Hebrews 10:7
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible
"THEN I SAID, 'BEHOLD, I HAVE COME (IN THE SCROLL OF THE BOOK IT IS WRITTEN OF ME) TO DO YOUR WILL, O GOD.'"

King James Bible
Then said I, Lo, I come (in the volume of the book it is written of me,) to do thy will, O God.

Darby Bible Translation
Then I said, Lo, I come (in the roll of the book it is written of me) to do, O God, thy will.

World English Bible
Then I said, 'Behold, I have come (in the scroll of the book it is written of me) to do your will, O God.'"

Young's Literal Translation
then I said, Lo, I come, (in a volume of the book it hath been written concerning me,) to do, O God, Thy will;'

Hebrews 10:7 Parallel
Commentary
Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Then said I-- "I the Messiah." Paul applies this directly to Christ, showing that he regarded the passage in the Psalms as referring to him as the speaker.

Lo, I come - Come into the world; Hebrews 10:5. It is not easy to see how this could be applied to David in any circumstance of his life. There was no situation in which he could say that, since sacrifices and offerings were not what was demanded, he came to do the will of God in the place or stead of them. The time here referred to by the word "then" is when it was manifest that sacrifices and offerings for sin would not answer all the purposes desirable, or when in view of that fact the purpose of the Redeemer is conceived as formed to enter upon a work which would effect what they could not.

In the volume of the book it is written of me - The word rendered here "volume " - κεφαλίς kephalis - means properly "a little head;" and then a knob, and here refers doubtless to the head or knob of the rod on which the Hebrew manuscripts were rolled. Books were usually so written as to be rolled up, and when they were read they were unrolled at one end of the manuscript, and rolled up at the other as fast as they were read; see notes on Luke 4:17. The rods on which they were rolled had small heads, either for the purpose of holding them, or for ornament, and hence, the name head came metaphorically to be given to the roll or volume. But what volume is here intended? And where is that written which is here referred to? If David was the author of the Psalm from which this is quoted Psalm 40, then the book or volume which was then in existence must have been principally, if not entirely, the five books of Moses, and perhaps the books of Job, Joshua, and Judges, with probably a few of the Psalms. It is most natural to understand this of the Pentateuch, or the five books of Moses, as the word "volume" at that time would undoubtedly have most naturally suggested that.

But plainly, this could not refer to David himself, for in what part of the Law of Moses, or in any of the volumes then extant, can a reference of this kind be found to David? There is no promise, no intimation that he would come to "do the will of God" with a view to effect what could not be done by the sacrifices prescribed by the Jewish Law. The reference of the language, therefore, must be to the Messiah - to some place where it is represented that he would come to effect by his obedience what could not be done by the sacrifices and offerings under the Law. But still, in the books of Moses, this language is not literally found, and the meaning must be, that this was the language which was there implied respecting the Messiah; or this was the substance of the description given of him, that he would como to take the place of those sacrifices, and by his obedience unto death would accomplish what they could not do.

They had a reference to him; and it was contemplated in their appointment that their inefficiency would be such that there should be felt a necessity for a higher sacrifice, and when he should come they would all be done away. The whole language of the institution of sacrifices, and of the Mosaic economy, was, that a Saviour would hereafter come to do the will of God in making an atonement for the sin of the world. That there are places in the books of Moses which refer to the Saviour, is expressly affirmed by Christ himself John 5:46, and by the apostles (compare Acts 26:22, Acts 26:3), and that the general spirit of the institutions of Moses had reference to him is abundantly demonstrated in this Epistle. The meaning here is, "I come to do thy will in making an atonement, for no other offering would expiate sin. That I would do this is the language of the Scriptures which predict my coming, and of the whole spirit and design of the ancient dispensation."

To do thy will, O God - This expresses the amount of all that the Redeemer came to do. He came to do the will of God:

(1) by perfect obedience to his Law, and,

(2) by making an atonement for sin - becoming "obedient unto death;" Philippians 2:8.

The latter is the principal thought here, for the apostle is showing that sacrifice and offering such as were made under the Law would not put away sin, and that Christ came in contradistinction from them to make a sacrifice that would be efficacious. Everywhere in the Scriptures it is held out as being the "will of God" that such an atonement should be made. There was salvation in no other way, nor was it possible that the race should be saved unless the Redeemer drank that cup of bitter sorrows; see Matthew 26:39. We are not to suppose, however, that it was by mere arbitrary will that those sufferings were demanded. There were good reasons for all that the Saviour was to endure, though those reasons are not all made known to us.

Hebrews 10:7 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Twenty-Sixth Day. Holiness and the Will of God.
This is the will of God, even your sanctification.'--1 Thess. iv. 3. 'Lo, I am come to do Thy will. By which will we have been sanctified, through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.'--Heb. x. 9, 10. In the will of God we have the union of His Wisdom and Power. The Wisdom decides and declares what is to be: the Power secures the performance. The declarative will is only one side; its complement, the executive will, is the living energy in which everything good has its
Andrew Murray—Holy in Christ

The Death of the Saviour the End of all Sacrifices.
(Good Friday.) TEXT: HEB. x. 8-12. DEEPLY as our feelings may be moved on a day such as this, deeply as our hearts may be affected with a sense of sin, and at the same time filled with thankfulness for the mercy from on high, that planned to save us by God not sparing His own Son, we can only be sure of having found the right and true use of the day, when we bring our thoughts and feelings to the test of Scripture. We find there a twofold treatment of the supremely important event which we commemorate
Friedrich Schleiermacher—Selected Sermons of Schleiermacher

The Roman Conflagration and the Neronian Persecution.
"And I saw the woman drunken with the blood of the saints, and with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus. And when I saw her, I wondered with a great wonder."--Apoc. 17:6. Literature. I. Tacitus: Annales, 1. XV., c. 38-44. Suetonius: Nero, chs. 16 and 38 (very brief). Sulpicius Severus: Hist. Sacra, 1. II., c. 41. He gives to the Neronian persecution a more general character. II. Ernest Renan: L'Antechrist. Paris, deuxième ed., 1873. Chs. VI. VIII, pp. 123 sqq. Also his Hibbert Lectures, delivered
Philip Schaff—History of the Christian Church, Volume I

Brought Nigh
W. R. Heb. x. 19 No more veil! God bids me enter By the new and living way-- Not in trembling hope I venture, Boldly I His call obey; There, with Him, my God, I meet God upon the mercy-seat! In the robes of spotless whiteness, With the Blood of priceless worth, He has gone into that brightness, Christ rejected from the earth-- Christ accepted there on high, And in Him do I draw nigh. Oh the welcome I have found there, God in all His love made known! Oh the glory that surrounds there Those accepted
Frances Bevan—Hymns of Ter Steegen, Suso, and Others

Cross References
Ezra 6:2
In Ecbatana in the fortress, which is in the province of Media, a scroll was found and there was written in it as follows: "Memorandum--

Psalm 40:7
Then I said, "Behold, I come; In the scroll of the book it is written of me.

Psalm 40:8
I delight to do Your will, O my God; Your Law is within my heart."

Isaiah 50:5
The Lord GOD has opened My ear; And I was not disobedient Nor did I turn back.

Jeremiah 36:2
"Take a scroll and write on it all the words which I have spoken to you concerning Israel and concerning Judah, and concerning all the nations, from the day I first spoke to you, from the days of Josiah, even to this day.

Ezekiel 2:9
Then I looked, and behold, a hand was extended to me; and lo, a scroll was in it.

Ezekiel 3:1
Then He said to me, "Son of man, eat what you find; eat this scroll, and go, speak to the house of Israel."

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