Revelation 9:12
Parallel Verses
New International Version
The first woe is past; two other woes are yet to come.

New Living Translation
The first terror is past, but look, two more terrors are coming!

English Standard Version
The first woe has passed; behold, two woes are still to come.

New American Standard Bible
The first woe is past; behold, two woes are still coming after these things.

King James Bible
One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more hereafter.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
The first woe has passed. There are still two more woes to come after this.

International Standard Version
The first catastrophe is over. After these things, there are still two more catastrophes to come.

NET Bible
The first woe has passed, but two woes are still coming after these things!

Aramaic Bible in Plain English
One woe is gone; behold, again two woes are coming.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
The first catastrophe is over. After these things there are two more catastrophes yet to come.

Jubilee Bible 2000
The first woe is past; and, behold, there come two more woes after these things.

King James 2000 Bible
One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more after these.

American King James Version
One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more hereafter.

American Standard Version
The first Woe is past: behold, there come yet two Woes hereafter.

Douay-Rheims Bible
One woe is past, and behold there come yet two woes more hereafter.

Darby Bible Translation
The first woe has passed. Behold, there come yet two woes after these things.

English Revised Version
The first Woe is past: behold, there come yet two Woes hereafter.

Webster's Bible Translation
One woe is past; and behold, there come two woes more hereafter.

Weymouth New Testament
The first woe is past; two other woes have still to come.

World English Bible
The first woe is past. Behold, there are still two woes coming after this.

Young's Literal Translation
The first woe did go forth, lo, there come yet two woes after these things.
Parallel Commentaries
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

9:1-12 Upon sounding the fifth trumpet, a star fell from heaven to the earth. Having ceased to be a minister of Christ, he who is represented by this star becomes the minister of the devil; and lets loose the powers of hell against the churches of Christ. On the opening of the bottomless pit, there arose a great smoke. The devil carries on his designs by blinding the eyes of men, by putting out light and knowledge, and promoting ignorance and error. Out of this smoke there came a swarm of locusts, emblems of the devil's agents, who promote superstition, idolatry, error, and cruelty. The trees and the grass, the true believers, whether young or more advanced, should be untouched. But a secret poison and infection in the soul, should rob many others of purity, and afterwards of peace. The locusts had no power to hurt those who had the seal of God. God's all-powerful, distinguishing grace will keep his people from total and final apostacy. The power is limited to a short season; but it would be very sharp. In such events the faithful share the common calamity, but from the pestilence of error they might and would be safe. We collect from Scripture, that such errors were to try and prove the Christians, 1Co 11:19. And early writers plainly refer this to the first great host of corrupters who overspread the Christian church.

Pulpit Commentary

Verse 12. - One woe is past; the one woe, or the first woe. "Woe" (ἡ οὐαί) is feminine; perhaps because expressing the idea of tribulation, such words being generally feminine in the Greek. Some have thought that these words are a further announcement by the eagle of Revelation 8:13; but there is nothing to lead us to suppose that they are not the words of the writer. And, behold, there come two woes more hereafter. Omit "and:" behold, there cometh yet two woes hereafter. The verb is singular in א, A, and others; the plural is found in א, B, P, and others. Alford says, "singular, the verb applying simply to that which is future, without reference as yet to its plurality." But probably οὐαί, although written as a feminine in the preceding clause, being really indeclinable, is treated as a neuter; and thus the singular verb is made to agree with the neuter plural, in conformity with the rules of Greek grammar. The second woe extends from this place to Revelation 11:14, and the third woe is contained in Revelation 11:14-19, especially in Revelation 11:18.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

One woe is past,.... One of the three woe trumpets, the first of them; that is, in the vision which John had of it, not the thing itself designed by it:

and behold there come two woes more hereafter; under the blowing of the sixth and seventh trumpets.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

12. Greek, "The one woe."

hereafter—Greek, "after these things." I agree with Alford and De Burgh, that these locusts from the abyss refer to judgments about to fall on the ungodly immediately before Christ's second advent. None of the interpretations which regard them as past, are satisfactory. Joe 1:2-7; 2:1-11, is strictly parallel and expressly refers (Joe 2:11) to THE DAY OF THE Lord great and very terrible: Joe 2:10 gives the portents accompanying the day of the Lord's coming, the earth quaking, the heavens trembling, the sun, moon, and stars, withdrawing their shining: Joe 2:18, 31, 32, also point to the immediately succeeding deliverance of Jerusalem: compare also, the previous last conflict in the valley of Jehoshaphat, and the dwelling of God thenceforth in Zion, blessing Judah. De Burgh confines the locust judgment to the Israelite land, even as the sealed in Re 7:1-8 are Israelites: not that there are not others sealed as elect in the earth; but that, the judgment being confined to Palestine, the sealed of Israel alone needed to be expressly excepted from the visitation. Therefore, he translates throughout, "the land" (that is, of Israel and Judah), instead of "the earth." I incline to agree with him.

Revelation 9:12 Additional Commentaries
Context
The Fifth Trumpet
11They have as king over them, the angel of the abyss; his name in Hebrew is Abaddon, and in the Greek he has the name Apollyon. 12The first woe is past; behold, two woes are still coming after these things.
Cross References
Revelation 8:13
As I watched, I heard an eagle that was flying in midair call out in a loud voice: "Woe! Woe! Woe to the inhabitants of the earth, because of the trumpet blasts about to be sounded by the other three angels!"

Revelation 11:14
The second woe has passed; the third woe is coming soon.
Treasury of Scripture

One woe is past; and, behold, there come two woes more hereafter.

woe. See on ver.

Revelation 9:1,2 And the fifth angel sounded, and I saw a star fall from heaven to …

two.

Revelation 9:13-21 And the sixth angel sounded, and I heard a voice from the four horns …

Revelation 8:13 And I beheld, and heard an angel flying through the middle of heaven, …

Revelation 11:14 The second woe is past; and, behold, the third woe comes quickly.

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