Genesis 10:30
Parallel Verses
New International Version
The region where they lived stretched from Mesha toward Sephar, in the eastern hill country.

King James Bible
And their dwelling was from Mesha, as thou goest unto Sephar a mount of the east.

Darby Bible Translation
And their dwelling was from Mesha, as one goes to Sephar, the eastern mountain.

World English Bible
Their dwelling was from Mesha, as you go toward Sephar, the mountain of the east.

Young's Literal Translation
and their dwelling is from Mesha, in thy coming towards Sephar, a mount of the east.

Genesis 10:30 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

Joktan - He had thirteen sons who had their dwelling from Mesha unto Sephar, a mount of the east, which places Calmet supposes to be mount Masius, on the west in Mesopotamia, and the mountains of the Saphirs on the east in Armenia, or of the Tapyrs farther on in Media. In confirmation that all men have been derived from one family, let it be observed that there are many customs and usages, both sacred and civil, which have prevailed in all parts of the world; and that these could owe their origin to nothing but a general institution, which could never have existed, had not mankind been originally of the same blood, and instructed in the same common notions before they were dispersed. Among these usages may be reckoned,

1. The numbering by tens.

2. Their computing time by a cycle of seven days.

3. Their setting apart the seventh day for religious purposes.

4. Their use of sacrifices, propitiatory and eucharistical.

5. The consecration of temples and altars.

6. The institution of sanctuaries or places of refuge, and their privileges.

7. Their giving a tenth part of the produce of their fields, etc., for the use of the altar.

8. The custom of worshipping the Deity bare-footed.

9. Abstinence of the men from all sensual gratifications previously to their offering sacrifice.

10. The order of priesthood and its support.

11. The notion of legal pollutions, defilements, etc.

12. The universal tradition of a general deluge.

13. The universal opinion that the rainbow was a Divine sign, or portent, etc., etc.

continued...

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

mount of the east.

Numbers 23:7 And he took up his parable, and said, Balak the king of Moab has brought me from Aram, out of the mountains of the east, saying, Come...

Library
Ancient Chaldaea
The Creation, the Deluge, the history of the gods--The country, its cities its inhabitants, its early dynasties. [Illustration: 002a.jpg] "In the time when nothing which was called heaven existed above, and when nothing below had as yet received the name of earth,* Apsu, the Ocean, who first was their father, and Chaos-Tiamat, who gave birth to them all, mingled their waters in one, reeds which were not united, rushes which bore no fruit."** Life germinated slowly in this inert mass, in which the
G. Maspero—History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, V 3

The Sea of Sodom
The bounds of Judea, on both sides, are the sea; the western bound is the Mediterranean,--the eastern, the Dead sea, or the sea of Sodom. This the Jewish writers every where call, which you may not so properly interpret here, "the salt sea," as "the bituminous sea." In which sense word for word, "Sodom's salt," but properly "Sodom's bitumen," doth very frequently occur among them. The use of it was in the holy incense. They mingled 'bitumen,' 'the amber of Jordan,' and [an herb known to few], with
John Lightfoot—From the Talmud and Hebraica

The Blessings of Noah Upon Shem and Japheth. (Gen. Ix. 18-27. )
Ver. 20. "And Noah began and became an husbandman, and planted vineyards."--This does not imply that Noah was the first who began to till the ground, and, more especially, to cultivate the vine; for Cain, too, was a tiller of the ground, Gen. iv. 2. The sense rather is, that Noah, after the flood, again took up this calling. Moreover, the remark has not an independent import; it serves only to prepare the way for the communication of the subsequent account of Noah's drunkenness. By this remark,
Ernst Wilhelm Hengstenberg—Christology of the Old Testament

Influences that Gave Rise to the Priestly Laws and Histories
[Sidenote: Influences in the exile that produced written ceremonial laws] The Babylonian exile gave a great opportunity and incentive to the further development of written law. While the temple stood, the ceremonial rites and customs received constant illustration, and were transmitted directly from father to son in the priestly families. Hence, there was little need of writing them down. But when most of the priests were carried captive to Babylonia, as in 597 B.C., and ten years later the temple
Charles Foster Kent—The Origin & Permanent Value of the Old Testament

Genesis 10:29
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