Arabia Felix
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Description of the Wilderness, and the Question About the Death of ...
... [1363] Cf. Amos 1:1. [1364] Saraceni (Sarakenoi) a name given by the classical
geographers to a tribe of Arabia Felix, famous for its predatory propensities. ...
/.../cassian/the works of john cassian /chapter i description of the.htm

Detached Account of Abenadar.
... Abenadar, afterwards called Ctesiphon, was born in a country situated between Babylon
and Egypt in Arabia Felix, to the right of the spot where Job dwelt ...
/.../the dolorous passion of our lord jesus christ/detached account of abenadar.htm

Introductory Notice to Archelaus.
... of Carcha: for the anonymous Ravenna geographer [1441] tells us that there was a
place of that name in Arabia Felix; and Ammianus Marcellinus [1442] mentions ...
/.../introductory notice to archelaus.htm

Sign Seekers, and the Enthusiast Reproved.
... [The queen of Sheba is supposed to have been queen of Sab├Ža, or Arabia Felix, which
lies in the southern part of the peninsula between the Red Sea and the ...
/.../mcgarvey/the four-fold gospel/xlix sign seekers and the.htm

Book 15 Footnotes
... Gallus seems to be no other than that Aelius Lagus whom Dio speaks of as conducting
an expedition that was about this time made into Arabia Felix, according to ...
/.../josephus/the antiquities of the jews/book 15 footnotes.htm

Book 8 Footnotes
... And since Sabea is well known to be a country near the sea in the south of Arabia
Felix, which lay south from Judea also; and since our Savior calls this queen ...
/.../josephus/the antiquities of the jews/book 8 footnotes.htm

The Early History of Particular Churches.
... though it is a matter in dispute whether by India in this case we are to understand
the country now known under that name, or Ethiopia, or Arabia Felix. ...
/.../a key to the knowledge of church history/chapter vii the early history.htm

Of the Three Woe Trumpets.
... Asia Minor is at this day called Natolia, [30] and Arabia Felix is called by the
rest of the Arabians, Ayaman, or south, whence the queen of the south, Matt. ...
/.../mede/a key to the apocalypse/of the three woe trumpets.htm

The Jewish World in the Days of Christ - the Jewish Dispersion in ...
... Southwards, it had extended to the Persian Gulf and through the vast extent of Arabia,
although Arabia Felix and the land of the Homerites may have received ...
/.../the life and times of jesus the messiah/chapter i the jewish world.htm

The Wars of the Jews or History of the Destruction of Jerusalem
... Phasaelus Is Too Hard For Felix; Herod Also Overcomes Antigonus In Rattle; And The ...
When Herod Is Rejected In Arabia, He Makes Haste To Rome Where Antony And ...
/.../josephus/the wars of the jews or history of the destruction of jerusalem/

ATS Bible Dictionary
Arabia Felix

The happy, lies still farther south and east, being bounded east by the Persian Gulf, south by the ocean between Africa and India, and west by the Red Sea. As this region did not immediately adjoin the Holy Land, it is not so frequently mentioned as the former ones. The queen of Sheba, who visited Solomon, 1 Kings 10:1, was probably queen of part of Arabia Felix. This country abounded with riches, and particularly with spices, and is now called Hedjaz, Yemen, etc. It is much celebrated in modern times by reason of the cities of Mecca and Medina being situated in it.

There are, according to native historians, two races of Arabs: those who derive their descent from the primitive inhabitants of the land, Joktan, etc., and those who claim Ishmael as their ancestor. Southern Arabia was settled in part by Cush and his sons, descendants of Ham, who also peopled the adjoining coast of Africa, and in part by descendants of Shem, particularly Joktan, Genesis 10:25,26. Ishmael, Genesis 25:13-15, and the six sons of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:2, together with the seed of Esau and of Lot, occupied the parts of Arabia nearer Judea. The changes of forty centuries render it impossible to distinguish either of these parent sources in the numerous Arab tribes descended from them. These tribes have traditions and peculiarities of their own, and incessant feuds; yet as a whole they are but one people, distinct from all others. The only general division is into those who dwell in cities, as in Southern Arabia, and those who live in the fields and deserts. The latter are migratory, dwelling in tents and removing according to the convenience of water and pasturage, and are often robbers. Each tribe is divided up into little communities, of which a sheik or patriarch is the head. Such are the Bedaween.

In ancient times the Arabs were idolaters and star-worshippers. They are now nominally Mohammedans, but then religion sits but lightly on them. Isolated from other nations, and with slight exceptions free from all foreign control the preserve their ancient manners with singular fidelity, and the study of these throws much light upon Bible narratives. Their language also is still spoken with great purity; and as it is near akin to the Hebrew, it furnishes invaluable aid in the study of the Old Testament.

Subtopics

Arabia

Arabia Deserta

Arabia Felix

Arabia Petraea

Arabia: Exports of

Arabia: Paul Visits

Arabia: Prophecies Against

Arabia: Tribute to Jehoshaphat

Arabia: Tribute to Solomon

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