Proverbs 20:19
Parallel Verses
New International Version
A gossip betrays a confidence; so avoid anyone who talks too much.

King James Bible
He that goeth about as a talebearer revealeth secrets: therefore meddle not with him that flattereth with his lips.

Darby Bible Translation
He that goeth about talebearing revealeth secrets; therefore meddle not with him that openeth his lips.

World English Bible
He who goes about as a tale-bearer reveals secrets; therefore don't keep company with him who opens wide his lips.

Young's Literal Translation
A revealer of secret counsels is the busybody, And for a deceiver with his lips make not thyself surety.

Proverbs 20:19 Parallel
Commentary
Clarke's Commentary on the Bible

With good advice make war, - Perhaps there is not a precept in this whole book so little regarded as this. Most of the wars that are undertaken are wars of injustice, ambition, aggrandizement, and caprice, which can have had no previous good counsel. A minister, who is perhaps neither a good nor a great man, counsels his king to make war; the cabinet must be brought into it, and a sufficient number out of the states of the kingdom gained over to support it. By and by, what was begun through caprice must be maintained through necessity. Places must be created, and offices must be filled with needy dependents, whose interest it may be to protract the war, till they get enough to pay their debts, and secure independence for life. And for these most important ends the blood of the country is spilled, and the treasures of the people exhausted! I have met with a fact precisely of this kind under the reign of Louis XIV.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

that goeth

Proverbs 11:13 A talebearer reveals secrets: but he that is of a faithful spirit conceals the matter.

Proverbs 18:8 The words of a talebearer are as wounds, and they go down into the innermost parts of the belly.

Proverbs 26:20-22 Where no wood is, there the fire goes out: so where there is no talebearer, the strife ceases...

Leviticus 19:16 You shall not go up and down as a talebearer among your people: neither shall you stand against the blood of your neighbor...

meddle

Proverbs 24:21 My son, fear you the LORD and the king: and meddle not with them that are given to change:

flattereth

Proverbs 16:29 A violent man entices his neighbor, and leads him into the way that is not good.

Romans 16:18 For they that are such serve not our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly...

Library
Bread and Gravel
'"Bread of deceit" is sweet to a man; but afterwards his mouth shall be filled with gravel.'--PROVERBS xx. 17. 'Bread of deceit' is a somewhat ambiguous phrase, which may mean either of two things, and perhaps means both. It may either mean any good obtained by deceit, or good which deceives in its possession. In the former signification it would appear to have reference primarily to unjustly gotten gain, while in the latter it has a wider meaning and applies to all the worthless treasures and lying
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions of Holy Scripture

The Sluggard's Reproof
A Sermon (No. 2766) intended for reading on Lord's Day, February 16, 1902 delivered by C.H. Spurgeon at New Park Street Chapel, Southwark on a Thursday Evening, during the Winter of 1859. "The sluggard will not plow by reason of the cold; therefore shall he beg in harvest, and have nothing." {cold: or, winter}-- Proverbs 20:4. Laziness is the crying sin of Eastern nations. I believe that the peculiar genius of the Anglo-Saxon character prevents our being, as a nation, guilty of that sin. Perhaps
C.H. Spurgeon—Sermons on Proverbs

The Tears of the Penitent.
Adversity had taught David self-restraint, had braced his soul, had driven him to grasp firmly the hand of God. And prosperity had seemed for nearly twenty years but to perfect the lessons. Gratitude had followed deliverance, and the sunshine after the rain had brought out the fragrance of devotion and the blossoms of glad songs. A good man, and still more a man of David's age at the date of his great crime, seldom falls so low, unless there has been previous, perhaps unconscious, relaxation of the
Alexander Maclaren—The Life of David

How the Slothful and the Hasty are to be Admonished.
(Admonition 16.) Differently to be admonished are the slothful and the hasty. For the former are to be persuaded not to lose, by putting it off, the good they have to do; but the latter are to be admonished lest, while they forestall the time of good deeds by inconsiderate haste, they change their meritorious character. To the slothful therefore it is to be intimated, that often, when we will not do at the right time what we can, before long, when we will, we cannot. For the very indolence of
Leo the Great—Writings of Leo the Great

Proverbs 20:18
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