Judges 1:17
Parallel Verses
New International Version
Then the men of Judah went with the Simeonites their fellow Israelites and attacked the Canaanites living in Zephath, and they totally destroyed the city. Therefore it was called Hormah.

King James Bible
And Judah went with Simeon his brother, and they slew the Canaanites that inhabited Zephath, and utterly destroyed it. And the name of the city was called Hormah.

Darby Bible Translation
And Judah went with Simeon his brother, and they slew the Canaanites that inhabited Zephath, and utterly destroyed it; and they called the name of the city Hormah.

World English Bible
Judah went with Simeon his brother, and they struck the Canaanites who inhabited Zephath, and utterly destroyed it. The name of the city was called Hormah.

Young's Literal Translation
And Judah goeth with Simeon his brother, and they smite the Canaanite inhabiting Zephath, and devote it; and one calleth the name of the city Hormah.

Judges 1:17 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

The city was called Hormah - This appears to be the same transaction mentioned Numbers 21:1 (note), etc., where see the notes.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Judah

Judges 1:3 And Judah said to Simeon his brother, Come up with me into my lot, that we may fight against the Canaanites...

Zephath

2 Chronicles 14:10 Then Asa went out against him, and they set the battle in array in the valley of Zephathah at Mareshah.

Hormah

Numbers 14:45 Then the Amalekites came down, and the Canaanites which dwelled in that hill, and smote them, and discomfited them, even to Hormah.

Numbers 21:3 And the LORD listened to the voice of Israel, and delivered up the Canaanites; and they utterly destroyed them and their cities...

Joshua 19:4 And Eltolad, and Bethul, and Hormah,

Library
The Historical Books.
1. In the Pentateuch we have the establishment of the Theocracy, with the preparatory and accompanying history pertaining to it. The province of the historical books is to unfold its practiced working, and to show how, under the divine superintendence and guidance, it accomplished the end for which it was given. They contain, therefore, primarily, a history of God's dealings with the covenant people under the economy which he had imposed upon them. They look at the course of human events on the
E. P. Barrows—Companion to the Bible

Tsippor
"Tsippor is the greatest city of Galilee, and built in a very strong place." "Kitron (Judg 1:29,30) is Tsippor: and why is it called Tsippor? Because it is seated upon a mountain as Tsippor, a bird." "Sixteen miles on all sides from Tsippor was a land flowing with milk and honey." This city is noted in Josephus for its warlike affairs; but most noted in the Talmudists for the university fixed there, and for the learning, which Rabbi Judah the Holy brought hither, as we have said before. He sat in
John Lightfoot—From the Talmud and Hebraica

Judges
For the understanding of the early history and religion of Israel, the book of Judges, which covers the period from the death of Joshua to the beginning of the struggle with the Philistines, is of inestimable importance; and it is very fortunate that the elements contributed by the later editors are so easily separated from the ancient stories whose moral they seek to point. That moral is most elaborately stated in ii. 6-iii. 6, which is a sort of programme or preface to iii. 7-xvi. 31, which constitutes
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Judges 1:16
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