2 Corinthians 3:5
Parallel Verses
New American Standard Bible
Not that we are adequate in ourselves to consider anything as coming from ourselves, but our adequacy is from God,

King James Bible
Not that we are sufficient of ourselves to think any thing as of ourselves; but our sufficiency is of God;

Darby Bible Translation
not that we are competent of ourselves to think anything as of ourselves, but our competency is of God;

World English Bible
not that we are sufficient of ourselves, to account anything as from ourselves; but our sufficiency is from God;

Young's Literal Translation
not that we are sufficient of ourselves to think anything, as of ourselves, but our sufficiency is of God,

2 Corinthians 3:5 Parallel
Commentary
Barnes' Notes on the Bible

Not that we are sufficient of ourselves - This is evidently designed to guard against the appearance of boasting, or of self-confidence. He had spoken of his confidence; of his triumph; of his success; of his undoubted evidence that God had sent him. He here says, that he did not mean to be understood as affirming that any of his success came from himself, or that he was able by his own strength to accomplish the great things which had been effected by his ministry. He well knew that he had no such self-sufficiency; and he would not insinuate, in the slightest manner, that he believed himself to be invested with any such power, compare note on John 15:5.

To think anything - (λογίσασθαι τι logisasthai ti). The word used here means properly to reason, think, consider; and then to reckon, count to, or impute to anyone. It is the word which is commonly rendered impute; see it explained more fully in the note on Romans 4:5. Robinson (Lexicon) renders it in this place, "to reason out, to think out, to find out by thinking." Doddridge renders it, "to reckon upon anything as from ourselves." Whitby renders it, "to reason; as if the apostle had said, We are unable by any reasoning of our own to bring people to conversion. Macknight gives a similar sense. Locke renders it, "Not as if I were sufficient of myself, to reckon upon anything as from myself:" and explains it to mean that Paul was not sufficient of himself by any strength of natural parts to attain the knowledge of the gospel truths which he preached. The word may be rendered here, to reckon, reason, think, etc.; but it should be confined to the immediate subject under consideration. It does not refer to thinking in general; or to the power of thought on any, and on all subjects - however true it may be in itself but to the preaching the gospel. And the expression may be regarded as referring to the following points, which are immediately under discussion:

(1) Paul did not feel that he was sufficient of himself to have reasoned or thought out the truths of the gospel. They were communicated by God.

(2) he had no power by reasoning to convince or convert sinners. That was all of God.

(3) he had no right to reckon on success by any strength of his own. All success was to be traced to God. It is, however, also true, that all our powers of thinking and reasoning are from God; and that we have no ability to think clearly, to reason calmly, closely, and correctly, unless he shall preside over our minds and give us clearness of thought. How easy is it for God to disarrange all our faculties, and produce insanity! How easy to suffer our minds to become unsettled, bewildered, and distracted with a multiplicity of thoughts! How easy to cause every thing to appear cloudy, and dark, and misty! How easy to affect our bodies with weakness, langor, disease, and through them to destroy all power of close and consecutive thought! No one who considers on how many things the power of close thinking depends, can doubt that all our sufficiency in this is from God; and that we owe to him every clear idea on the subjects of common life, and on scientific subjects, no less certainly than we do in the truths of religion, compare the case of Bezaleel and Aholiab in common arts, Exodus 31:1-6, and Job 32:8.

2 Corinthians 3:5 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Spiritual Liberty
Liberty is the heirloom of all the sons and daughters of Adam. But where do you find liberty unaccompanied by religion? True it is that all men have a right to liberty, but it is equally true that you do not meet it in any country save where you find the Spirit of the Lord. "Where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty." Thank God, this is a free country. This is a land where I can breathe the air and say it is untainted by the groan of a single slave; my lungs receive it, and I know there has
Charles Haddon Spurgeon—Spurgeon's Sermons Volume 1: 1855

How to Become Like Christ.
"But we all, with unveiled face reflecting as a mirror the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord."--2 COR. iii. 18 (Revised Version). I suppose there is almost no one who would deny, if it were put to him, that the greatest possible attainment a man can make in this world is likeness to The Lord Jesus Christ. Certainly no one would deny that there is nothing but character that we can carry out of life with us, and that our prospect
Marcus Dods—How to become like Christ

The Two Covenants: the Transition
"Now the God of peace, who brought again from the dead the great Shepherd of the sheep, in the blood of the everlasting covenant, even our Lord Jesus, make you perfect in every good thing to do His will, working in us that which is well-pleasing in His sight, through Jesus Christ."--HEB. xiii. 20, 21. THE transition from the Old Covenant to the New was not slow or gradual, but by a tremendous crisis. Nothing less than the death of Christ was the close of the Old. Nothing less than His resurrection
Andrew Murray—The Two Covenants

The Image of God in Man.
"As we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly."--1 Cor. xv. 49. One more point remains to be discussed, viz., whether the divine image refers to the image of Christ. This singular opinion has found many warm defenders in the Church from the beginning. It originated with Origen, who with his brilliant, fascinating, and seducing heresies has unsettled many things in the Church; and his heresy in this respect has found many defenders both East and West. Even
Abraham Kuyper—The Work of the Holy Spirit

Cross References
Genesis 41:16
Joseph then answered Pharaoh, saying, "It is not in me; God will give Pharaoh a favorable answer."

2 Chronicles 30:12
The hand of God was also on Judah to give them one heart to do what the king and the princes commanded by the word of the LORD.

Romans 15:18
For I will not presume to speak of anything except what Christ has accomplished through me, resulting in the obedience of the Gentiles by word and deed,

1 Corinthians 15:10
But by the grace of God I am what I am, and His grace toward me did not prove vain; but I labored even more than all of them, yet not I, but the grace of God with me.

2 Corinthians 2:16
to the one an aroma from death to death, to the other an aroma from life to life. And who is adequate for these things?

2 Timothy 2:2
The things which you have heard from me in the presence of many witnesses, entrust these to faithful men who will be able to teach others also.

Jump to Previous
Able Account Adequate Claim Competent Consider Credit Decide Ourselves Power Reasonings Sufficiency Sufficient Think
Jump to Next
Able Account Adequate Claim Competent Consider Credit Decide Ourselves Power Reasonings Sufficiency Sufficient Think
Links
2 Corinthians 3:5 NIV
2 Corinthians 3:5 NLT
2 Corinthians 3:5 ESV
2 Corinthians 3:5 NASB
2 Corinthians 3:5 KJV

2 Corinthians 3:5 Bible Apps
2 Corinthians 3:5 Biblia Paralela
2 Corinthians 3:5 Chinese Bible
2 Corinthians 3:5 French Bible
2 Corinthians 3:5 German Bible

2 Corinthians 3:5 Commentaries

Bible Hub
2 Corinthians 3:4
Top of Page
Top of Page