Job 26:6
Parallel Verses
King James Version
Hell is naked before him, and destruction hath no covering.

Darby Bible Translation
Sheol is naked before him, and destruction hath no covering.

World English Bible
Sheol is naked before God, and Abaddon has no covering.

Young's Literal Translation
Naked is Sheol over-against Him, And there is no covering to destruction.

Job 26:6 Parallel
Commentary
Geneva Study Bible

Hell is {e} naked before him, and {f} destruction hath no covering.

(e) There is nothing hidden in the bottom of the earth but he sees it.

(f) Meaning, the grave in which things putrify.

Scofield Reference Notes

Margin hell

Heb. "Sheol," See Scofield Note: "Hab 2:5". Also, Ps 139:8,11 Prov 15:11 Heb 4:13.Job 26:6 Parallel Commentaries

Library
Whether Fear Remains in Heaven
Whether Fear Remains in Heaven We proceed to the eleventh article thus: 1. It seems that fear does not remain in heaven. For it is said in Prov. 1:33: " . . . shall dwell safely, and shall be quiet from fear of evil," and this is to be understood as referring to those who already enjoy wisdom in eternal blessedness. Now all fear is fear of evil, since evil is the object of fear, as was said in Arts. 2 and 5, and in 12ae, Q. 42, Art. 1. There will therefore be no fear in heaven. 2. Again, in heaven
Aquinas—Nature and Grace

Whether the virtues of Heaven Will be Moved when Our Lord Shall Come?
Objection 1: It would seem that the virtues of heaven will not be moved when our Lord shall come. For the virtues of heaven can de. note only the blessed angels. Now immobility is essential to blessedness. Therefore it will be impossible for them to be moved. Objection 2: Further, ignorance is the cause of wonder (Metaph. i, 2). Now ignorance, like fear, is far from the angels, for as Gregory says (Dial. iv, 33; Moral. ii, 3), "what do they not see, who see Him Who sees all." Therefore it will be
Saint Thomas Aquinas—Summa Theologica

Whether Wisdom is the Greatest of the Intellectual virtues?
Objection 1: It would seem that wisdom is not the greatest of the intellectual virtues. Because the commander is greater than the one commanded. Now prudence seems to command wisdom, for it is stated in Ethic. i, 2 that political science, which belongs to prudence (Ethic. vi, 8), "orders that sciences should be cultivated in states, and to which of these each individual should devote himself, and to what extent." Since, then, wisdom is one of the sciences, it seems that prudence is greater than wisdom.
Saint Thomas Aquinas—Summa Theologica

The Host of Heaven and of Earth.
"The Spirit of God hath made me."--Job xxxiii. 4. Understanding somewhat the characteristic note of the work of the Holy Spirit, let us see what this work was and is and shall be. The Father brings forth, the Son disposes and arranges, the Holy Spirit perfects. There is one God and Father of whom are all things, and one Lord Jesus Christ through whom are all things; but what does the Scripture say of the special work the Holy Spirit did in creation and is still doing? For the sake of order we examine
Abraham Kuyper—The Work of the Holy Spirit

God Incomprehensible and Sovereign.
1 Can creatures to perfection find [1] Th' eternal uncreated mind? Or can the largest stretch of thought Measure and search his nature out? 2 'Tis high as heaven, 'tis deep as hell, And what can mortals know or tell? His glory spreads beyond the sky, And all the shining worlds on high. 3 But man, vain man, would fain be wise, Born like a wild young colt he flies Thro' all the follies of his mind, And swells and snuffs the empty wind. 4 God is a King of power unknown, Firm are the orders of his throne;
Isaac Watts—Hymns and Spiritual Songs

Christian Perfection
"Not as though I had already attained, either were already perfect." Phil. 3:12. 1. There is scarce any expression in Holy Writ which has given more offence than this. The word perfect is what many cannot bear. The very sound of it is an abomination to them. And whosoever preaches perfection (as the phrase is,) that is, asserts that it is attainable in this life, runs great hazard of being accounted by them worse than a heathen man or a publican. 2. And hence some have advised, wholly to lay aside
John Wesley—Sermons on Several Occasions

Of Creation
Heb. xi. 3.--"Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear."--Gen. i. 1. "In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth." We are come down from the Lord's purposes and decrees to the execution of them, which is partly in the works of creation and partly in the works of providence. The Lord having resolved upon it to manifest his own glory did in that due and predeterminate time apply his
Hugh Binning—The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning

Epistle iv. To Cyriacus, Bishop.
To Cyriacus, Bishop. Gregory to Cyriacus, Bishop of Constantinople. We have received with becoming charity our common sons, George the presbyter and Theodore your deacon; and we rejoice that you have passed from the care of ecclesiastical business to the government of souls, since, according to the voice of the Truth, He that is faithful in a little will be faithful also in much (Luke xvi. 10). And to the servant who administers well it is said, Because thou hast been faithful over a few things,
Saint Gregory the Great—the Epistles of Saint Gregory the Great

The First Commandment
Thou shalt have no other gods before me.' Exod 20: 3. Why is the commandment in the second person singular, Thou? Why does not God say, You shall have no other gods? Because the commandment concerns every one, and God would have each one take it as spoken to him by name. Though we are forward to take privileges to ourselves, yet we are apt to shift off duties from ourselves to others; therefore the commandment is in the second person, Thou and Thou, that every one may know that it is spoken to him,
Thomas Watson—The Ten Commandments

Job
The book of Job is one of the great masterpieces of the world's literature, if not indeed the greatest. The author was a man of superb literary genius, and of rich, daring, and original mind. The problem with which he deals is one of inexhaustible interest, and his treatment of it is everywhere characterized by a psychological insight, an intellectual courage, and a fertility and brilliance of resource which are nothing less than astonishing. Opinion has been divided as to how the book should be
John Edgar McFadyen—Introduction to the Old Testament

Cross References
Hebrews 4:13
Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do.

Revelation 9:11
And they had a king over them, which is the angel of the bottomless pit, whose name in the Hebrew tongue is Abaddon, but in the Greek tongue hath his name Apollyon.

Job 3:13
For now should I have lain still and been quiet, I should have slept: then had I been at rest,

Job 9:5
Which removeth the mountains, and they know not: which overturneth them in his anger.

Job 11:8
It is as high as heaven; what canst thou do? deeper than hell; what canst thou know?

Job 28:22
Destruction and death say, We have heard the fame thereof with our ears.

Job 31:12
For it is a fire that consumeth to destruction, and would root out all mine increase.

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