Psalm 35:13
Parallel Verses
English Standard Version
But I, when they were sick— I wore sackcloth; I afflicted myself with fasting; I prayed with head bowed on my chest.

King James Bible
But as for me, when they were sick, my clothing was sackcloth: I humbled my soul with fasting; and my prayer returned into mine own bosom.

American Standard Version
But as for me, when they were sick, my clothing was sackcloth: I afflicted my soul with fasting; And my prayer returned into mine own bosom.

Douay-Rheims Bible
But as for me, when they were troublesome to me, I was clothed with haircloth. I humbled my soul with fasting; and my prayer shall be turned into my bosom.

English Revised Version
But as for me, when they were sick, my clothing was sackcloth: I afflicted my soul with fasting; and my prayer returned into mine own bosom.

Webster's Bible Translation
But as for me, when they were sick, my clothing was sackcloth: I humbled my soul with fasting; and my prayer returned into my own bosom.

Psalm 35:13 Parallel
Commentary
Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament

Psalm 35:7 also needs re-organising, just as in Psalm 35:5. the original positions of דחה and רדפס are exchanged. שׁחת רשׁתּם would be a pit deceptively covered over with a net concealed below; but, as even some of the older critics have felt, שׁחת is without doubt to be brought down from Psalm 35:7 into Psalm 35:7: without cause, i.e., without any provocation on my part, have they secretly laid their net for me (as in Psalm 9:16; Psalm 31:5), without cause have they digged a pit for my soul. In Psalm 35:8 the foes are treated of collectively. לא ידע is a negative circumstantial clause (Ew. 341, b): improviso, as in Proverbs 5:6; Isaiah 47:11 extrem. Instead of תּלכּדנּוּ the expression is תּלכּדוּ, as in Hosea 8:3; the sharper form is better adapted to depict the suddenness and certainty of the capture. According to Hupfeld, the verb שׁאה signifies a wild, dreary, confused noise or crash, then devastation and destruction, a transition of meaning which - as follows from שׁואה (cf. תּהוּ) as a name of the desolate steppe, from שׁוא, a waste, emptiness, and from other indications - is solely brought about by transferring the idea of a desolate confusion of tones to a desolate confusion of things, without any intermediate notion of the crashing in of ruins. But it may be asked whether the reverse is not rather the case, viz., that the signification of a waste, desert, emptiness or void is the primary one, and the meaning that has reference to sound (cf. Arab. hwâ, to gape, be empty; to drive along, fall down headlong, then also: to make a dull sound as of something falling, just like rumor from ruere, fragor (from frangi) the derived one. Both etymology (cf. תּהה, whence תּהוּ) and the preponderance of other meanings, favour this latter view. Here the two significations are found side by side, inasmuch as שׁואה in the first instance means a waste equals devastation, desolation, and in the second a waste equals a heavy, dull sound, a rumbling (δουπεῖν). In the Syriac version it is rendered: "into the pit which he has digged let him fall," as though it were שׁחת in the second instance instead of שׁואה; and from his Hupfeld, with J. H. Michaelis, Stier, and others, is of opinion, that it must be rendered: "into the destruction which he himself has prepared let him fall." But this quam ipse paravit is not found in the text, and to mould the text accordingly would be a very arbitrary proceeding.

Psalm 35:13 Parallel Commentaries

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

when

Psalm 69:10,11 When I wept, and chastened my soul with fasting, that was to my reproach...

Job 30:25 Did not I weep for him that was in trouble? was not my soul grieved for the poor?

Matthew 5:44 But I say to you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you...

Romans 12:14,15 Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not...

humbled. or, afflicted

Leviticus 16:29,31 And this shall be a statute for ever to you: that in the seventh month, on the tenth day of the month, you shall afflict your souls...

Matthew 9:14,15 Then came to him the disciples of John, saying, Why do we and the Pharisees fast oft, but your disciples fast not...

my prayer

Matthew 10:13 And if the house be worthy, let your peace come on it: but if it be not worthy, let your peace return to you.

Luke 10:6 And if the son of peace be there, your peace shall rest on it: if not, it shall turn to you again.

Cross References
Matthew 10:13
And if the house is worthy, let your peace come upon it, but if it is not worthy, let your peace return to you.

Luke 10:6
And if a son of peace is there, your peace will rest upon him. But if not, it will return to you.

Job 30:25
Did not I weep for him whose day was hard? Was not my soul grieved for the needy?

Psalm 69:10
When I wept and humbled my soul with fasting, it became my reproach.

Psalm 69:11
When I made sackcloth my clothing, I became a byword to them.

Psalm 79:12
Return sevenfold into the lap of our neighbors the taunts with which they have taunted you, O Lord!

Psalm 109:24
My knees are weak through fasting; my body has become gaunt, with no fat.

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