Isaiah 50:8
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
He who vindicates me is near. Who will contend with me? Let us stand up together. Who is my adversary? Let him come near to me.

King James Bible
He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand together: who is mine adversary? let him come near to me.

American Standard Version
He is near that justifieth me; who will content with me? let us stand up together: who is mine adversary? let him come near to me.

Douay-Rheims Bible
He is near that justifieth me, who will contend with me? let us stand together, who is my adversary? let him come near to me.

English Revised Version
He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand up together: who is mine adversary? let him come near to me.

Webster's Bible Translation
He is near that justifieth me; who will contend with me? let us stand together; who is my adversary? let him come near to me.

Isaiah 50:8 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

The radical sin, however, which has lasted from the time of the captivity down to the present time, is disobedience to the word of God. This sin brought upon Zion and her children the judgment of banishment, and it was this which made it last so long. "Why did I come, and there was no one there? Why did I call, and there was no one who answered? Is my hand too short to redeem? or is there no strength in me to deliver? Behold, through my threatening I dry up the sea; turn streams into a plain: their fish rot, because there is no water, and die for thirst. I clothe the heavens in mourning, and make sackcloth their covering." Jehovah has come, and with what? It follows, from the fact of His bidding them consider, that His hand is not too short to set Israel loose and at liberty, that He is not so powerless as to be unable to draw it out; that He is the Almighty, who by His mere threatening word (Psalm 106:9; Psalm 104:7) can dry up the sea, and turn streams into a hard and barren soil, so that the fishes putrefy for want of water (Exodus 7:18, etc.), and die from thirst (thâmōth a voluntative used as an indicative, as in Isaiah 12:1, and very frequently in poetical composition); who can clothe the heavens in mourning, and make sackcloth their (dull, dark) covering (for the expression itself, compare Isaiah 37:1-2); who therefore, fiat applicatio, can annihilate the girdle of waters behind which Babylon fancies herself concealed (see Isaiah 42:15; Isaiah 44:27), and cover the empire, which is now enslaving and torturing Israel, with a sunless and starless night of destruction (Isaiah 13:10). It follows from all this, that He has come with a gospel of deliverance from sin and punishment; but Israel has given no answer, has not received this message of salvation with faith, since faith is assent to the word of God. And in whom did Jehovah come? Knobel and most of the commentators reply, "in His prophets." This answer is not wrong, but it does not suffice to show the connection between what follows and what goes before. For there it is one person who speaks; and who is that, but the servant of Jehovah, who is introduced in these prophecies with dramatic directness, as speaking in his own name? Jehovah has come to His people in His servant. We know who was the servant of Jehovah in the historical fulfilment. It was He whom even the New Testament Scriptures describe as τὸν παῖδα τοῦ κυρίου, especially in the Acts (Acts 3:13, Acts 3:26; Acts 4:27, Acts 4:30). It was not indeed during the Babylonian captivity that the servant of Jehovah appeared in Israel with the gospel of redemption; but, as we shall never be tired of repeating, this is the human element in these prophecies, that they regard the appearance of the "servant of Jehovah," the Saviour of Israel and the heathen, as connected with the captivity: the punishment of Israel terminating, according to the law of the perspective foreshortening of prophetic vision, with the termination of the captivity - a connection which we regard as one of the strongest confirmations of the composition of these addresses before the captivity, as well as of Isaiah's authorship. But this ἀνθρώπινον does not destroy the θεῖον in them, inasmuch as the time at which Jesus appeared was not only similar to that of the Babylonian captivity, but stood in a causal connection with it, since the Roman empire was the continuation of the Babylonian, and the moral state of the people under the iron arm of the Roman rule resembled that of the Babylonian exiles (Ezekiel 2:6-7). At the same time, whatever our opinion on this point may be, it is perfectly certain that it is to the servant of Jehovah, who was seen by the prophet in connection with the Babylonian captivity, that the words "wherefore did I come" refer.

Isaiah 50:8 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

near that

Romans 8:32-34 He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things...

1 Timothy 3:16 And without controversy great is the mystery of godliness: God was manifest in the flesh, justified in the Spirit, seen of angels...

let us

Isaiah 41:1,21 Keep silence before me, O islands; and let the people renew their strength: let them come near; then let them speak...

Exodus 22:9 For all manner of trespass, whether it be for ox, for donkey, for sheep, for raiment...

Deuteronomy 19:17 Then both the men, between whom the controversy is, shall stand before the LORD, before the priests and the judges...

Job 23:3-7 Oh that I knew where I might find him! that I might come even to his seat!...

Matthew 5:25 Agree with your adversary quickly, whiles you are in the way with him; lest at any time the adversary deliver you to the judge...

mine adversary. Heb. the master of my cause

Zechariah 3:1 And he showed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the LORD, and Satan standing at his right hand to resist him.

Revelation 12:10 And I heard a loud voice saying in heaven, Now is come salvation, and strength, and the kingdom of our God, and the power of his Christ...

Cross References
Romans 8:33
Who shall bring any charge against God's elect? It is God who justifies.

Romans 8:34
Who is to condemn? Christ Jesus is the one who died--more than that, who was raised--who is at the right hand of God, who indeed is interceding for us.

Job 13:19
Who is there who will contend with me? For then I would be silent and die.

Psalm 119:151
But you are near, O LORD, and all your commandments are true.

Isaiah 1:18
"Come now, let us reason together, says the LORD: though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they shall become like wool.

Isaiah 41:1
Listen to me in silence, O coastlands; let the peoples renew their strength; let them approach, then let them speak; let us together draw near for judgment.

Isaiah 43:26
Put me in remembrance; let us argue together; set forth your case, that you may be proved right.

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ESV Text Edition: 2016. The Holy Bible, English Standard Version® copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.
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