Genesis 11:26
Verse (Click for Chapter)
New International Version
After Terah had lived 70 years, he became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran.

New Living Translation
After Terah was 70 years old, he became the father of Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

English Standard Version
When Terah had lived 70 years, he fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

New American Standard Bible
Terah lived seventy years, and became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran.

King James Bible
And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
Terah lived 70 years and fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

International Standard Version
When Terah had lived 70 years, he fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

NET Bible
When Terah had lived 70 years, he became the father of Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

New Heart English Bible
Terah lived seventy years, and became the father of Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

GOD'S WORD® Translation
Terah was 70 years old when he became the father of Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

JPS Tanakh 1917
And Terah lived seventy years, and begot Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

New American Standard 1977
And Terah lived seventy years, and became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran.

Jubilee Bible 2000
And Terah lived seventy years and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

King James 2000 Bible
And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

American King James Version
And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

American Standard Version
And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And Thare lived seventy years, and begot Abram, and Nachor, and Aran.

Darby Bible Translation
And Terah lived seventy years, and begot Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

English Revised Version
And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

Webster's Bible Translation
And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

World English Bible
Terah lived seventy years, and became the father of Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

Young's Literal Translation
And Terah liveth seventy years, and begetteth Abram, Nahor, and Haran.
Study Bible
Genealogy from Shem to Abram
25and Nahor lived one hundred and nineteen years after he became the father of Terah, and he had other sons and daughters. 26Terah lived seventy years, and became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran. 27Now these are the records of the generations of Terah. Terah became the father of Abram, Nahor and Haran; and Haran became the father of Lot.…
Cross References
Luke 3:34
the son of Jacob, the son of Isaac, the son of Abraham, the son of Terah, the son of Nahor,

Genesis 11:25
and Nahor lived one hundred and nineteen years after he became the father of Terah, and he had other sons and daughters.

Joshua 24:2
Joshua said to all the people, "Thus says the LORD, the God of Israel, 'From ancient times your fathers lived beyond the River, namely, Terah, the father of Abraham and the father of Nahor, and they served other gods.
Treasury of Scripture

And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran.

A.M.

Genesis 12:4,5 So Abram departed, as the LORD had spoken to him; and Lot went with him…

Genesis 22:20-24 And it came to pass after these things, that it was told Abraham, …

Genesis 29:4,5 And Jacob said to them, My brothers, from where be you? And they …

Joshua 24:2 And Joshua said to all the people, Thus said the LORD God of Israel, …

1 Chronicles 1:26,27 Serug, Nahor, Terah…

Verse 26. - And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram. First named on account of his spiritual pre-eminence. If Abram was Terah's eldest son, then, as Abram was seventy-five years of age when Terah died (Genesis 12:4), Terah's whole life could only have been 145 years. But Terah lived to the age of 205 years (Genesis 11:32); therefore Abram was born in Terah's 130th year. This, however, makes it surprising that Abraham should have reckoned it impossible for him to have a son at 100 years (Genesis 17:17); only, after having lived so long in childless wedlock, it was not strange that he should feel somewhat doubtful of any issue by Sarai. Kalisch believes that Stephen (Acts 7:4) made a mistake in saying Terah died before his son's migration from Charran, and that he really survived that event by sixty years; while the Samaritan text escapes the difficulty by shortening the life of Terah to 145 years. And Nahor, who must have been younger than Haran, since he married Haran's daughter. And Haran, who, as the eldest, must have been born in Terah's seventieth year. Thus the second family register, like the flint, concludes after ten generations with the birth of three sons, who, like Noah's, are mentioned not in the order of their ages, but of their spiritual pre-eminence.

