Proverbs 20:17
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
Bread gained by deceit is sweet to a man, but afterward his mouth will be full of gravel.

King James Bible
Bread of deceit is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

American Standard Version
Bread of falsehood is sweet to a man; But afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

Douay-Rheims Bible
The bread of lying is sweet to a man: but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

English Revised Version
Bread of falsehood is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

Webster's Bible Translation
Bread of deceit is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.

Proverbs 20:17 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

11 Even a child maketh himself known by his conduct,

     Whether his dispostion be pure and whether it be right.

If מעלל may be here understood after the use of עולל, to play, to pass the time with anything, then גּם neht refers thereto: even by his play (Ewald). But granting that מעולל [children], synon. with נער, had occasioned the choice of the word מעלל (vid., Fleischer on Isaiah 3:4), yet this word never means anything else than work, an undertaking of something, and accomplishing it; wherefore Bttcher proposes מעוּליו, for מעלוּל may have meant play, in contradistinction to מעלל ot noitcni. This is possible, but conjectural. Thus gam is not taken along with b'amalalav. That the child also makes himself known by his actions, is an awkward thought; for if in anything else, in these he must show what one has to expect from him. Thus gam is after the syntactical method spoken of at Proverbs 17:26; Proverbs 19:2, to be referred to נער (also the child, even the child), although in this order it is referred to the whole clause. The verb נכר is, from its fundamental thought, to perceive, observe from an ἐναντιόσημον: to know, and to know as strange, to disown (vid., under Isaiah 3:9); the Hithpa. elsewhere signifies, like (Arab.) tankkar, to make oneself unknowable, but here to make oneself knowable; Symmachus, ἐπιγνωρισθήσεται, Venet. γνωσθήσεται. Or does the proverb mean: even the child dissembles in his actions (Oetinger)? Certainly not, for that would be a statement which, thus generally made, is not justified by experience. We must then interpret 11b as a direct question, though it has the form of an indirect one: he gives himself to be known, viz., whether his disposition be pure and right. That one may recognise his actions in the conduct of any one, is a platitude; also that one may recognise his conduct in these, is not much better. פּעל is therefore referred by Hitzig to God as the Creator, and he interprets it in the sense of the Arab. khulk, being created equals natura. We also in this way explain יצרנוּ, Psalm 103:14, as referable to God the יצר; and that poal occurs, e.g., Isaiah 1:31, not merely in the sense of action, but also in that of performance or structure, is favourable to this interpretation. But one would think that poal, if thus used in the sense of the nature of man, would have more frequently occurred. It everywhere else means action or work. And thus it is perhaps also here used to denote action, but regarded as habitual conduct, and according to the root-meaning, moral disposition. The N.T. word ἕργον approaches this idea in such passages as Galatians 6:4. It is less probable that 11b is understood with reference to the future (Luther and others); for in that case one does not see why the poet did not make use of the more intelligible phrase אם זך וישׁר יהיה פעלו. It is like our (Germ.) proverb: Was ein Haken werden will krmmt sick bald what means to become a hook bends itself early; or: Was ein Drnchen werden will spitzt sich bei Zeiten

(Note: A similar comparison from Bereschith Rabba, vid., Duke's Rabbin. Blumenlese, p. 126.)

[what means to become a thorn sharpens itself early], and to the Aram. בוצין בוצין מקטפיה ידיע equals that which will become a gourd shows itself in the bud, Berachoth 48a.

Proverbs 20:17 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Proverbs 9:17 "Stolen water is sweet; And bread eaten in secret is pleasant."

Cross References
Proverbs 9:17
"Stolen water is sweet, and bread eaten in secret is pleasant."

Proverbs 20:16
Take a man's garment when he has put up security for a stranger, and hold it in pledge when he puts up security for foreigners.

Lamentations 3:16
He has made my teeth grind on gravel, and made me cower in ashes;

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