Proverbs 28:6
Better is the poor that walketh in his uprightness, than he that is perverse in his ways, though he be rich.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(6) Better is the poor that walketh . . .—A variation of Proverbs 19:1.

Perverse in his ways.—According to the pointing of the text the words signify, “perverse in two ways.” That is, the sinner tries to “go two ways” (Ecclesiasticus 2:12); to follow his own way without entirely deserting God’s; to “serve God and mammon;” he is “double-minded” (James 1:8), instead of setting before himself God’s will as the guide of his life.

Proverbs 28:6. Better is the poor — In a much safer and happier condition; that walketh in his uprightness — That sincerely desires and endeavours to walk in all well pleasing before God; than he that is perverse in his ways — Hebrew, דרכים, in two ways, that is, halting in two ways, pretending to virtue, but practising vice; or covering his wicked designs with good pretences; or sometimes erring on one hand, and sometimes on the other, as wicked men commonly do.

28:1 Sin makes men cowards. Whatever difficulties the righteous meet in the way of duty, they are not daunted. 2. National sins disturb the public repose. 3. If needy persons get opportunities of oppressing, their extortion will be more severe than that of the more wealthy. 4. Wicked people strengthen one another in wicked ways. 5. If a man seeks the Lord, it is a good sign that he understands much, and it is a good means of understanding more. 6. An honest, godly, poor man, is better than a wicked, ungodly, rich man; has more comfort in himself, and is a greater blessing to the world. 7. Companions of riotous men not only grieve their parents, but shame them. 8. That which is ill got, though it may increase much, will not last long. Thus the poor are repaid, and God is glorified. 9. The sinner at whose prayers God is angry, is one who obstinately refuses to obey God's commands. 10. The success of ungodly men is their own misery. 11. Rich men are so flattered, that they think themselves superior to others. 12. There is glory in the land when the righteous have liberty. 13. It is folly to indulge sin, and excuse it. He who covers his sins, shall not have any true peace. He who humbly confesses his sins, with true repentance and faith, shall find mercy from God. The Son of God is our great atonement. Under a deep sense of our guilt and danger, we may claim salvation from that mercy which reigns through righteousness unto eternal life, by Jesus Christ our Lord. 14. There is a fear which causes happiness. Faith and love will deliver from the fear of eternal misery; but we should always fear offending God, and fear sinning against him. 15. A wicked ruler, whatever we may call him, this scripture calls a roaring lion, and a ranging bear. 16. Oppressors want understanding; they do not consult their own honour, ease, and safety. 17. The murderer shall be haunted with terrors. None shall desire to save him from deserved punishment, nor pity him.Perverse in his ways - literally, "Perverse in his double ways." Compare Ecclesiasticus 2:12 and James 1:8. 6. (Compare Pr 10:6). Riches cannot compensate for sin, nor the want of them affect integrity. Better; in a much safer and happier condition.

In his ways, Heb. in two ways; halting between two ways, pretending to virtue, but practising vice; or covering his wicked designs with good pretences; or sometimes erring on one hand, and sometimes on the other, as wicked men commonly do.

Better is the poor that walketh in his uprightness,.... See Gill on Proverbs 19:1;

than he that is perverse in his ways, though he be rich; or, "in his two ways" (c): that halts between two ways, or makes use of both; sometimes turns to the one, to the right hand, and sometimes to the other, to the left hand; or that pretends to the one, and walks in the other; would be thought to be a virtuous and religious man, and to walk in the paths of righteousness and truth, when he walks in those of sin and wickedness. And now a poor man that walks evenly and uprightly, according to the word of God and truth of the Gospel, in the commandments and ordinances of the Lord, and in the paths of faith and holiness, is better than he; more honourable, more comfortable, and happy in life and in death; he has grace now, and will have glory hereafter.

(c) Heb. "duabus viis", Piscator, Cocceius; "pervertens duas vias", Baynus; "duplici via", Michaelis; "gemina via", Schultens, so Ben Melech.

Better is the poor that walketh in his uprightness, than he that is perverse in his ways, though he be rich.
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
6. The first half of the proverb occurs in Proverbs 19:1.

perverse in his ways] Lit. perverse of two ways: i.e. in double-dealing. Comp. “Woe … to the sinner that goeth two ways!” Sir 2:12; ἀνὴρ δίψυχος ἀκατάστατος ἐν πάσαις ταις ὁδοῖς αὐτοῦ, James 1:8.

Verse 6. - This is almost the same as Proverbs 19:1, but varies a little in the second hemistich: than he that is perverse in his ways, though he be rich. The Hebrew literally is, perverse of two ways; i.e. who, going one way, pretends to go another; the "two ways" being the evil which he really pursues, and the good which he feigns to follow. Delitzsch calls him "a double-going deceiver." So Siracides imprecates, "Woe to the sinner that goeth two ways" (Ecclus. 2:12). "A double-minded man," says St James (James 1:8), "is unstable in all his ways." It is not the endeavouring to serve God and mammon at the same time that is meant, but putting on the appearance of religion to mask wicked designs - in the present case in order to gain wealth. Septuagint, "A poor man walking in truth is better than a rich liar." Proverbs 28:6What is stated in this proverb is a conclusion from the preceding, with which it is also externally connected, for רשׁ ( equals ראשׁ), רשׁע, רע, and now רשׁ, follow each other:

Better a poor man who walketh in his innocence,

Than a double-going deceiver who is rich thereby.

A variation of Proverbs 19:1. Stainlessness, integritas vitae, as a consequence of unreserved devotion to God, gives to a man with poverty a higher worth and nobility than riches connected with falsehood which "halts between two opinions" (1 Kings 18:21), and appears to go one way, while in reality it goes another. The two ways דּדכים (cf. Sir. 2:12, οὐαί ἁμαρτωλῷ ... ἐπιβαίνοντι ἐπὶ δύο τρίβους) are, as Proverbs 28:18, not ways going aside to the right or to the left of the right way, but the evil way which the deceiver truly walks in, and the good way which he pretends to walk in (Fleischer); the two ways of action placed over against one another, by one of which he masks the other.

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