The Peratæ.
The Peratæ, however, viz., Ademes the Carystian, and Euphrates the Peratic, say that there is some one world, -- this is the denomination they use, -- and affirming that it is divided into three parts. But of the threefold division, according to them, there is one principle, just like an immense fountain, capable of being by reason divided into infinite segments. And the first segment, and the one of more proximity, according to them, is the triad, and is called a perfect good, and a paternal magnitude. But the second portion of the triad is a certain multitude of, as it were, infinite powers. The third part, however, is formal. And the first is unbegotten; [1044] whence they expressly affirm that there are three Gods, three Logoi, three minds, (and) three men. For when the division has been accomplished, to each part of the world they assign both Gods, and Logoi, and men, and the rest. But from above, from uncreatedness and the first segment of the world, when afterwards the world had attained to its consummation, the Peratic affirms that there came down, in the times of Herod, a certain man with a threefold nature, and a threefold body, and a threefold power, named Christ, and that He possesses from the three parts of the world in Himself all the concretions and capacities of the world. And they are disposed to think that this is what has been declared, "in whom dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily." [1045] And they assert that from the two worlds situated above -- namely, both the unbegotten one and self-begotten one -- there were borne down into this world in which we are, germs of all sorts of powers. And (they say) that Christ came down from above from uncreatedness, in order that, by His descent, all things that have been divided into three parts may be saved. For, says the Peratic, the things that have been borne down from above will ascend through Him; and the things that have plotted against those that have been borne down are heedlessly rejected, [1046] and sent away to be punished. And the Peratic states that there are two parts which are saved -- that is, those that are situated above -- by having been separated from corruption, and that the third is destroyed, which he calls a formal world. These also are the tenets of the Peratæ.

[1044] Cruice supplies from Theodoret: "and the second which is good is self-begotten, and the third is generated."

[1045] Colossians 2:9.

[1046] aphietai eike: Bernays proposes ophioeide, i.e., being of the form of the serpent.

chapter v the naasseni
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