Nabataeans
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International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
NABATAEANS; NABATHAEANS

nab-a-te'-anz, nab-a-the'-anz (Nabataioi; in 1 Maccabees 5:25 Codex Sinaiticus reads anabatais hoi, V, Anabattaiois; the King James Version Nabathites, more correctly "Nabataeans"):

1. Locality and Early History:

A Semitic (Arabian rather than Syrian) tribe whose home in early Hellenistic times was Southeast of Palestine, where they had either supplanted or mingled with the Edomites (compare Malachi 1:1-5). In Josephus' day they were so numerous that the territory between the Red Sea and the Euphrates was called Nabatene (Ant., I, xii, 4). They extended themselves along the East of the Jordan with Petra as their capital (Strabo xvi0.779; Josephus, Ant, XIV, i, 4; XVII, iii, 2; BJ, I, vi, 2, etc.). Their earlier history is shrouded in obscurity. Jerome, Quaeat in Genesis 25:13, following the hint of Josephus (Ant., I, xii, 4), asserts they were identical with the Ishmaelite tribe of Nebaioth, which is possible, though Nebaioth is spelled with the Hebrew letter taw ("t") and Nabateans is spelled with the Hebrew letter teth ("t). They were apparently the first allies of the Assyrians in their invasions of Edom (compare Malachi 1:1;). They were later subdued by Sennacherib (Sayce, New Light from the Ancient Monuments, II, 430), but before long regained their independence and resisted Ashurbanipal (Rawlinson, note, at the place). According to Alexander Polyhistor (Fr. 18), they were included in the nomadic tribes reduced by David. Their history is more detailed from 312 B.C. (Diod. Sic. xix), when Antigonus I (Cyclops) sent his general Athenaeus with a force against them in Petra. After an initial advantage, the army of Athenaeus was almost annihilated. Demetrius, the son of Antigonus, was sent against them a few years later, with little success, though he arranged a friendship with them. The first prince mentioned is Aretas I, to whom the high priest Jason fled in 169 B.C. They were friendly to the early Maccabees in the anti-Hellenistic struggle, to Judas in 164 B.C. (1 Maccabees 5:25) and to Jonathan in 160 B.C. (1 Maccabees 9:35).

2. A Strong Kingdom:

Toward the end of the 2nd century B.C. on the fall of the Ptolemaic and Seleucid Dynasties, the Nabateans under King Erotimus founded a strong kingdom extending East of the Jordan (in 110 B.C.). Conscious now of their own strength, they resented the ambition of the Hasmonean Dynasty-their former allies-and opposed Alexander Janneus (96 B.C.) at the siege of Gaza (Josephus, Ant, XIII, xiii, 3). A few years later (90 B.C.) Alexander retaliated by attacking Obedas I, king of the Nabateans, but suffered a severe defeat East of the Jordan (Josephus, Ant, XIII, xiii, 5; BJ, I, iv, 4). Antiochus XII of Coele-Syria next led an expedition against the Nabateans, but was defeated and slain in the battle of Kana (Josephus, Ant, XIII, xv, 1-2; BJ, I, iv, 7-8). Consequently, Aretas III seized Coele-Syria and Damascus and gained another victory over Alexander Janneus at Adida (in 85 B.C.).

3. Conflicts:

The Nabateans, led by Aretas (III (?)), espoused the cause of Hyrcanus against Aristobulus, besieged the latter in Jerusalem and provoked the interference of the Romans, by whom under Scaurus they were defeated (Josephus, Ant, XIV, i, 4 f; BJ, I, vi, 2). After the capture of Jerusalem, Pompey attacked Aretas, but was satisfied with a payment (Josephus, ibid.), and Damascus was added to Syria, though later it appears to have again passed into the hands of Aretas (2 Corinthians 11:32). In 55 B.C. Gabinius led another force against the Nabateans (Josephus, ibid.). In 47 B.C. Malchus I assisted Caesar, but in 40 B.C. refused to assist Herod against the Parthians, thus provoking both the Idumean Dynasty and the Romans. Antony made a present of part of Malchus' territory to Cleopatra, and the Nabatean kingdom was further humiliated by disastrous defeat in the war against Herod (31 B.C.).

