest of the works, that we are capable of examining, such for instance as the eye or the wing of a little insect, the creature of a day, are stamped with an inimitable impression of His wisdom and power. Thus in His written Word, there
John Newton—Messiah Vol. 2

Blessed are the Poor in Spirit
Having spoken of the general notion of blessedness, I come next to consider the subjects of this blessedness, and these our Saviour has deciphered to be the poor in spirit, the mourners, etc. But before I touch upon these, I shall attempt a little preface or paraphrase upon this sermon of the beatitudes. 1 Observe the divinity in this sermon, which goes beyond all philosophy. The philosophers use to say that one contrary expels another; but here one contrary begets another. Poverty is wont to expel
Thomas Watson—The Beatitudes: An Exposition of Matthew 5:1-12

Proverbs
Many specimens of the so-called Wisdom Literature are preserved for us in the book of Proverbs, for its contents are by no means confined to what we call proverbs. The first nine chapters constitute a continuous discourse, almost in the manner of a sermon; and of the last two chapters, ch. xxx. is largely made up of enigmas, and xxxi. is in part a description of the good housewife. All, however, are rightly subsumed under the idea of wisdom, which to the Hebrew had always moral relations. The Hebrew
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Proverbs 13:14
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