From this table it appears that 292 years, according to the Hebrew text, passed away between the Flood and the birth, or 292 +75 = = 367 between the Flood and the call of Abraham. Reckoning, however, the age of Torah at Abram's birth as 130 (vide Exposition), the full period between the Deluge and the patriarch's departure from Haran will be 367 + 60 = = 427 years, which, allowing five pairs to each family, Murphy computes, would in the course of ten generations yield a population of 15,625,000 souls; or, supposing a rate of increase equal to that of Abraham's posterity in Egypt during the 400 years that elapsed from the call to the exodus, the inhabitants of the world in the time of Abraham would be between seven and eight millions. It must, however, be remembered that an element of uncertainty enters into all computations based upon even the Hebrew text. The age of Terah at the birth (apparently) of Abram is put down at seventy. But it admits of demonstration that Abram was born in the 130th year of Terah. What guarantee then do we possess that in every instance the registered son was the firstborn? In the case of Arphaxad this is almost implied in the statement that he was born two years after the Flood. But if the case of Eber were parallel with that of Terah, and Joktan were the son that he begat in his thirty-fourth year, then obviously the birth of Peleg, like that of Abram, may have happened sixty years later; in which case it is apparent that any reckoning which proceeded on the minute verbal accuracy of the registered numbers would be entirely at fault. This consideration might have gone far to explain the wide divergence between the numbers of the Samaritan and Septuagint as compared with the Hebrew text, had it not been that they both agree with it in setting down seventy as the age of Terah at the date of Abram's birth. The palpable artificiality also of these later tables renders them even less worthy of credit than the Hebrew. The introduction by the LXX. of Cainan as the son of Arphaxad, though seemingly confirmed by Luke (Luke 3:35, 36), is clearly an interpolation. It does not occur in the LXX. version of 1 Chronicles 1:24, and is not found in either the Samaritan Pentateuch, the Targums or the ancient versions, in Josephus or Philo, or in the Codex Beza of the Gospel of Luke. Its appearance in Luke (and probably also in the LXX.) can only be explained as an interpolation. Wordsworth is inclined to regard it as authentic in Luke, and to suppose that Cainaan was excluded from the Mosaic table either to render it symmetrical, as Luke's table is rendered symmetrical by its insertion, or because of some moral offence, which, though necessitating his expulsion from a Hebrew register, would not prevent his reappearance in his proper place under the gospel.

And Terah lived seventy years, and begat Abram, Nahor, and Haran. Abram, though named first, does not appear to be the eldest, but rather Haran; nay, it seems pretty plain that Abram was not born until the one hundred and thirtieth year of his father's life, for Terah was two hundred and five years old when he died, Genesis 11:32 and Abram was but seventy five years of age when he went out of Haran to Canaan, Genesis 12:4 and that was as soon as his father died there; and so that if seventy five are taken out two hundred and five, there will remain one hundred and thirty, in which year and not before Abram must be born: the wife of Terah, of whom Abram was born, according to the Jewish writers (x), her name was Chamtelaah, the daughter of Carnebo, or as others (y) call her, Amthalai; but by the Arabic writers (z) she is called Juna: the Jews say (a) Terah was the first that found out the way of coining money, and that in his days men began to worship images, and that he was the chief of their priests, but afterwards repented; and that he was an idolater appears from Joshua 24:2.

(x) Shalshalet Hakabala, fol. 2. 1. & Bathra in ib. (y) Pirke Eliezer, c. 26. (z) Elmacinus, p. 31. Patricides, p. 17. apud Hottinger. p. 281. (a) Shalshalet, fol. 76. 1.11:10-26 Here is a genealogy, or list of names, ending in Abram, the friend of God, and thus leading towards Christ, the promised Seed, who was the son of Abram. Nothing is left upon record but their names and ages; the Holy Ghost seeming to hasten through them to the history of Abram. How little do we know of those that are gone before us in this world, even of those that lived in the same places where we live, as we likewise know little of those who now live in distant places! We have enough to do to mind our own work. When the earth began to be peopled, men's lives began to shorten; this was the wise disposal of Providence.
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Alphabetical: 70 After and became father had Haran he lived Nahor of seventy Terah the years

OT Law: Genesis 11:26 Terah lived seventy years and became (Gen. Ge Gn) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools
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