2 Samuel 7:20
And what can David say more unto thee? for thou, Lord GOD, knowest thy servant.
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
2 Samuel 7:20-21. What can David say — Either in a way of gratitude and praise — Words cannot express my obligations to thee, nor my sense of these obligations — or in a way of prayer: What can I ask of thee more than thou hast freely done? Thou knowest thy servant — Thou knowest my deep sense of thy favours, and my obligations to thee; and my condition and necessities, what I do or may need hereafter; and as thou knowest this, so I doubt not thou wilt supply me. Thy word’s sake — That thou mightest fulfil thy promises made to me, and thereby demonstrate thy faithfulness. According to thine own heart — Of thy own mere liberality and good pleasure, without any desert of mine. So far was David, though a very gracious man, from thinking his actions meritorious. To make thy servant know them — Thus David expresses the deep sense he had of the extraordinary kindness of God, not only in designing these great things for him and his posterity, but in condescending to make them known to him.

7:18-29 David's prayer is full of the breathings of devout affection toward God. He had low thoughts of his own merits. All we have, must be looked upon as Divine gifts. He speaks very highly and honourably of the Lord's favours to him. Considering what the character and condition of man is, we may be amazed that God should deal with him as he does. The promise of Christ includes all; if the Lord God be ours, what more can we ask, or think of? Eph 3:20. He knows us better than we know ourselves; therefore let us be satisfied with what he has done for us. What can we say more for ourselves in our prayers, than God has said for us in his promises? David ascribes all to the free grace of God. Both the great things He had done for him, and the great things He had made known to him. All was for his word's sake, that is, for the sake of Christ the eternal Word. Many, when they go to pray, have their hearts to seek, but David's heart was found, that is, it was fixed; gathered in from its wanderings, entirely engaged to the duty, and employed in it. That prayer which is from the tongue only, will not please God; it must be found in the heart; that must be lifted up and poured out before God. He builds his faith, and hopes to speed, upon the sureness of God's promise. David prays for the performance of the promise. With God, saying and doing are not two things, as they often are with men; God will do as he hath said. The promises of God are not made to us by name, as to David, but they belong to all who believe in Jesus Christ, and plead them in his name.Is this the manner of man - Compare 1 Chronicles 17:17. Our passage may be thus understood: But this is the law (or prerogative) of a great man to found dynasties which are to last into the far future. David expresses his astonishment that he, of such humble birth, and one so little in his own eyes, should not only be raised to the throne, but be assured of the perpetuity of the succession in his descendants, as if he were a man of high degree. 20. what can David say more unto thee?—that is, my obligations are greater than I can express. What can David say more unto thee? either, first, In way of gratitude and praise to thee; words cannot express my obligations to thee, nor my sense of these obligations. Or rather, secondly, In way of prayer, as appears by the parallel place, 1 Chronicles 17:18. What can I ask or desire of thee more than thou hast freely done?

Thou knowest thy servant; thou knowest, either, first, my deep sense of thy favours, and my obligations to thee; or rather, secondly, my condition and necessities, what I do or may need hereafter; and as thou knowest this, so I doubt not thou wilt be ready to supply me accordingly. Compare Matthew 6:8,32.

And what can David say more unto thee,.... In a way of self-abasement, or in thankfulness for such wonderful favours, or in prayer for more and other mercies; he wants words, as if he should say, to express his sense of his own nothingness and unworthiness, and to praise the Lord for all his benefits; and so large are the grants and promises made, that there is no room for him to ask for more:

for thou, Lord God, knowest thy servant; what a sense he has of his own meanness and vileness, what gratitude his heart is filled with, and what his wants and necessities are, which God only can supply, and does abundantly, even more than he is able to ask or think. The Targum is,"and thou hast performed the petition of thy servant, O Lord God.''

And what can David say more unto thee? for thou, Lord GOD, knowest thy servant.
EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
20. thou, Lord God, knowest thy servant] Words fail, and David appeals to God’s omniscience. Cp. Psalm 17:3; Psalm 139:1-4; John 21:17.

Verse 20. - Thou, Lord. God, knowest thy servant. The Hebrew throughout has Lord Jehovah, except in vers. 22, 25, where it has "Jehovah God," the title of Deity used in Genesis 2. The repeated use Of this covenant and personal name of God is very emphatic; and the appeal to Jehovah's knowledge of his heart reminds us of similar outpourings of David's consciousness of his sincere devotion to his Maker, as for instance in Psalm 17:3. 2 Samuel 7:20"And what more shall David speak to Thee? Thou knowest Thy servant, Lord Jehovah." Instead of expressing his gratitude still further in many words, David appeals to the omniscience of God, before whom his thankful heart lies open, just as in Psalm 40:10 (compare also Psalm 17:3).
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