4. End of the Nation:

Under Aretas IV (9 B.C.-40 A.D.) the kingdom was recognized by Augustus. This king sided with the Romans against the Jews, and further gained a great victory over Herod Antipas, who had divorced his daughter to marry Herodias. Under King Abias an expedition against Adiabene came to grief. Malchus II (48-71 A.D.) assisted the Romans in the conquest of Jerusalem (Josephus, BJ, III, iv, 2). Rabel (71-106 A.D.) was the last king of the Nabateans as a nation. In 106 A.D. their nationality was broken up by the unwise policy of Trajan, and Arabia, of which Petra was the capital, was made a Roman province by Cornelius Palma, governor of Syria. Otherwise they might have at least contributed to protecting the West against the East. Diodorus (loc. cit.) represents the Nabateans as a wild nomadic folk, with no agriculture, but with flocks and herds and engaged in considerable trading. Later, however, they seem to have imbibed considerable Aramean culture, and Aramaic became at least the language of their commerce and diplomacy. They were also known as pirates on the Red Sea; they secured the harbor of Elah and the Gulf of `Akaba. They traded between Egypt and Mesopotamia and carried on a lucrative commerce in myrrh, frankincense and costly wares (KGF, 4th edition (1901), I, 726-44, with full bibliography).

S. Angus

Greek
702. Aretas -- Aretas, an Arabian king
... Part of Speech: Noun, Masculine Transliteration: Aretas Phonetic Spelling:
(ar-et'-as) Short Definition: Aretas Definition: Aretas IV, King of the Nabataeans. ...
//strongsnumbers.com/greek2/702.htm - 6k
Library

The Power of Assyria at Its Zenith; Esarhaddon and Assur-Bani-Pal
... Attack on Indabigash"Tammaritu restored to power"Pillage and destruction of
Susa"Campaign against the Arabs of Kedar and the Nabataeans: suppression of ...
/.../chapter iithe power of assyria.htm

The Personal History of Herod - the Two Worlds in Jerusalem.
... By this Idum├Ža we are not, however, to understand the ancient or Eastern Edom, which
was now in the hands of the Nabataeans, but parts of Southern Palestine ...
/.../the life and times of jesus the messiah/chapter ii the personal history.htm

Sennacherib (705-681 BC )
... tribes on the east of the Tigris up to the frontiers of Elam, the Tumuna, the Ubudu,
the Gambulu, and the Khindaru, as also over the Nabataeans and Hagarenes ...
/.../chapter isennacherib 705-681 b c.htm

Chapter xxv
... Yet KW still retains the old identification with the Nabataeans, who after
the Exile made Petra in Edom their stronghold and capital. ...
//christianbookshelf.org/leupold/exposition of genesis volume 1/chapter xxv.htm

The Medes and the Second Chaldaean Empire
History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, V 8. <. ...
/.../chapter iiithe medes and the.htm

The Power of Assyria at Its Zenith; Esarhaddon and Assur-Bani-Pal
History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, V 8. <. ...
/.../chapter iithe power of assyria 2.htm

Thesaurus
Nabataeans
... Int. Standard Bible Encyclopedia NABATAEANS; NABATHAEANS. nab-a-te'-anz,
nab-a-the'-anz (Nabataioi; in 1 Maccabees 5:25 Codex Sinaiticus ...
/n/nabataeans.htm - 11k

Nabathaeans
... Int. Standard Bible Encyclopedia NABATAEANS; NABATHAEANS. nab-a-te'-anz,
nab-a-the'-anz (Nabataioi; in 1 Maccabees 5:25 Codex Sinaiticus ...
/n/nabathaeans.htm - 11k

Nabarias

/n/nabarias.htm - 6k

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Nabataeans

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